Top 5 Google Analytics metrics Shopify stores can use to improve conversion

Stop using vanity metrics to measure your website's performance! The pros are using 5 detailed metrics in the customer conversion journey to measure and improve. Pageviews or time-on-site are bad ways to measure visitor engagement. Your visitors could view a lot of pages, yet be unable to find the right product, or seem to spend a long time on site, but be confused about the shipping rates. Here are the 5 better metrics, and how they help you improve your Shopify store: 1. Product list click-through rate Of the products viewed in a list or category page, how many click through to see the product details? Products need good images, naming and pricing to even get considered by your visitors. If a product has a low click-through rate, relative to other products in the list, then you know either the image, title or price is wrong. Like-wise, products with very high list click-through, but low purchases, may be hidden gems that you could promote on your homepage and recommended lists to increase revenue. If traffic from a particular campaign or keyword has a low click-through rate overall, then the marketing message may be a bad match with the products offered – similar to having a high bounce rate. 2. Add-to-cart rate Of the product details viewed, how many products were added to the cart? If visitors to your store normally land straight on the product details page, or you have a low number of SKUs, then the add-to-cart rate is more useful. A low add-to-cart rate could be caused by uncompetitive pricing, a weak product description, or issues with the detailed features of the product. Obviously, it will also drop if you have limited variants (sizes or colours) in stock. Again, it’s worth looking at whether particular marketing campaigns have lower add-to-cart rates, as it means that particular audience just isn’t interested in your product. 3. Cart to Checkout rate Number of checkout processes started, divided by the number of sessions where a product is added to cart A low rate may indicate that customers are shopping around for products – they add to cart, but then go to check a similar product on another site. It could also mean customers are unclear about shipping or return options before they decide to pay. Is the rate especially low for customers from a particular country, or products with unusual shipping costs? 4. Checkout conversion rate Number of visitors paying for their cart, divided by those that start the process Shopify provides a standard checkout process, optimised for ease of transaction, but the conversion rate can still vary between sites, depending on payment options and desire. Put simply: if your product is a must-have, customers will jump through any hoops to complete the checkout. Yet for impulse purchases, or luxury items, any tiny flaws in the checkout experience will reduce conversion. Is the checkout conversion worse for particular geographies? It could be that shipping or payment options are worrying users. Does using an order coupon or voucher at checkout increase the conversion rate? With Littledata’s app you can split out the checkout steps to decide if the issue is shipping or payment. 5. Refund rate Percent of transactions refunded Refunds are a growing issue for all ecommerce but especially fashion retail. You legally have to honour refunds, but are you taking them into account in your marketing analysis? If your refund rate is high, and you base your return on advertising spend on gross sales (before refunds), then you risk burning cash on promoting to customers who just return the product. The refund rate is also essential for merchandising: aside from quality issues, was an often-refunded product badly described or promoted on the site, leading to false expectations? Conclusion If you’re not finding it easy to get a clear picture of these 5 steps, we're in the process of developing Littledata’s new Shopify app. You can join the list to be the first to get a free trial! We ensure all of the above metrics are accurate in Google Analytics, and the outliers can then be analysed in our Pro reports. You can also benchmark your store performance against stores in similar sectors, to decide if there are tweaks to the store template or promotions you need to make. Have more questions? Comment below or get in touch with our lovely team of Google Analytics experts!   Get Social! Follow us on LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook and keep up-to-date with our Google Analytics insights.

2016-11-30

What are Enhanced Ecommerce reports?

In May 2014 Google Analytics introduced a new feature: Enhanced Ecommerce tracking. If you run an ecommerce operation, this gets you much more detailed feedback on your checkout process. What will I see? Shopping behaviour: how are people converting from browsers to purchasers? Checkout behaviour: at what stage of your checkout do buyers abandon the process Product performance: which products are driving your sales, and which have a high return rate Real campaign returns: see your real return on marketing investment including promotional discounts and returns How do I set this up? The bad news is it definitely requires an experienced software developer for the setup. The reports require lots of extra product and customer information to be sent to Google Analytics. You can read the full developer information on what you can track, or our own simpler guide for tracking ecommerce via Tag Manager. However, if you already have standard ecommerce tracking and Google Tag Manager, we can set Enhanced reports up in a couple of days with no code changes on your live site - so no business disruption or risk of lost sales. Is it worth implementing? Imagine you could identify a drop-off stage in your checkout process where you could get a 10% improvement in sales conversion or a group of customers who were unable to buy (maybe due to language or browser difficulties) – what would that be worth? Many businesses have that kind of barrier just waiting to be discovered…   Get Social! Follow us on LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook and keep up-to-date with our Google Analytics insights.

2016-11-14

How to set up ecommerce tracking with Google Tag Manager

Enhanced ecommerce tracking requires your developers to send lots of extra product and checkout information in a way that Google Analytics can understand. If you already use GTM to track pageviews you must send ecommerce data via Google Tag Manager Step 1 Enable enhanced ecommerce reporting in the Google Analytics view admin setting, under 'Ecommerce Settings' Step 2 Select names for your checkout steps (see point 4 below): Step 3 Get your developers to push the product data behind the scenes to the page 'dataLayer'. Here is the developer guide. Step 4 Make sure the following steps are tracked as a pageview or event, and for each step set up a Universal Analytics tracking tag: Product impressions (typically a category or listing page) Product detail view (the product page) Add to basket (more usually an event than a page) Checkout step 1 (views the checkout page) Checkout step 2 etc - whatever registration, shipping or tax steps you have Purchase confirmation Step 5 Edit each tag, and under 'More Settings' section, select the 'Enable enhanced ecommerce features' and then 'use data layer' options: Of course, there's often a bit of fiddling to get the data layer in the right format, and the ecommerce events fires at the right time, so please contact us if you need more help setting up the reports! Step 6 - Checking it is working There is no 'real time' ecommerce reporting yet, so you'll need to wait a day for events to process and then view the shopping behaviour and checkout behaviour reports. If you want to check the checkout options you'll need to set up a custom report: use 'checkout options' as the dimension and 'sessions' and 'transactions' as the metrics. Need some more help? Get in touch with our lovely team of experts and we'd be happy to answer any questions!   Get Social! Follow us on LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook and keep up-to-date with our Google Analytics insights.  

2016-11-10

Android users buy 4x more than Apple users. Why?

Looking at a sample of 400 ecommerce websites using Littledata, we found mobile ecommerce conversion rates vary hugely between operating systems. For Apple devices, it is only 1% (and 0.6% for the iPhone 6), whereas for Android devices the conversion rate is nearly 4% (better than desktop). It’s become accepted wisdom that a great ‘mobile experience’ is essential for serious online retailers. As 60% of all Google searches now happen on mobile, and over 80% of Facebook ad clicks come from mobile, it’s highly likely the first experience new customers have of your store is on their phone. So is it because most websites look worse on an iPhone, or iPhone users are pickier?! There’s something else going on: conversion rate on mobile actually dropped for these same sites from July to October (1.25% to 1.26%) this year, even as the share of mobile traffic increased. Whereas on desktop, from July (low-season) to October (mid-season for most retailers), the average ecommerce conversion rate jumped from 2% to 2.5%. It seems during holiday-time, consumers are more willing to use their phones to purchase (perhaps because they are away from their desks). So the difference between Android and iOS is likely to do with cross-device attribution. The enduring problem of ecommerce attribution is that it’s less likely that customers complete the purchase journey on their phone. And on an ecommerce store you usually can’t attribute the purchase to the initial visit on their phone, meaning you are seriously underestimating the value of your mobile traffic. I think iPhone users are more likely to own a second device (and a third if you count the iPad), and so can more easily switch from small screen browsing to purchase on a large screen. Whereas Android users are less likely to own a second device, and so purchase on one device. That means iPhone users do purchase – but you just can’t track them as well. What’s the solution? The only way to link the visits on a phone with the subsequent purchases on another device is to have some login functionality. You can do that by getting users to subscribe to an email list, and then linking that email to their Google Analytics sessions. Or offering special discounts for users that create an account. But next time your data tells you it’s not worth marketing to iPhone users, think again. Need help with your Google Analytics set up? Comment below or get in touch!   Get Social! Follow us on LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook and keep up-to-date with our Google Analytics insights.  

2016-11-02

Top 5 pitfalls in tracking ecommerce in Google Analytics

We all need our Google Analytics data to be correct and realistic. Ecommerce, just like any other website, needs correct data. What makes ecommerce websites more open to error is the ecommerce data capturing. We have put together a list of 5 mistakes in a Google Analytics integration that you should check before starting reporting on your online store! Top 5 pitfalls in tracking ecommerce in Google Analytics Tracking code is missing from some pages Multiple page views sent Multi- and subdomain tracking issues Wrong usage of UTM parameters Wrong usage of filters   Tracking code is missing from some pages The easy way for an established website to see if the tracking is complete is to go to Google Analytics > Acquisition > Referrals and search the report for the name of your website, as shown below. If you have a lot of pages and are not sure how to find which exact pages are missing the code, you can use the GA Checker.   Multiple page views sent The second most common issue we found is having multiple Google Analytics scripts on the same page. The easiest way to check this is with the Tag Assistant extension from chrome. Go on your website and inspect the page (see image below). You can also use the GA Checker for this. The solution is to leave only one script on the page. There are situations where you're sending data through Google Tag Manager. If you see 2 pageviews in Tag Assistant or gachecker.com, you should take a look at your tags. There should be only one for pageview tracking!   Multi- and Subdomain Tracking Issues Are you seeing sales attributed to your own website? Or your payment gateway? Then you have a cross-domain issue. And you can read all about it in our blog post: Why do you need cross-domain tracking?. You can see if this is the case by going to Acquisition > Overview > Source/Medium and find your domain name or payment provider.   Wrong usage of UTM parameters You should never tag your internal links with UTM parameters. If you do so every time a clients click's on a UTM tagged link, a new session and the original source will be overwritten. Pay attention to your campaign sources and search if something suspicious appears in the list. You'll find, you have internal links tagged when you will try to find the source of your transactions and find the name of the UTM parameters from your website instead. Read what UTM's are and why you should use them in our blog post: Why should you tag your campaigns?.   Wrong usage of filters Using filters will improve the accuracy of your data, however, data manipulated by your filters cannot be undone! To prevent your filter settings or experiments to permanently alter your traffic data you should set up separate views, and leave an unfiltered view with raw data just in case. Check your filters section and be sure you know each purpose. You can check more on this blog post: Your data is wrong from gravitatedesign.com. Need help with any of these common mistakes? Get in touch and we'd be happy to help!   Get Social! Follow us on LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook and keep up-to-date with our Google Analytics insights.

2016-11-01

How to increase the product click-through rate

According to W3Techs, Google Analytics is being used by 52.9 percent of all websites on the internet, more than 10 times the next most popular analytics option, Yandex Metrics. But how do we really use the information in Google Analytics so we can increase our revenue? BuiltWith says that 69.5 percent of Quantcast’s Top 10,000 sites (based on traffic) are using Google Analytics, and 54.6 percent of the top million websites are those that it tracks. Most of the large websites use the information in Google Analytics to make strategic decisions about the product or information posted online. Ecommerce websites, in particular, have the possibility to improve their performance looking at ecommerce data available in Google Analytics. The Enhanced ecommerce tracking from Google Analytics is a complete revamp of the traditional ecommerce tracking in the sense that, it provides many more ways to collect and analyse ecommerce data. Enhanced e-commerce provides deep insight into e-commerce engagement of your users. You can read more on Google Support about what is possible with Enhance Ecommerce data. We will try to show you how you can optimise product listings using Enhance Ecommerce - the non-technical way. We assume that you already have the full ecommerce setup for Analytics in place and you already have access to data like this in your account: If you don't, it's worth going through this blog post: Set up Ecommerce tracking with Google Tag Manager. Also, before moving forward, you should generate the product listing performance reports based on the first part of this blog post: Use Enhanced Ecommerce to optimise product listings. As you've seen in the blog post mentioned above, having enhanced ecommerce data, gives you unlimited ways to react to the customer's behaviour. Starting with this graphic above, let's make a strategy to improve product listing and increase the website conversion rate. We have 3 situations First, we have the non-starters product category. These products never get clicked on within the list. Either there are incorrectly categorised, or the thumbnail / title doesn’t appeal to the audience. They need to be amended or removed. Second, we have the lucky products: quick sellers: these had an excellent add-to-cart rate, but did not get enough list clicks. Many of them were 'upsell items', and should be promoted as ‘you may also like this’. And last, poor converters: these had high click-through rates, but did not get added to cart. Either the product imaging, description or features need adjusting. We will focus on the non-starters and poor converters ones and give you a list of things to do. Non-starters As we mentioned before these products are never clicked. For these kinds of products, you should check and improve the following. Are they in the correct category? If not put adjust them! Does this product have the correct position on the category page? If is a product is important to you, don't leave it at the end of the category listing on page 100. Does this product have a picture? If yes, change it as it is clearly not performing. Is this product easy to find in the category when filters are applied? Is this product easy to find using the internal search of the website? Is this product part of an upsell or cross-sell strategy? Poor Convertors Are the pictures of this product clear and from all relevant angles? If this product is an expensive one, does it have a video showing the benefits? On this product page are there sufficient details about the product, their benefits, age limit, and so on? If this is an assembled type of product do you have the assembly e-book or mention that they will receive it with the package? Do you mention, on a scale, how hard it is to assemble this product? Do you have reviews from previous customers that describe this product? Do you make all the costs of this product clear, including VAT, shipping, and other taxes? Is your add-to-cart button on this page working? Is the flow from add-to-cart to check out a smooth one, with no errors, and no "out of stock" notice? Do you use retargeting if the client sees a product multiple times but doesn't seem to add it to the basket? If you have other suggestions for the list above fell free to send us your ideas and we will update it. If you are interested in setting up Enhanced Ecommerce to get this kind of data or need help with marketing analytics then please get in touch!   Get Social! Follow us on LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook and keep up-to-date with our Google Analytics insights.

2016-10-25

How to use Littledata's software to monitor ecommerce performance

Littledata provides daily insights in your inbox. These include alerts on significant changes to your web traffic, tips on better tracking, and longer term trends in a daily summary email. All this, along with advice on how to act, will improve your ecommerce performance. Key performance indicators (KPIs) are the milestones to online success of an ecommerce store. Monitoring them will help ecommerce entrepreneurs identify problems and find solutions for better sales, marketing, and customer service goals. Once you have set goals and selected KPIs, monitoring those indicators should become an everyday exercise. And most importantly: performance should inform business decisions, and you should use KPIs to drive actions. Here are the most used reports in our Littledata software that monitor ecommerce performance: Sales Key Performance Indicators Hourly, daily, weekly, monthly Our web app generates reports, based on your traffic volume, on a daily, weekly, monthly or hourly schedule. This helps you keep up to pace with your campaign changes, your developer's releases, and your new interface changes. This way, you can react fast to changes. If your campaign is performing badly, you can see it at once and change it. If your developers release something and it breaks a page or the tracking code, you will see it fast and can correct it. Conversions The efficacy of conversion marketing is measured by the conversion rate, i.e. the number of customers who have completed a transaction divided by the total number of website visitors. The conversion rate is influenced by multiple factors. We track the conversion performance with reports like: Performance of the mobile devices Find out if you have errors on particular devices and check how the user can progress through the checkout flow on these devices. You may have some blocking steps on these particular phones or tablets like coding incompatibilities or a bad user interface. Campaign performance Find out how your new campaign is doing compared with the benchmark. We compare your campaign performance across all campaigns of its kind from your own website and others so you will know where to improve the moment the information is vital. Goal and purchases evolution across time Find out what days are the best for your sale and what days are the worst and schedule your budgets and actions accordingly. Read more about setting up goals in: 'Setting up a destination goal funnel' or find out about using Enhanced Ecommerce to optimise product listings. Marketing Key Performance Indicators: Site traffic In ecommerce, part of the conversion rate equation is the site traffic, which makes monitoring the amount of people that get on a website a big thing. We monitor the performance of the website traffic in multiple reports divided by other segments. The segments monitored can be turned on and off in the Control Panel section of each account under segments. The segments currently available are Direct, Paid Search, Organic Search, Referral, Email, Mobile and Tablet. Segmentation of your traffic puts light on what channels fluctuate at some point in time so you can correct it. Page views per visit Average page views per visit are an excellent indicator of how compelling and easily navigated your content is. The formula is the total number of page views divided by the total number of visits during the same timeframe. Sophisticated users may also want to calculate average page views per visit for different visitor segments. We track the page views per visit across your website and compare them with your benchmark so you can see if the customer journey can be more easy and compelling. Traffic source We track each channel that brings you traffic and spot when traffic sources drop or spike. We have a smart reporting system that calculates traffic sources from different segments so you can see each traffic source fluctuations, giving you the opportunity to react promptly. Have any questions about these reports? Just contact us and ask!   Further reading: Auditing web analytics ecommerce tracking Attributing goals and conversions to marketing channels Why do you need cross domain tracking

2016-09-14

Vital Google Analytics custom reports and dashboards for ecommerce

Standard reports are useful to an extent. Custom reports and dashboards, on the other hand, allow you to compile metrics that give you much more useful insights of how your online shop is performing. Monitoring and reviewing the right data is essential for deciding which tactics or initiatives you should try, or marketing platforms to focus on, to help you sell more. If you are very familiar with how Google Analytics (GA) works, then you would set up some custom reports and dashboards to quickly access your key metrics. But if you are not as knowledgeable about the quirks and inner workings of GA then you should take advantage of the many custom reports and dashboards available for import. We can also help you build custom dashboards. There is a huge number of reports available in Google Analytics Solutions Gallery; used, created and shared by experts. They’re all done from scratch and designed to maximise your use of Google Analytics, but the huge amount of solutions from dashboards and channel groupings to segments and custom reports do require some time to find what’s right for your needs. From our experience setting up ecommerce tracking and reports for companies like MADE.com, British Red Cross Training, Pensions and Lifetime Savings Association, these reports and dashboards are valuable when analysing purchase data. Don't lose sight of your conversion rate Keep an eye on your ecommerce conversion rate across five different tabs covering channels, keyword, mobile devices, cities and campaigns. Focussed on high traffic sources, each section shows where it's not up to scratch and needs your attention and tweaking. Get ecommerce conversion rate performance custom report. Find duplicate transactions Duplicate transactions can greatly skew your numbers and affect your reporting, making you doubt the accuracy of your data. Duplicate order data is sent to Google Analytics typically because the page containing such information has been loaded twice. This can happen when the page is refreshed or loaded again. To find whether your data contains duplicate transactions, add our custom report to the view you want to check. Get a custom report to check for duplicate transactions. If you have more than 1 transaction in any row (or per an individual transaction ID), that means you have duplicate transactions stored in your data. It’s worth checking the report on a regular basis, eg monthly, to make sure that there are no duplicates or they’re kept to the minimum. Lunametrics blog has a number of suggestions for how to fix duplicate transactions. Overview of ecommerce performance This overview dashboard brings important top level metrics into one place, so you don’t have to go searching for them in multiple reports. You will quickly see which of your campaigns, channels, and sources are bringing in the most revenue, whilst comparing conversion rates across each. Get ecommerce overview dashboard. How is your store content performing See how your customers are engaging with your site, content and product (or page, depending on the setup) categories. You'll get information on what they search for, and which categories and landing pages bring in the most revenue. Get ecommerce content performance dashboard.   Looking for improving your ecommerce tracking and reporting? Get in touch with our qualified experts.   Further reading: Take your ecommerce website to the next level Attributing goals and conversions to marketing channels Tips to optimise your ecommerce landing pages Image credit: Image courtesy of Juralmin at Pixabay

2016-09-05

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