Tips on how to improve your conversion rate optimisation (CRO)

In internet marketing, conversion optimisation, or conversion rate optimisation (CRO) is a system for increasing the percentage of visitors to a website that converts into customers, or more generally, takes any desired action on a web page. Let's find out how you can improve your conversion rate optimisation with some easy to implement ideas. To start improve your conversion rate optimisation you need tools and analysis. Analytics Google Analytics (free) KISSMetrics Mixpanel Segment.io Chartbeat Clicky RJ Metrics Woopra Chart.io Custora Sumall GoodData Omniture There are more, and depending on your business size, type and traffic you’ll need to determine which is best for you. For most companies Google Analytics is plenty. If you want to have a cohort analysis, using a combination of Google Analytics and KissMetrics will do the trick. User Surveys Qualaroo offers online surveys that allow you to ask questions on specific pages or at specific points in your funnel. Survey Monkey is an online survey tool, which helps create surveys, customer feedback and market research via email and social media. SurveyGizmo is a software company focusing on creating online surveys, questionnaires, and forms for capturing and analysing data. PollDaddy is a user-friendly polling software that can be used to get user feedback via email or social media. Survey.io is a fixed survey designed for startups to determine if their product is delivering an irreplaceable must-have experience. User Testing Optimizely is a website optimisation platform focused on A/B and multivariate testing, making them easier to use and understand on your site. Google Content Experiments is integrated with Google Analytics and is Google’s free website testing and optimisation tool. Visual Web Optimiser also focuses on an easier approach to A/B and multivariate testing but includes behavioural targeting, heatmaps, usability testing, as well. Unbounce also offers A/B testing, while focusing predominantly on the efficiency of your landing page. Google Optimize, a new tool from Google will conduct A/B tests for free and it is currently is gradually rolling out. Now, with one of each category, we can run tests and improve our conversion rate optimisation and also our revenue. 1. Site Speed This factor can't be ignored. As the Tag Man blog reports, a single 1-second delay in page-load can result in a 7% decrease in conversions. Pay attention to your site speed to ensure your optimisation efforts aren’t in vain. Use an analytics tool to find your Page Speed. For ecommerce the conversion rate is a closed sale, but for a blog the conversion can be any goal you want. How to fix this: Minimise HTTP Requests. Reduce server response time. Enable compression. Enable browser caching. Minify Resources. Optimise images. Optimise CSS Delivery. Prioritise above-the-fold content. 2. Take advantage of what you have Your website is your salesperson. A good salesperson markets their most appealing and important attributes. Double-check your website and make sure you’re communicating your value and advantages. Also, be sure to track these interactions and how people react. Use an analytics platform to measure the importance. Social proof. Testimonials will give users a feeling of security and trust. Appeals to authority. Try to find a trend, belief, or position that’s advocated by someone of stature in your area of expertise to promote you. Third party validation. A variant of the social proof above, but instead of testimonials you can use trusted brand logos to borrow their brand equity for your brand. Build a community. Users are the main reason to be online. Give them a way to participate in comments, reviews and feedback. Referrals. Try to make your clients your most important advocates. Help them refer you, with incentives like discounts or free gifts to users who recruit others through email, social media, etc. 3. Raise Your Average Order Value (AOV) Here are a few methods of increasing your AOV. You can improve your revenue even without improving your conversion rate. Bundle the products. Combine complementary products, and give the user a discount for purchasing them as a bundle. You can A/B test, measure and survey to find out what has the biggest impact. Promotions. Promotions come in many shapes and forms (free shipping, 1+1, 2+1, etc). Implement Enhanced Ecommerce if you're an ecommerce store and track the promotions interaction and how each contributes to the sale. Rewards. Loyalty programs will keep users returning. In particular, programs that reward higher levels of spending (escalating coupons are an example of this) can positively impact AOV. Track this with an analysis platform as with a user-centred platform. 4. How Friendly is your online presence? Do you have a responsive website? There is a good chance that some of your users will be arriving via their phones and tablets, and almost nothing is more difficult to navigate than a site that's not mobile-friendly. If a user cannot navigate your site, they can’t become customers. Compare your conversion rate with your analytics platform for each device. Does your website work on most browsers? Not all browsers are built the same–that goes without saying, but do you know what browsers are most popular among your users? There is a chance that your site is awesome on Chrome, but a mess on Internet Explorer. Do the research. Load up the browsers and make sure a user’s arrival is always solid. Fixing any browser specific issues could result in a rise in conversions. Do you have a healthy privacy policy? It is good to show users their information is secure: signals, like SSL (https://) lock images, trusted badges, and social proof can all allay fears. Make sure you have a complete privacy policy linked from the footer of every page on your site. Do you speak your client's language? If you're a client based website that accessible worldwide, wouldn't you want to adjust to offer your services to your audience? If you’re ignoring language support, you could be losing vital clients. Did you build your website starting from the user? No user will ever complain that your site is too easy to use, fast or clear. How many clicks does it take for a user to get to your must have experience? Have you ever counted? Make sure you are thinking as the client where less is more. Do you adjust for your customers time? Information on your landing page should be prioritised by importance. You typically have five seconds to convince a visitor to stick around. Make the most of that brief moment in time. How good is your hook, and how well do you deliver on the promise? Are you adapting to the new video trend? A video on your landing page has the chance to drive conversions. Consider YouTube, or other services as long as users do not have to download additional plugins. Can your customers leave ratings and reviews? Having reviews and ratings bring real feedback from real clients. Clients are then more likely to make a decision based on what they read from other perspectives. Have any questions? Get in touch with our experts!   Get Social! Follow us on LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook and keep up-to-date with our Google Analytics insights.

2017-01-04

3 reasons why you should use Google Tag Manager

If you have an online presence you know that every day you find new and interesting app's and platforms that can increase your revenue. From integrations with Adwords, DoubleClick, Facebook to custom plugins, you need some help inserting all this script in the page that makes it as easy as possible and without asking for developer help. Google Tag Manager can launch new tags with just a few clicks. Google Tag Manager supports both Google and third-party tags and is the web’s most popular enterprise-grade tag management solution. We have written a lot or articles on how to use it, but we never provided a list of why you should use it, so here it is: 1. Reliable and accurate data. When your tags aren’t working properly they can impair your site performance, resulting in slow load times, website unavailability, or a loss of functionality. That’s why it’s critical to have a tag management solution in place that allows you to quickly determine the status of your tags. Easy-to-use error checking and speedy tag loading in Google Tag Manager means you know that every tag works. Be assured that your mission-critical data is being collected reliably and accurately. The IT team will feel confident that the site is running smoothly, so everyone's happy, even during busy holidays or the launch of a new campaign. Large brands have implemented Tag Manager to launch their tags exactly for this reason: reliable and accurate data. PizzaHut, Made.com, AgeUk and many others use Google Tag Manager to manage their tags for Google and third-party platforms. 2. Quickly deploy Google and third-party tags. With so many measurement tools out there, marketers need flexibility — whether that’s changing tags on the fly or having the ability to easily add tags from other sources. In Google Tag Manager, marketers can add or change their own tags as needed. Google Tag Manager supports all tags and has easy-to-use templates for a wide range of Google and third-party tags — for web and mobile apps. Don’t see a tag listed? You can add it immediately as a custom tag. With so much flexibility, your campaign can be underway with just a few clicks. Even if you are using Adwords, Adroll, Facebook, Hotjar, Criteo or your own script you can implement it with Google Tag Manager. Even if you're a publisher as nationalgeographic-magazine.com, sell furniture at Made.com, sell event tickets as eventbrite.com or organise courses as redcrossfirstaidtraining.co.uk, Google Tag Manager will be the best way to organise all the scripts your partners provides. 3. Collaborate across the enterprise and make tag updates efficiently. Collaboration across a large team can be a challenge. Not having the proper tools can stall workflows — decreasing productivity and efficiency. Workspaces and granular access controls allow your team to work together efficiently within Google Tag Manager. Multiple users can complete tagging updates at the same time and publish changes as they’re ready. Multi-environment testing lets you publish to different environments to ensure things are working as expected. I don't know about you but for me, every time I need to add a new script on my website I hesitate because I am afraid that my website will break and I would never know how to fix it. I wanted a solution where I could add a script on my own, test it and then publish it without any developer help. And then I found Google Tag Manager. Google Tag Manager lets you collaborate and work independently, at the same time, on the same website. You can publish a tag at the same time your marketing team-mate is creating an A/B testing experiment, all in the same GTM container. Large and small websites use Google Tag Manager to integrate and increase the value of their website. It is free, it is reliable and you find a lot of how-tos on the web so you can start using it right away. Google Tag Manager currently provides out-of-the-box integration with these ones: Universal Analytics - Google Analytics Classic Google Analytics - Google Analytics AdWords Conversion Tracking - AdWords AdWords Remarketing - AdWords DoubleClick Floodlight Counter - DoubleClick DoubleClick Floodlight Sales - DoubleClick Google Optimize - Google Optimize Google Surveys Website Satisfaction - Google Surveys AB TASTY Generic Tag Adometry AdRoll Affiliate Window Affiliate Window Audience Center 360 Bizrate Insights ClickTale comScore Crazy Egg Criteo Dstillery Eulerian Analytics Google Trusted Stores Hotjar Infinity Tracking Intent Media K50 LeadLab by wiredminds LinkedIn Marin Software Mediaplex Microsoft Bing Ads Mouseflow Neustar Nielsen Nudge Content Analytics Optimise Media OwnerListens Perfect Audience Personali Placed Inc. Pulse Insights Quantcast SaleCycle SearchForce Shareaholic Survicate Tradedoubler Turn Twitter Ve Interactive VisualDNA Yieldify This out-of-the-box integration doesn't require any special knowledge. And, for any other script that you might have, most of the providers have a how-to guide for integrating with Google Tag Manager. Have any questions about Google Tag Manager? Get in touch with our experts!   Get Social! Follow us on LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook and keep up-to-date with our Google Analytics insights.

2016-12-13

Top 6 pitfalls of Shopify analytics

The out-of-the-box analytics solution Shopify provides is a basic one, and unfortunately, the ecommerce data (transactions, add-to-carts, etc.) is incomplete and unreliable. With the help of Littledata, you can now be sure that "Shopify has you covered" with Analytics data collection. If you run a store with a large marketing budget you know how important it is to have accurate Analytics data to establish how your marketing budget is performing. It's also important to read the top 5 pitfalls in tracking ecommerce in Google Analytics as these will also apply to Shopify users. These are the known pitfalls for the out-of-the-box Analytics solution from Shopify: 1.Cross-domain and subdomain tracking issues The Shopify checkout is sending the customers to a Shopify domain (checkout.shopify.com). This makes the visitor sessions end suddenly even if they are in the process of buying something. The sales attribution for Shopify store owners is also painful due to the change of domains causing 'checkout.shopify.com' or a payment gateway to be attributed as the 'last click'. At the moment, Google Analytics can help you track both micro and macro moments in a customer journey. Example of micro-moments are: Clicking on a product link Viewing product details Impressions and clicks of internal promotions Adding / removing a product from a shopping cart Purchases and refunds All of these ecommerce interactions help you as a marketer / acquisition manager / owner to know more about your customer's interactions with your products. You can read more about the benefits of tracking the enhanced e-commerce in the article: use enhanced ecommerce to optimise product listings. 2.Clicking on a product link Clicking on a product link will show you the most appealing products, so you can improve the click-through-rate on the category page. If the click through rate is bad, the action to take is to check your product's master picture and see if there are any errors in getting to the product page. Also, you can investigate if these products are in the right category list. See how can you make these products more appealing to your audience. Read more on our blog on how to improve click-through-rate. 3.Viewing product details Viewing product details will show what are the most viewed product details. You can see this using the URL also, but having this info in a structured way (the product name and product SKU) will make the business analysis far easier. 4.Impressions and clicks on internal promotions Impressions and clicks on internal promotions. Every website uses at least one banner. But how many are tracking the effectiveness of these marketing assets? Knowing how they perform can mean a better visual strategy, a better usage of website space and maybe will save you some money when creating fancy banners with fancy designers! 5.Add-to-carts and removes from cart. Add-to-carts and removes from cart. Every store owner before Christmas asks themselves which products should have discounts or which to should be promoted? Finding out what products are added to cart and removed can answer some of those most vital questions in ecommerce. You can check your product picture and description and see if there are any errors on getting to the checkout. Also, be sure you give your customers access to the information about delivery and refunds. You can compare these products with your competition and see if the price and delivery costs are for the customer's advantage. See how can you make these products more appealing to the customer. 6.Purchases and refunds Purchases. The solution Littledata comes with is a server-side integration to provide a 100% match between your Shopify store and Google Analytics. This ensures that you register the sales data, even if the customer never gets to see the thank you page on your store. Refunds. We all know when seeing online sales, that it doesn't necessarily mean the end of the process. There can be a lower or higher percentage of returns from customers. Shopify is adding back the refunds on the day the packages return to the warehouse and this can be really sad for a normal day when there are negatives sales. There are multiple ways in which you can mess up your Google Analytics data while using Shopify but these were the most important ones to take in while tracking a Shopify store. Want more information on how we will help improve your Shopify analytics? Get in touch with our experts! Interested in joining the list to start a free trial? Sign up!   Get Social! Follow us on LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook and keep up-to-date with our Google Analytics insights.

2016-12-08

The referral exclusion list: what it is and how to update it?

The referral exclusion list is only available for properties using Universal Analytics ... so please make the jump and take advantage of the benefits! Let's find out how excluding referral traffic affects your data and how you can correct some of the wrong attributions of sales. By default, a referral automatically triggers a new session. When you exclude a referral source, traffic that arrives to your site from the excluded domain doesn’t trigger a new session. Because each referral triggers a new session, excluding referrals (or not excluding referrals) affects how sessions are calculated in your account. The same interaction can be counted as either one or two sessions, based on how you treat referrals. For example, a user on my-site.com goes to your-site.com and then returns to my-site.com. If you do not exclude your-site.com as a referring domain, two sessions are counted, one for each arrival at my-site.com. If, however, you exclude referrals from your-site.com, the second arrival to my-site.com does not trigger a new session, and only one session is counted. Common uses for referral exclusions list in Google Analytics: Third-party payment processors Cross-subdomain tracking If you add example.com to the list of referral exclusions, traffic from the domain example.com and the subdomain another.example.com are excluded. Traffic from another-example.com is not excluded. Only traffic from the domain entered in the referral exclusions list and any subdomains are excluded. Traffic from domains that only have substring matches are not excluded. How to add domains in the referral exclusion list: Sign in to your Gooogle Analytics account. Click admin in the menu bar at the top of any page. In the account column, use the drop-down to select the Google Analytics account that contains the property you want to work with. In the property column, use the drop-down to select a property. Click tracking info. Click referral exclusion list. To add a domain, click +add referral exclusion. Enter the domain name. Click create to save. The referral exclusion list used contains matching. For example, if you enter example.com, then traffic from sales.example.com is also excluded (because the domain name contains example.com). Need help with these steps? Get in touch with one of our experts and we'd be happy to assist you!   Get Social! Follow us on LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook and keep up-to-date with our Google Analytics insights.

2016-11-29

How to link Adwords and Google Analytics

If you are running an AdWords campaign you must have a Google Analytics account. We will show you how to link these two accounts so you can unleash the full reporting potential of both platforms. 1. Why should you link Analytics and AdWords? When you link Google Analytics and AdWords, you can: See ad and site performance data in the AdWords reports in Google Analytics. Import Google Analytics goals and ecommerce transactions directly into your AdWords account. Import valuable Analytics metrics—such as bounce rate, avg. session duration, and pages/session—into your AdWords account. Take advantage of enhanced remarketing capabilities. Get richer data in the Google Analytics multi-channel funnels reports. Use your Google Analytics data to enhance your AdWords experience. 2. How to link Google Analytics and AdWords The linking wizard makes it easy to link your AdWords account(s) to multiple views of your Google Analytics property. If you have multiple Google Analytics properties and want to link each of them to your AdWords account(s), just complete the linking wizard for each property. Sign into your Google Analytics account at www.google.com/analytics. Note: You can also quickly open Google Analytics from within your AdWords account. Click the tools tab, select analytics, and then follow the rest of these instructions. Click the admin tab at the top of the page. In the account column, select the analytics account that contains the property you want to link to one or more of your AdWords accounts. In the property column, select the analytics property you want to link, and click AdWords Linking. Use one of the following options to select the AdWords accounts you want to link with your analytics property. Select the checkbox next to any AdWords accounts you want to link with your analytics property. If you have an AdWords manager (MCC) account, select the checkbox next to the manager account to link it (and all of its child accounts) with your analytics property. If you want to link only a few managed accounts, expand the manager account by clicking the arrow next to it. Then, select the checkbox next to each of the managed AdWords accounts that you want to link. Or, click all linkable to select all of managed AdWords accounts under that MCC. You can then deselect individual accounts, and the other accounts will stay selected. Click the continue button. In the link configuration section, enter a link group title to identify your group of linked AdWords accounts. Note: Most users will only need one link group. We recommend creating multiple link groups only if you have multiple AdWords accounts and want data to flow in different ways between these accounts and your analytics property. For example, you should create multiple link groups if you need to either link different AdWords accounts to different views of the same Google Analytics property or enable auto-tagging for only some of your AdWords accounts. Select the Google Analytics views in which you want the AdWords data to be available. If you've already enabled auto-tagging in your AdWords account, skip to the next step. The account linking process will enable auto-tagging for all of your linked AdWords accounts. Click advanced settings only if you need to manually tag your AdWords links. Click the link accounts button. Congratulations! Your accounts are now linked. If you opted to keep auto-tagging turned on (recommended), Google Analytics will automatically start associating your AdWords data with customer clicks. For a deeper view and debugging you should also read the Google Analytics guide. Have any questions on setting this up? Get in touch and we'd be happy to help!   Get Social! Follow us on LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook and keep up-to-date with our Google Analytics insights.

2016-11-24

Who visited my website? Find out with Google Analytics

In every retail business, knowing your customers is vital to succeeding. All decisions you make about business and marketing strategies must begin from the user's perspective. Let's find out how we can build the user persona with the data that lies in Google Analytics. Even though Google's user profile is not as fancy as Facebook's, you can still have a pretty good idea about your customers. Let's start with the basics, and ask the most basic questions: How many of my customers are men or women? What is the age range of my customers? What devices do they use to access my website? How often do they visit my website? What are their interests? What makes them convert? For the first two questions, you should already have enabled Demographics and Interest reports in your Google account. If not, go to Admin > Property Settings > Enable Demographics and Interest reports. The split of age and sex can be seen in Audience > Demographics. The most interesting thing here is that you can add a second dimension to compare and see how people are different based on more than one vector. If you add a second dimension, such as Device Category, you will get a split like this: You can see from the above screenshot that females prefer mobile and are the majority user. Also when females are on desktop, they are more likely to spend more time on the website. You can go into more depth and analyse the conversion rate also. You can find out the behaviour of new vs. returning customers from the report, New vs. Returning under Audience. Add a second dimension "Gender" and you will see who's more likely to come back to your website. Based on the above screenshot, women are returning about 25% of the time, while men return about 21% of the time. Also, men have a higher bounce rate. Under Audience, you will also find the Frequency & Recency report and the Engagement report. If you create two new segments by gender: female and male, you will find who your most loyal visitors are. The interests (Google reads them from the user behaviour online) can be found under Audience > Interests. It is best to split the report based on females and males. You will now have a full view of your customers. And for the final and most important question: what makes them convert?, you can find this out by going to Aquisition > Channels. Add a second dimension by gender, age or interests and analyse the traffic for each channel. Find out what channel brings the most important users. In the screenshot below, you can see that woman are more likely to buy if the website is referred. This means that the reputation of the website is a big factor in their decision. Don't be shy when creating custom reports because you can drill down the data to multiple levels of understanding. Applying second dimensions has its limitations and you can see only a part of the information at once. If you still need a more detailed view of what each customer does on the website, we strongly recommend the User Explorer menu. We found it useful to find out how different touch points are important and how long the path is for a valuable customer. Also, it was useful in debugging and creating a marketing strategy based on the customer's flow. The bottom line is that you can answer "who is your customer?" with Google Analytics through its reports if you learn to see the report from different perspectives. Feel free to drop us a line if you use any other report that is relevant to this article!   Get Social! Follow us on LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook and keep up-to-date with our Google Analytics insights.

2016-11-17

Top 5 pitfalls in tracking ecommerce in Google Analytics

We all need our Google Analytics data to be correct and realistic. Ecommerce, just like any other website, needs correct data. What makes ecommerce websites more open to error is the ecommerce data capturing. We have put together a list of 5 mistakes in a Google Analytics integration that you should check before starting reporting on your online store! Top 5 pitfalls in tracking ecommerce in Google Analytics Tracking code is missing from some pages Multiple page views sent Multi- and subdomain tracking issues Wrong usage of UTM parameters Wrong usage of filters   Tracking code is missing from some pages The easy way for an established website to see if the tracking is complete is to go to Google Analytics > Acquisition > Referrals and search the report for the name of your website, as shown below. If you have a lot of pages and are not sure how to find which exact pages are missing the code, you can use the GA Checker.   Multiple page views sent The second most common issue we found is having multiple Google Analytics scripts on the same page. The easiest way to check this is with the Tag Assistant extension from chrome. Go on your website and inspect the page (see image below). You can also use the GA Checker for this. The solution is to leave only one script on the page. There are situations where you're sending data through Google Tag Manager. If you see 2 pageviews in Tag Assistant or gachecker.com, you should take a look at your tags. There should be only one for pageview tracking!   Multi- and Subdomain Tracking Issues Are you seeing sales attributed to your own website? Or your payment gateway? Then you have a cross-domain issue. And you can read all about it in our blog post: Why do you need cross-domain tracking?. You can see if this is the case by going to Acquisition > Overview > Source/Medium and find your domain name or payment provider.   Wrong usage of UTM parameters You should never tag your internal links with UTM parameters. If you do so every time a clients click's on a UTM tagged link, a new session and the original source will be overwritten. Pay attention to your campaign sources and search if something suspicious appears in the list. You'll find, you have internal links tagged when you will try to find the source of your transactions and find the name of the UTM parameters from your website instead. Read what UTM's are and why you should use them in our blog post: Why should you tag your campaigns?.   Wrong usage of filters Using filters will improve the accuracy of your data, however, data manipulated by your filters cannot be undone! To prevent your filter settings or experiments to permanently alter your traffic data you should set up separate views, and leave an unfiltered view with raw data just in case. Check your filters section and be sure you know each purpose. You can check more on this blog post: Your data is wrong from gravitatedesign.com. Need help with any of these common mistakes? Get in touch and we'd be happy to help!   Get Social! Follow us on LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook and keep up-to-date with our Google Analytics insights.

2016-11-01

How to increase the product click-through rate

According to W3Techs, Google Analytics is being used by 52.9 percent of all websites on the internet, more than 10 times the next most popular analytics option, Yandex Metrics. But how do we really use the information in Google Analytics so we can increase our revenue? BuiltWith says that 69.5 percent of Quantcast’s Top 10,000 sites (based on traffic) are using Google Analytics, and 54.6 percent of the top million websites are those that it tracks. Most of the large websites use the information in Google Analytics to make strategic decisions about the product or information posted online. Ecommerce websites, in particular, have the possibility to improve their performance looking at ecommerce data available in Google Analytics. The Enhanced ecommerce tracking from Google Analytics is a complete revamp of the traditional ecommerce tracking in the sense that, it provides many more ways to collect and analyse ecommerce data. Enhanced e-commerce provides deep insight into e-commerce engagement of your users. You can read more on Google Support about what is possible with Enhance Ecommerce data. We will try to show you how you can optimise product listings using Enhance Ecommerce - the non-technical way. We assume that you already have the full ecommerce setup for Analytics in place and you already have access to data like this in your account: If you don't, it's worth going through this blog post: Set up Ecommerce tracking with Google Tag Manager. Also, before moving forward, you should generate the product listing performance reports based on the first part of this blog post: Use Enhanced Ecommerce to optimise product listings. As you've seen in the blog post mentioned above, having enhanced ecommerce data, gives you unlimited ways to react to the customer's behaviour. Starting with this graphic above, let's make a strategy to improve product listing and increase the website conversion rate. We have 3 situations First, we have the non-starters product category. These products never get clicked on within the list. Either there are incorrectly categorised, or the thumbnail / title doesn’t appeal to the audience. They need to be amended or removed. Second, we have the lucky products: quick sellers: these had an excellent add-to-cart rate, but did not get enough list clicks. Many of them were 'upsell items', and should be promoted as ‘you may also like this’. And last, poor converters: these had high click-through rates, but did not get added to cart. Either the product imaging, description or features need adjusting. We will focus on the non-starters and poor converters ones and give you a list of things to do. Non-starters As we mentioned before these products are never clicked. For these kinds of products, you should check and improve the following. Are they in the correct category? If not put adjust them! Does this product have the correct position on the category page? If is a product is important to you, don't leave it at the end of the category listing on page 100. Does this product have a picture? If yes, change it as it is clearly not performing. Is this product easy to find in the category when filters are applied? Is this product easy to find using the internal search of the website? Is this product part of an upsell or cross-sell strategy? Poor Convertors Are the pictures of this product clear and from all relevant angles? If this product is an expensive one, does it have a video showing the benefits? On this product page are there sufficient details about the product, their benefits, age limit, and so on? If this is an assembled type of product do you have the assembly e-book or mention that they will receive it with the package? Do you mention, on a scale, how hard it is to assemble this product? Do you have reviews from previous customers that describe this product? Do you make all the costs of this product clear, including VAT, shipping, and other taxes? Is your add-to-cart button on this page working? Is the flow from add-to-cart to check out a smooth one, with no errors, and no "out of stock" notice? Do you use retargeting if the client sees a product multiple times but doesn't seem to add it to the basket? If you have other suggestions for the list above fell free to send us your ideas and we will update it. If you are interested in setting up Enhanced Ecommerce to get this kind of data or need help with marketing analytics then please get in touch!   Get Social! Follow us on LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook and keep up-to-date with our Google Analytics insights.

2016-10-25

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