Using Google Analytics to refine merchandising and product promotions

The whole purpose of having Google Analytics tracking on your site is to find out how your website is performing and to use this data to improve your digital efforts. Yet many businesses miss the mark when it comes to taking action at the level of product listings, despite the fact that this can lead to huge revenue gains! Why do they miss the mark? Two reasons: inaccurate tracking and unclear reporting. The Littledata app helps to fix these issues automatically, providing users with a reliable data stream and automated reporting based on Google Analytics data, but it's still useful to drill down into Google Analytics itself to understand all of the details. In this post I break down how to use Google Analytics to refine merchandising, product promotions and product listings in a way that can have a direct effect on both short-term and long-term revenue for your ecommerce site. For this to work, you'll need to have Enhanced Ecommerce set up on your website. You'll also need some spreadsheet software (Excel, Google Sheets, etc.) so we can play with extracted data and drill down deep. [subscribe] Banners and creatives: getting users to see what we want them to see A full enhanced ecommerce setup will enable you the power to see how much money each of the creatives on your site is bringing you. If your website is like most ecommerce sites, you have several creatives displayed, such as: Homepage carousel Homepage pods Category main banner Choosing which creative should get on your homepage might feel like just a preference, but it doesn't have to be that way. You can use the 'Internal Promotion' menu in Google Analytics (Marketing > Internal Promotions) to make data-driven decisions about your homepage creatives. Imagine an online store that sells scooters and accessories: We have banners for categories like Helmets, Accessories, Mini Micro and Maxi Micro (different sizes of scooters). We have 2 banners on the homepage with these two creatives: Safety (the first one) and Built for Adults (the second one). We want to change one of the creatives on the carousel. Let's analyze what is the best strategy here. The first banner on the carousel was seen 24,404 times. It has a 5.01% click thru rate (CTR) and a £3.90 value per click. The second banner on the carousel was seen 17,109 times. It has a 5.52% CTR a £2.02 value per click. Now we can make a decision. What to discard and what to keep Even though we have a higher CTR on the second banner and this is an indicator that the message is more appealing, the reality is that the revenue that comes with that click is not even half of the revenue we get from a click on the first banner. If you want to make a 100% correct decision here you can analyze the margins on the product promoted by each of the banners. If you have double the margin for the products in the second banner you can get rid of the Safety banner and make the second banner primary. If your margin is the same for both categories then the best decision here is to replace the second banner with the first one. How to populate the carousel We already decided to keep the first banner, but now we need a replacement for the second one. So we need to find a creative in the website that had performed at least the same as the second banner. Based on the example above if we search by CTR higher than 5.52% we can see that we have a banner for Maxi Micro with 20% CTR and a value per click of £5.32. The action here is to replace the second slot of the carousel with this creative. After 1-2 weeks we can retake this process all over again and we may decide to reverse the creatives (Banner 1 will be Banner 2 and Banner 2 will be Banner 1 in the carousel). This is not a one-time job. The analysis should be made every time you add a new creative or make a new promotion.--or even as a weekly task. Many Littledata clients run this type of analysis on a regular basis, whether or not they've launched a new promotion, to make sure they are optimizing sales and conversions. You should pay attention to the average click thru rate (CTR) based on creatives category, and also you should know what is your standard deviation for each category so that you can quickly spot which are over- or under-performing. Based on the example above, the average CTR for a carousel banner on the site is 5.26% and the standard deviation is 0.25%. So I know that if I see a banner that has a CTR less than 5.01%, there is room to improve. As per above for the category pages, we have an average of 10.92% CTR with a standard deviation of 6.28. This means that everything under 4.63% should be replaced ASAP and everything above 17.20% should be promoted. List views: how to arrange products for ultimate engagement One of the best Enhanced Ecommerce features in Google Analytics is the Product List Performance Report (Conversions > Ecommerce > Product List Performance). This report shows you how many views each list gets. Why does this matter? Because if you have a high margin on some products from a specific category, you should find out if that list (category) is being sufficiently promoted on your site. From these reports, we can find out things like: Most viewed categories (sort by Product List Views) The category that has the biggest engagement (sort by Product List CTR) The list that is bringing you the most money per view (Product Revenue divided by Product List Views) Which categories are performing best -- and which are most profitable? Let's say I have three categories in my store: categories 1, 2 and 3. And my margin for products in category 3 is three times the margin for those in category 1. In the report above, we see that we don't have a click thru for Category 2. This could mean: The tracking is not working on that page Users have issues clicking on the products There is no call to action (CTA) on that page So we can assume that Category 2 is not working. Moving forward we should analyze the performance of Category 1 vs Category 3. Views Clicks CTR Revenue Revenue / click Margin at each $1 sold Margin at 1000 clicks Category 1 1,701,660 57,038 3.35% $329,799.67 $5.78 0.23 $1,329.88 Category 3 46,895 3,175 6.77% $23,881.37 $7.52 0.69 $5,189.97 We can see that even though we have a fraction of the views for Category 3, this category is for us almost 3 times more profitable per 1000 clicks. At this point, we should investigate how much marketing we're doing around Category 3 to see if there are options to push harder on this highly profitable category, alongside whatever's already working for promoting Category 1. Order matters The Product List Performance Report can also help us find out how customers progress from viewing a product in a list to clicking through for more information. Let's analyze the data in the above report. The table is sorted by Product List Views for Mobile devices. We know that the alignment for this website is one product under the other and for a product view to be sent the user needs to see it for at least one second. So we can draw these conclusions: Position 2 and 3 are normally visually scanned by users. The fourth product in a list is seen in more detail but has a lower CTR than the second or third product in the list. We know that each page has 10 products so the average Product List CTR rate for page 1 is 1.36% and the standard deviation is 0.42. From this, we can see that position 2 has a good CTR and we need to change the photo and text of the listing to attract more attention -- products placed in the second position in a product listing on this site tend to convert well. Position 4 gets attention but has low performance so we could try changing the photo and title of products in this position in order to increase the CTR. If we are looking at this report as aggregate data then we can conclude that if we want to make a push for particular products, we should place them in position 1 or 4 for maximum visibility, or position 1 or 2 for maximum CTR. How to monetize product list positions We can take this analysis further by examining how list slots relate to product revenue, whether on your site or via affiliate programs. Looking at the report in aggregate and extracting the data, we can give a monetary value to each slot in the product listings. Product List Position Product List Views Product Revenue Revenue/view per slot 1 2,290,505 £183,207.00 £0.08 4 2,279,917 £99,830.00 £0.04 3 2,246,164 £117,096.00 £0.05 2 2,239,943 £157,605.00 £0.07 6 2,062,271 £73,183.00 £0.04 5 2,053,534 £94,889.00 £0.05 8 1,788,080 £58,585.00 £0.03 7 1,775,762 £60,603.00 £0.03 9 1,750,248 £52,366.00 £0.03 10 1,606,599 £50,913.00 £0.03 From the above example, we can see that each of the slots in the listing has a value per view. And the value is decreasing with the position. Using the known margin for a specific product in a list, you can improve your ROI just by positioning it in a slot with a higher CTR based on the model above. Which photos should you show first in a listing? If you offer a product in multiple colors, you should use an image and a default (primary) product selection in the most popular color. But how do you figure that out? Product variants are too often left behind in analysis. The Product Variant field captures the specific variation of a product, e.g., XS, S, M, L for size; or Red, Blue, Green, Black for color. It is an Enhanced Ecommerce feature that can give you powerful insights into your users' searches, interests and preferences. Paying attention to variant performance can have a big effect on shopping behavior and sales. In the example above, we're looking closely at the Product Variant dimension to figure out which color is most popular. We have a product with 4 colors: Black, Grey, Midnight Black and Persian Grey. There isn't enough transaction data to make a decision based on purchases, but we can calculate the most popular variant (in this case, the most popular color) based on how often users have added items in each color to their shopping carts (Adds To Cart). For Black, we have a View to Add To Cart rate of 0.6% and for Grey 0.8%. So in this case we should use the main Grey color for advertisements and main photos in listings pages. We might also try using the Persian Grey variant. Note that in this example we can calculate for each product view because we've listed each color as a different product. If you're listing only one product and you show variants on the product page, then you'll need to divide the Adds To Cart for each variant by the total Product List Views. What to do next If you need help with Enhanced Ecommerce reporting, our analysts are ready to come to the rescue. You can either request a consultation or just sign up for a free Google Analytics audit and contact us directly from the app. How are you using Enhanced Ecommerce reports in Google Analytics? Drop us a note below.

2018-02-23

How goals work in Google Analytics

Every business, in order to grow, needs to set up a certain number of objectives and KPI’s. Once they are set, you can actually track the way your business evolves and see if they are met or you underperformed. This is where Goals come in: the actual definition that Google has on their support page: “A goal represents a completed activity, called a conversion, that contributes to the success of your business.” In this article, I will answer to the following questions: What are Goals in Google Analytics? When should you use the Goals and what for? What are Goals in Google Analytics?   Goals are specific user actions that you can then use in other reports (such as landing pages or channels) to see whether users engaged with your website. It is really important to remember that you have a maximum of 20 goals for each Google Analytics view. Also, once you set up a Goal, it will stay set up forever in the view. You can disable goals, but you will still have them there. You need to make sure that the objectives you set up are relevant to your business and they can be monitored by using the goals. What Goals should you track and why? The four big categories that in which you can track Goals in Analytics are: URLs Time Pages per visit Custom Events The most useful of these are custom events. Here are some of the areas you should definitely consider tracking with custom events: Leads – If your site has a sign-up or contact form for enquiries you'll want to track how many users successfully complete it - especially because you want to convert those leads. Newsletter sign-ups – Newsletters are really important for many businesses, to educate the people that are interested in your business. Tracking what drives users to sign up for these emails will help you do a better at content strategy. White paper and E-book downloads – Make sure your buyers' journey is set up properly and that you make this is a priority in your objectives. By tracking these two really specific actions, you will be able to up-sell your key product, software or service. Trial sign-ups – If you follow a freemium business model or if you use the trial period in order to engage your users, then tracking this area will definitely give you insights into who is your ideal persona. This article from The Digital Marketing Institute will also show you other metrics you should monitor.   Happy Reporting. Get Social! Follow us on LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook and keep up-to-date with our Google Analytics insights.

2017-05-24

How to use Analytics for mobile apps: Google Analytics SDK vs Firebase

This is the third article in the Q&A series. I will be answering some of the most-asked questions about Google Analytics and how it works. If you’ve missed the previous articles, you can access Part 2 (What is the bounce rate in Google Analytics) and see what questions we answered there.   In this article, I will give you an answer to the following questions: How Google Analytics works for mobile apps? What are the differences between Firebase Analytics and Google Analytics? How Google Analytics works for mobile apps? Instead of using JavaScript, for mobile apps, you will be using an SDK. That is a Software Development Kit and it’s what collects the data from your mobile application. As most smartphones are either Android and iOS based, you will have different SDK’s based on the operating system. The SDK works similarly as the JavaScript and collects data like the number of users and sessions, the session duration, the operating system, the device model and the location. All of that is packed in hits and sent to your Google Analytics account. Here is an overview from The Google Analytics Help Center. The main difference is that the data is not sent right away. Because a mobile device might not have a connection to the internet at some points in time, the data is stored on the device and is sent when it is eventually connected. The process is called dispatching and it’s done at different time intervals on Android and on iOS. On Android, the hits are dispatched every 30 minutes and on iOS, every 2 minutes. Those numbers can be customised though. [subscribe heading="Need help with Google Analytics?" button_link="https://www.littledata.io/contact-us" button_text="SCHEDULE A DEMO"] Keep in mind that you can customise the code so that you can track different data in case you feel the base code is not sufficient for you. What are the differences between Firebase Analytics and Google Analytics? Firebase Analytics (FA) is another way to collect the event data. While Google Analytics is a general-purpose (and more web oriented) analytics tool, Firebase was built keeping mobile in mind. There are some things that were added in in the later and also things that are missing from GA. Here are some noteworthy points when considering Firebase Analytics: Real-time view is missing for Firebase Analytics (we mainly use this when testing the app for new events). Events are available after 4 to 6 hours in Firebase Analytics. The Behavior Flow is missing from Firebase Analytics (since there are no screen views logged). The Audiences feature is a big advantage that FA has. If you couple this with the Notifications it will allow you to engage with a specific group of users. If users experience a crash, then an audience group will be created automatically when using the Firebase Crash Reporting feature. Funnel analysis based on custom events is easier in FA. However, if you use Littledata, then this problem can be solved for Google Analytics with the custom reports that we can build. Some events are logged automatically in Firebase Analytics (for example the sessions based on the Activity life-cycle). Firebase has a relatively low methods footprint compared to the methods count that Google Analytics uses - making it less processor and network intensive. As a final point there are benefits for using both platforms to track your Analytics, but if you do focus your business on mobile applications, keep in mind that Firebase Analytics was created for mobile apps. Happy Reporting. Get Social! Follow us on LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook and keep up-to-date with our Google Analytics insights.

2017-04-11

How to improve your landing pages

With the How to improve your landing pages using Google Analytics blog post, I wanted to help answer the question, why users are clicking a call-to-action but are not converting? Now I will give you some basic tips on how to improve your landing pages, overall. Do what you say and say what you do There is nothing more frustrating for a client than to hope for honey and receive salt. Donʼt promise one thing and then deliver something else .. or even worse nothing at all (a 404 page). For example, if you are giving away an ebook, and your CTA says “Get your free ebook”, donʼt provide a PayPal form on the next screen asking for $2.95 for the product you said would be free, or merely say “thanks for registering” without a link to the product you are offering. Yes, you will have gained a lead, but the customer is now worthless and will tell others about your unfair tactics. In order to get the answer to "Why don't they convert" check this checklist: Do you respect the above? If not this is your biggest business issue. Do you track how many clicks your call-to-action have? If not, see the previous blog post about tracking CTAs What is your conversion rate? Depending on your business model, a conversion rate of 5% to 20% is be normal. (Calculate users that finished the call-to-action divided by users that clicked the call-to-action button.) With these answers, you can figure out what your problem is. This will either be that the users are not clicking or the users are not converting. If the users are not converting you can: A/B test the layout of next page after they click the call-to-action button A/B test the text of the next page after they click the call-to-action button Provide online support on that page offering customers the option to ask direct questions Create a survey for the segment of users that clicked the call-to-action but didn't convert to find out why they didn't Have any questions? Comment below or get in touch!   Get Social! Follow us on LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook and keep up-to-date with our Google Analytics insights.

2017-03-16

How to improve your landing pages with clear CTAs

In the previous blog post, how to improve your landing pages using Google Analytics, we started analysis what makes a good landing page. Some of the ideas were related to call to actions. Your landing page must have a call to action (CTA) correlated with the marketing campaign and the full content of the page. Clear and unambiguous CTA(s) If you are offering app access, go with "Get Started" or "Create account" and don't say “Get your free ebook” or “go” or “submit”. Say short and clear what you want them to do. Don't mislead the users and don't use fancy words. When you're choosing the CTA for your landing page you should consider these three: what you say how your customer will interact with it where to place it What to say is the wording. If you want the customer to subscribe to the newsletter say "subscribe to the newsletter", if you want them to buy say "buy", if you want them to call say "call". Keep it short and clear. If the customer needs to subscribe you need to provide them with the field were to add their email address; If you want them to call you then you should use a dial function for mobile users or show the number for the desktop users; If you want them to buy then the press of the button should redirect them to a page where they can choose the option for delivery and payment. Where to place the call to action in your landing page is simple - where the customers will see it first. I presume you already have event tracking, in place (if no, find out how to set up in this blog post: Set up event tracking in GTM ). Based on some numbers from Google Analytics, let's see how good and bad engagement looks like for a landing page. Find out the level of engagement with the page Bounce rate: This will show you the number of people that entered this page and left without taking any other action (like seeing the second page or clicking on the call to action). The bounce rate will tell you how your whole landing page is engaging with the audience. In the example above, the landing page, /find-more has a bounce rate of 98,8%. This is very bad! On the other side, we have the landing page apps.shopify.littledata with 0% bounce rate. This is the holy grail of landing pages. These means that from an engagement point of view your landing page is perfect. As a rule: You should aim for at least the same bounce rate as you have on the entire website as a medium. Find out if your call to action performed Method 1 - Deducting from landing page report Go into Google Analytics -> in the search bar search landing page -> Choose Site content - Landing pages. Click on your landing page name and now add a second dimension: Second page. Find the link where your call to action redirects and analyse all elements in this report. If you don't have events in place, you will still be able to see how your traffic is clicking through the links on your landing page. If your landing page has more than 1 action then you can add a second dimension on the landing page report and see what was the second page they visited. In the example above, the call-to-action redirected them to the apps.shopify.com/littledata. From the numbers of sessions, we can see that only 10% of the users clicked the call-to-action button. 89% of the people wanted to find more about the product before purchasing. This is the example of bad engagement. The fact that 89% of the people wanted to find more means that we need to provide more details on the landing page and maybe have a clearer call-to-action. Method 2 - Deducting from Top Events report For this, go to Google Analytics and search for Top Events and add a second dimension to the report "Page". You can also build a custom report so you see the number of people that saw the page and the number of people that took the call-to-action. Have any questions? Comment below or get in touch!   Get Social! Follow us on LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook and keep up-to-date with our Google Analytics insights.

2017-03-14

How to improve your landing pages using Google Analytics

Landing page optimisation is one part of a broader digital marketing process called conversion optimisation, or conversion rate optimisation (CRO), with the goal of improving the percentage of visitors to a website that becomes sales leads/or customers. Let's see how to improve your landing page performance. There are some things to check when you want to improve the conversion rate of a particular page. In order to get the best data, we use Google Analytics and Hotjar. I will start with Hotjar because it is faster! With Hotjar you will understand what users want, care about and interact with on your site by visually representing their clicks, taps and scrolling behaviour. This is shown with nice videos of a user's journey leading to conversion. With Hotjar, you can see what confuses people, what is not clear and if for your customer point-of-view is clear on your landing page. And now the hard and exciting part: Analyse the data collected in Google Analytics. If you think that the home page is a landing page please read this before you go further: Website Homepage vs Landing page - what's the difference? and this: Don’t obsess over your homepage – its importance will decrease over time! When a visitor clicks on a Pay-Per-Click (PPC) ad, they're taken to a landing page — a web page whose sole purpose of existence is to entice people to take an action. If done well, it could be the most effective marketing weapon in your arsenal. The correct analysis of data can save you a lot of money or even your business. If your visitors donʼt know what to do when they land on your landing page, then you are throwing your advertising money out the window. Your call-to-action (CTA) is the primary conversion goal of a visitor to your landing page. Next, I give you some examples of common actions that you might want a customer to do on your landing page: purchasing a product subscribing to a newsletter calling you on the phone downloading an ebook or whitepaper watching a demo requesting information Let's find out, step-by-step if your landing page is a winner using this checklist. Click on them to find out how to analyse and interpret data CTA(s) clear and unambiguous Do what you say and say what you do Don't be like Trump. Leave the Amazing! Awesome! words elsewhere Less is more Keep it where it can be seen Know your clients Twice is better Design matters Choose what matters the most CTA(s) clear and unambiguous Google Analytics report: "Landing pages" with a second dimension added to the report: "Second page" If you are offering an app access go with "Get Started" or "Create account" and don't say “Get your free ebook” or “go” or “submit”. Do what you say and say what you do Google Analytics report: "Landing pages" with a second dimension added to the report: "Second page" analyses the bounce rate on the call-to-action link. Donʼt promise one thing and then deliver something else or even worse nothing at all (a 404 page). To follow the same example, if you have an app and say "30 days free trial" don't let people click 'try for 30 days' and on the next page provide a PayPal form to charge them for a month period. Don't be like Trump. Leave the Amazing! Awesome! words elsewhere Google Analytics report: "Pages" see how many FAQ and Terms pageview you have. Resist the temptation to include bloated adjectives. Such claims are likely to make people think you are overselling and trying too hard. Less is more Google Analytics report: "Top Events" with a second dimension added to the report: "Page" analyses the clicks on your call-to-action versus other clicks in page or scroll actions. Make space for your call-to-action. Let them breathe visually. Using more whitespace will allow your button or statement to stand out on the page. Colour choice is important here also; create a high contrast between the call-to-action and surrounding elements to assert it’s dominance. Keep it where it can be seen Google Analytics report: "Top Events" analyse the scroll tracking. See how far your visitors are scrolling down If you have a long page, donʼt put the call-to-action below the fold. Take into consideration, the different screen sizes and adapt your landing pages for the most common. Most of the users will not scroll far down the page so be sure to put your value proposition and your call-to-action as a first-seen element in the page. Know your clients Google Analytics report: "Demographics - Language" Speak your client's language. Provide different landing pages based on country. Advertise differently based on specific demographics. However good your product or service is, the simple truth is that no one will buy it if they don't want it or believe they don't need it. And you won't persuade anyone that they want or need to buy what you're offering unless you clearly understand what it is your customers really want. Twice is better Google Analytics report: Combine "Top Events" (for scroll tracking) and "All Pages" for the propotion of sessions with FAQ/Terms pageviews Not all customers are ready to engage right away and might need some supporting information to ease their worries or answer their questions. If you are asking someone to buy something, a sensible secondary call-to-action can be to download a product brochure. This keeps them in your realm of influence (as opposed to leaving to do research elsewhere) and builds confidence. Ensure that the safety net CTA doesnʼt compete in size and visual dominance – often a simple text link is adequate, beneath the main big action button. If you are asking someone to purchase online, offering a phone number for phone orders can make a potential customer more likely to convert if thatʼs their preferred contact method. Design matters Google Analytics report: "Source/medium" shows the bounce rate for each campaign Carry your primary call-to-action throughout the entire acquisition and conversion experience, from audience acquisition ads (PPC, email, banner, social media link) through your landing page and on to the final destination page. Choose what represents you the most (maybe some colours or even the call-to-action itself), you should be able to look at the page and have your eye immediately drawn to the action area. Be audience appropriate Google Analytics report: there is no report in Analytics for this. Just remember your experience when reading an email or a Facebook comment Previously, I said to speak the customers' language. Now I'm saying to take care what they can interpret. Reading a statement is different from hearing it. So don't be too pushy, don't use a lot of exclamation signs, don't use a lot of caps lock wording and be a friend when they say what they feel when they see the call-to-action. I recommend reading this blog post from January: How to improve your conversion rate optimisation and this one: Conversion friendly experiences: reducing landing page friction with psychology. These two are related and complementary to the actions you're trying to take. In the next couple of weeks I will go deeper in each section and show you how good and bad engagement looks like for a landing page. Have any questions? Get in touch with our experts!   Get Social! Follow us on LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook and keep up-to-date with our Google Analytics insights.

2017-02-17

Enhanced ecommerce tracking for travel booking sites

Every online business presence has a goal. These goals (bookings, donations, subscribers, events, or purchases) are the reason for our efforts. But how many of us really track how our goals really perform? In this article, you will find out how to take these business goals and track them on Google Analytics with an ecommerce approach. This article is not about how to set up goals in Google Analytics, but if you are interested in finding out more about the setup or what there are, then read: Setting up a destination goal funnel in Google Analytics. The advantage of using an ecommerce approach for non-ecommerce websites is that after the setup is done, you have a basis to develop correct marketing strategies. You will know what channels brings you money, you will know what channels interact with each other and you can adjust your budget to maximise the ROI. If you're in the business of selling tickets (planes, concerts, conferences), book medical exams or collect donations, this article concerns you! I will show you a step-by-step guide on where to implement the Enhanced Ecommerce features and I will provide links for each to find out how to implement them. Let's say you are Wizz Air. You sell flight tickets and book cars and so on. Promotion impressions and promotion clicks Each time Wizz Air displays a banner with some kind of marketing communication that banner can be tracked as a "promotion" in Google Analytics. In Google Analytics, you can see the performance of each banner and make decisions to replace them, change the order or even make them bigger based on the tracking you implement. The technicalities: implementing via Google Tag Manager or implementing via Google Analytics. After you implement the tracking and create the tags (for GTM) you will be able to see the data in Google Analytics under Ecommerce > Marketing > Internal Promotions Based on the position, click-thru-rate, and revenue gained for each, Wizz Air can then rearrange banners, eliminate some of them or boost their visibility. Ecommerce activities (catalogue views, service page views, click on call to actions) Wizz Air provides multiple sections on the website where you can search for flights. These sections can be mapped as product lists. For WizzAir, the product lists are in the homepage section, timetable section, and maps section. Typically, Google Analytics and Google Tag Manager requests the fields below when sending a product list view (product impressions). I will provide you with a schema that will capture the flight booking particularities but you can use your own business specific examples. When you click on a red point on the map, the customer can see the flights from a particular city. We will send all the flight information from that city as product impressions. 'id': 'LTN - PRG',                          // The departure airport code - The arrival airport code 'name': 'London Luton - Prague',             // City name of departure - City name for arrival 'category': 'Flight',                        // WizzAir offers flight booking along with car booking, and hotel booking 'brand': 'WizzAir',                          // If this would be a tourism agency instead of WizzAir will be other company. 'variant': '010117',                      // If the page has the option to add the date we will add the date as a MMDDYY When the search button is present, you send the action "click". ga('ec:setAction', 'click', {                                    // click action. 'list': 'Maps'                                                          // Product list (string). }); After searching, the client can see the selection page from the product list. For Wizz Air customers, they can search the best price and see the package options. In the case of Wizz Air, these pages can be considered the product pages. The usual structure that needs to be sent to Google Analytics and Google Tag Manager is: 'id': 'LTN - PRG',                                    // The departure airport code - The arrival airport code 'name': 'London Luton - Prague',          // City name of departure - City name for arrival 'category': 'Flight',                                 // WizzAir offers flight booking along with car booking, and hotel booking 'brand': 'WizzAir',                               // If this would be a tourism agency instead of WizzAir will be other company. 'variant': '010117',                             // If the page has the option to add the date we will add the date as a MMDDYY Each time the client changes the day a new detail view should be sent. Clicking on the price box will trigger an Add to cart action. The usual content of an Add To cart activity is: 'name': 'London Luton - Prague',    // The departure airport code - The arrival airport code 'id': 'LTN - PRG',                               // City name of departure - City name for arrival 'price': '61.99',                                  // Selected price for the flight 'brand': 'WizzAir',                          // If this would be a tourism agency instead of WizzAir will be other company. 'category': 'Flight',                        // WizzAir offers flight booking along with car booking, and hotel booking 'variant': '010117',                         //If the page has the option to add the date we will add the date as a MMDDYY 'quantity': 1'                                   // Person number 'dimenstion1': 'LTN13432',           // Flight number 'dimenstion2': 'WizzGO'              // Package option (Basic, Wizz Go, Wizz Plus) Check out steps and booking In the case of Wizz Air, each "continue" button will send a checkout step to Google Analytics. Sending the checkout steps will provide insights about where the customers drop off and what process steps can be improved. Wizz Air has a 4-steps checkout (choose flight, choose passengers, services, and payment). The final thing to send is the transaction (the booking). The structure and implementation details for Google Analytics and Google Tag Manager are in the links and the fields, in this case, will be: 'ecommerce': { 'purchase': { 'actionField': { 'id': 'T12345',                                           // Transaction ID. Required for purchases and refunds. 'affiliation': 'booking.com'                    // Affiliation agent, 'revenue': '35.43',                                 // Total booking value (incl. tax, airport fees etc) 'tax':'4.90', 'shipping': '5.99',                                 //can use this field to capture airport fees or thir party operators fees 'coupon': 'SUMMER_SALE'              //if a discount cupon was used }, 'products': [{                                      //if the flight has a return flight then two products will be sent 'name': 'London Luton - Prague',     // The departure airport code - The arrival airport code 'id': 'LTN - PRG',                                // City name of departure - City name for arrival 'price': '61.99',                                  // Selected price for the flight 'brand': 'WizzAir',                           // If this would be a tourism agency instead of WizzAir will be other company. 'category': 'Flight',                         // WizzAir offers flight booking along with car booking, and hotel booking 'variant': '010117',                          //If the page has the option to add the date we will add the date as a MMDDYY 'quantity': 1'                                   // Person number 'dimenstion1': 'LTN13432',           // Fligh number 'dimenstion2': 'WizzGO'               // Package option (Basic, Wizz Go, Wizz Plus) 'coupon': 'SUMMER_SALE'         // Optional fields may be omitted or set to empty string. }, { 'name': 'Prague -London Luton',    // The departure airport code - The arrival airport code 'id': 'PRG -LTN',                               // City name of departure - City name for arrival 'price': '61.99',                                 // Selected price for the flight 'brand': 'WizzAir',                           // If this would be a tourism agency instead of WizzAir will be other company. 'category': 'Flight',                         // WizzAir offers flight booking along with car booking, and hotel booking 'variant': '150117',                        //If the page has the option to add the date we will add the date as a MMDDYY 'quantity': 1'                                   // Person number 'dimenstion1': 'LTN2143432',        // Flight number 'dimenstion2': 'WizzGO'             // Package option (Basic, Wizz Go, Wizz Plus) 'coupon': 'SUMMER_SALE'        // Optional fields may be omitted or set to empty string. }] } } Sending all these steps to Google Analytics about the customer activity, on any kind of website, will provide you with information about return on marketing spends, improve page layout performance, improve conversion rate, find out insights about customer needs and a lot more. Having the full enhanced ecommerce setup is very powerful and can bring many advantages. You can test the full setup on the Google Analytics demo account. Have any questions or need some help? Please get in touch or comment below!  

2017-01-24

How to track your newsletter performance with Google Analytics – part 2

We will go further into newsletter tracking and try to get all important stats from Google Analytics such as emails sent and emails openings. The advantage to doing this is that for most digital teams, the people creating the newsletters are not necessarily the ones analysing the data. This can help bring the teams a more in-depth view into their work and also a new angle in analysing the newsletter. Before you go ahead and implement this, you should be aware of a few aspects and make some important decisions. First, will you all be using the same Google Analytics account? Since the newsletter opens will send a lot of visits to your Google Analytics account and most of them will be bounces (a high percent of users will not click on the newsletter to go to the website), take into consideration that using the same account will interfere with your existing data from the website. Second, you can create a new, separate account. If you choose to create a new account you need to find out, if you use user tracking, how to link the user activity with the user activity on the website. For Google 360 users this is simpler because they can join views, but for regular Google Analytics users, this might be a struggle. The third option, which I recommend, is to create a second Google Analytics tracking code and run it in parallel with the one you're currently using for the newsletter. Now, let's dive into how you can track email opening and email clicks. The usual Google Analytics script will not work for email clients. However, Google Analytics also includes event tracking which can be used through an embedded image pixel within the email body. Implementing the Google Analytics pixel provides great information like real-time tracking, browser and operating system details and demographics. Insert this snippet in the body of your email like this: <html> <head> ... </head> <body> .... <img src = "Paste the URL here of the Google Analytics implementation"> </body> <footer> ... </footer> </html> Most of the newsletter platforms have an HTML editor, which you can find by searching the sign " <> " in the template. This will let you add <img src = URL> in the body of your email. The URL image pixel looks might like this: <img src="http://www.google-analytics.com/collect?v=1&tid=UA-12345678-1&cid=User_ID&t=event&ec=email&ea=open&el=recipient_id&cs=newsletter&cm=email&cn=Campaign_Name"> Building the URL of the Google Analytics implementation can be done with Google Analytics tool named: Hit Builder. You can also test the URL in the tool and see the hit in real time in Google Analytics. You have two options when sending the openings: as an event or as a custom metric.  Before you go ahead with the HIT Builder let's get familiar with the components of the URL: URL Component Explanation cm1=Custom metric This can be cm1,cm2 etc based on what you've created as a custom metric tid=UA-12345678-1 Your Google Analytics Tracking ID cid=User_ID A systematic tracking ID for the customer t=event Tells Google Analytics this is an Event Hit Type ec=email The Event Category helps segment various events ea=open The Event Action helps specify exactly what happened el=recipient_id Event Label specifies a unique identification for this recipient cs=newsletter Campaign Source allows segmentation of campaign types cm=email Campaign Medium could segment social vs. email, etc. cn=Campaign_Name Campaign Name identifies the campaign to you   To see openings as a custom metric, you should first create a new custom metric in the Google Analytics admin interface named Email Opens. Log in to Google Analytics, and click on Admin. Select the Account and Web Property, and click on Custom Definitions under the Web Property column. Then click on Custom Metrics. In the next window, click on the New Custom Metric button, and give your custom metric a name, formatting type, minimum and maximum value, and make sure the box is checked for Active. You may also find some other benefits to using Google Analytics tracking this way over most email service provider (ESP) tracking. It provides great system information like real-time tracking, browser and operating system details, demographic information including location, and will even tie in nicely with your web reports. How To Use Your Results The event tracking results can be seen in Google Analytics right away. Below are some examples of where you can see reports within Google Analytics. Real Time Events of openings for the newsletter: GA events This report shows the tracking for opens of the emails sent. You can now see how long it takes for people to start opening the newsletter after you've sent them. With this information, you can compare it with past newsletters and see if people are opening it faster or slower, which helps you determine if the subject of the message is motivating enough. Also, you can see what times of the day get the most opens and plan your newsletter schedule around that information. User location With the user location, you can see where in the world people are opening the message you're sending. This can help you determine who your most active audience is and if you should start tailoring your content towards different nations. If you have access to a translation service, this would also be helpful to determine what languages would be beneficial to add to your marketing content. Google Analytics also has a guide, which I recommend to read as well:  Email Tracking - Measurement Protocol.   Get Social! Follow us on LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook and keep up-to-date with our Google Analytics insights.

2017-01-18
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