Android users buy 4x more than Apple users. Why?

Looking at a sample of 400 ecommerce websites using Littledata, we found mobile ecommerce conversion rates vary hugely between operating systems. For Apple devices, it is only 1% (and 0.6% for the iPhone 6), whereas for Android devices the conversion rate is nearly 4% (better than desktop). It’s become accepted wisdom that a great ‘mobile experience’ is essential for serious online retailers. As 60% of all Google searches now happen on mobile, and over 80% of Facebook ad clicks come from mobile, it’s highly likely the first experience new customers have of your store is on their phone. So is it because most websites look worse on an iPhone, or iPhone users are pickier?! There’s something else going on: conversion rate on mobile actually dropped for these same sites from July to October (1.25% to 1.26%) this year, even as the share of mobile traffic increased. Whereas on desktop, from July (low-season) to October (mid-season for most retailers), the average ecommerce conversion rate jumped from 2% to 2.5%. It seems during holiday-time, consumers are more willing to use their phones to purchase (perhaps because they are away from their desks). So the difference between Android and iOS is likely to do with cross-device attribution. The enduring problem of ecommerce attribution is that it’s less likely that customers complete the purchase journey on their phone. And on an ecommerce store you usually can’t attribute the purchase to the initial visit on their phone, meaning you are seriously underestimating the value of your mobile traffic. I think iPhone users are more likely to own a second device (and a third if you count the iPad), and so can more easily switch from small screen browsing to purchase on a large screen. Whereas Android users are less likely to own a second device, and so purchase on one device. That means iPhone users do purchase – but you just can’t track them as well. What’s the solution? The only way to link the visits on a phone with the subsequent purchases on another device is to have some login functionality. You can do that by getting users to subscribe to an email list, and then linking that email to their Google Analytics sessions. Or offering special discounts for users that create an account. But next time your data tells you it’s not worth marketing to iPhone users, think again. Need help with your Google Analytics set up? Comment below or get in touch!   Get Social! Follow us on LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook and keep up-to-date with our Google Analytics insights.  

2016-11-02

Top 5 pitfalls of tracking ecommerce in Google Analytics

We all need our Google Analytics data to be correct and realistic. Online stores, just like any other website, needs correct data to make optimal marketing and sales decisions. What makes ecommerce websites more open to error, however, is ecommerce data capturing. We have put together a list of 5 mistakes of Google Analytics integrations that are worth checking. With faulty or incomplete tracking, not only will your monthly reporting suffer: Poor/inaccurate reporting likely hurts your order volume and sales revenue Poor tracking from Shopify to Google Analytics means you might invest more in low-return marketing channels while missing out on more high-quality leads from better channels Your lack of accurate marketing attribution can hurt your bottom line and more [tip]Learn about data mismatches between Shopify <> Google Analytics...and how to fix them![/tip] Here are the top 5 pitfalls of ecommerce tracking (including Shopify tracking) that we've found in Google Analytics: Tracking code is missing from some pages Multiple page views sent Multi- and subdomain tracking issues Wrong usage of UTM parameters Wrong usage of filters 1. Tracking code is missing from some pages The easy way to check if your tracking setup is complete is to go to Google Analytics > Acquisition > Referrals and search the report for the name of your website:. If you have a lot of pages and are not sure how to find which exact pages are missing the code, you can use the GA Checker. 2. Multiple page views sent The second most common issue we found is having multiple Google Analytics scripts on the same page. The easiest way to check this is with the Google Tag Assistant extension from Chrome. On your online store, inspect the page (see image below). You can also use the GA Checker for this. The solution is to leave only one script on the page. There are situations where you're sending data through Google Tag Manager. If you see 2 pageviews in Tag Assistant or gachecker.com, you should take a look at your tags. There should be only one for pageview tracking! 3. Multi- and subdomain tracking issues Are you seeing sales attributed to your own website? Or your payment gateway? Then you have a cross-domain issue. Here's how to set up cross-domain tracking in Google Analytics. To make sure you don't have a blocker with cross-domain tracking, go to Acquisition > Overview > Source/Medium and find your domain name or payment provider. 4. Wrong usage of UTM parameters You should never tag your internal links with UTM parameters. If you do, every time a customer clicks on a UTM-tagged link, a new session will overwrite the original source, which means you can't accurately trace back your shoppers to the marketing channels that brought them to your site in the first place. Pay attention to your campaign sources and search if something suspicious appears in the list. When you look for the source of your orders, you'll may find the name of the UTM parameters from your website instead. If so, here's how you can avoid this issue.  5. Wrong usage of filters Using filters will improve the accuracy of your data. However, data manipulated by your filters cannot be undone! To prevent your filter settings or experiments to permanently alter your traffic data, you should set up separate views in Google Analytics and leave an unfiltered view with raw data just in case. Check your filters section and be sure you know each purpose. Here's how you can set up your filters correctly. Need help with any of these common mistakes? Get in touch and we'd be happy to help! Our team of ecommerce experts and Google Analytics consultants is here to help. ?

2016-11-01

How to increase the product click-through rate

According to W3Techs, Google Analytics is being used by 52.9 percent of all websites on the internet, more than 10 times the next most popular analytics option, Yandex Metrics. But how do we really use the information in Google Analytics so we can increase our revenue? BuiltWith says that 69.5 percent of Quantcast’s Top 10,000 sites (based on traffic) are using Google Analytics, and 54.6 percent of the top million websites are those that it tracks. Most of the large websites use the information in Google Analytics to make strategic decisions about the product or information posted online. Ecommerce websites, in particular, have the possibility to improve their performance looking at ecommerce data available in Google Analytics. The Enhanced ecommerce tracking from Google Analytics is a complete revamp of the traditional ecommerce tracking in the sense that, it provides many more ways to collect and analyse ecommerce data. Enhanced e-commerce provides deep insight into e-commerce engagement of your users. You can read more on Google Support about what is possible with Enhance Ecommerce data. We will try to show you how you can optimise product listings using Enhance Ecommerce - the non-technical way. We assume that you already have the full ecommerce setup for Analytics in place and you already have access to data like this in your account: If you don't, it's worth going through this blog post: Set up Ecommerce tracking with Google Tag Manager. Also, before moving forward, you should generate the product listing performance reports based on the first part of this blog post: Use Enhanced Ecommerce to optimise product listings. As you've seen in the blog post mentioned above, having enhanced ecommerce data, gives you unlimited ways to react to the customer's behaviour. Starting with this graphic above, let's make a strategy to improve product listing and increase the website conversion rate. We have 3 situations First, we have the non-starters product category. These products never get clicked on within the list. Either there are incorrectly categorised, or the thumbnail / title doesn’t appeal to the audience. They need to be amended or removed. Second, we have the lucky products: quick sellers: these had an excellent add-to-cart rate, but did not get enough list clicks. Many of them were 'upsell items', and should be promoted as ‘you may also like this’. And last, poor converters: these had high click-through rates, but did not get added to cart. Either the product imaging, description or features need adjusting. We will focus on the non-starters and poor converters ones and give you a list of things to do. Non-starters As we mentioned before these products are never clicked. For these kinds of products, you should check and improve the following. Are they in the correct category? If not put adjust them! Does this product have the correct position on the category page? If is a product is important to you, don't leave it at the end of the category listing on page 100. Does this product have a picture? If yes, change it as it is clearly not performing. Is this product easy to find in the category when filters are applied? Is this product easy to find using the internal search of the website? Is this product part of an upsell or cross-sell strategy? Poor Convertors Are the pictures of this product clear and from all relevant angles? If this product is an expensive one, does it have a video showing the benefits? On this product page are there sufficient details about the product, their benefits, age limit, and so on? If this is an assembled type of product do you have the assembly e-book or mention that they will receive it with the package? Do you mention, on a scale, how hard it is to assemble this product? Do you have reviews from previous customers that describe this product? Do you make all the costs of this product clear, including VAT, shipping, and other taxes? Is your add-to-cart button on this page working? Is the flow from add-to-cart to check out a smooth one, with no errors, and no "out of stock" notice? Do you use retargeting if the client sees a product multiple times but doesn't seem to add it to the basket? If you have other suggestions for the list above fell free to send us your ideas and we will update it. If you are interested in setting up Enhanced Ecommerce to get this kind of data or need help with marketing analytics then please get in touch!   Get Social! Follow us on LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook and keep up-to-date with our Google Analytics insights.

2016-10-25

How to use Littledata's software to monitor ecommerce performance

Littledata provides daily insights in your inbox. These include alerts on significant changes to your web traffic, tips on better tracking, and longer term trends in a daily summary email. All this, along with advice on how to act, will improve your ecommerce performance. Key performance indicators (KPIs) are the milestones to online success of an ecommerce store. Monitoring them will help ecommerce entrepreneurs identify problems and find solutions for better sales, marketing, and customer service goals. Once you have set goals and selected KPIs, monitoring those indicators should become an everyday exercise. And most importantly: performance should inform business decisions, and you should use KPIs to drive actions. Here are the most used reports in our Littledata software that monitor ecommerce performance: Sales Key Performance Indicators Hourly, daily, weekly, monthly Our web app generates reports, based on your traffic volume, on a daily, weekly, monthly or hourly schedule. This helps you keep up to pace with your campaign changes, your developer's releases, and your new interface changes. This way, you can react fast to changes. If your campaign is performing badly, you can see it at once and change it. If your developers release something and it breaks a page or the tracking code, you will see it fast and can correct it. Conversions The efficacy of conversion marketing is measured by the conversion rate, i.e. the number of customers who have completed a transaction divided by the total number of website visitors. The conversion rate is influenced by multiple factors. We track the conversion performance with reports like: Performance of the mobile devices Find out if you have errors on particular devices and check how the user can progress through the checkout flow on these devices. You may have some blocking steps on these particular phones or tablets like coding incompatibilities or a bad user interface. Campaign performance Find out how your new campaign is doing compared with the benchmark. We compare your campaign performance across all campaigns of its kind from your own website and others so you will know where to improve the moment the information is vital. Goal and purchases evolution across time Find out what days are the best for your sale and what days are the worst and schedule your budgets and actions accordingly. Read more about setting up goals in: 'Setting up a destination goal funnel' or find out about using Enhanced Ecommerce to optimise product listings. Marketing Key Performance Indicators: Site traffic In ecommerce, part of the conversion rate equation is the site traffic, which makes monitoring the amount of people that get on a website a big thing. We monitor the performance of the website traffic in multiple reports divided by other segments. The segments monitored can be turned on and off in the Control Panel section of each account under segments. The segments currently available are Direct, Paid Search, Organic Search, Referral, Email, Mobile and Tablet. Segmentation of your traffic puts light on what channels fluctuate at some point in time so you can correct it. Page views per visit Average page views per visit are an excellent indicator of how compelling and easily navigated your content is. The formula is the total number of page views divided by the total number of visits during the same timeframe. Sophisticated users may also want to calculate average page views per visit for different visitor segments. We track the page views per visit across your website and compare them with your benchmark so you can see if the customer journey can be more easy and compelling. Traffic source We track each channel that brings you traffic and spot when traffic sources drop or spike. We have a smart reporting system that calculates traffic sources from different segments so you can see each traffic source fluctuations, giving you the opportunity to react promptly. Have any questions about these reports? Just contact us and ask!   Further reading: Auditing web analytics ecommerce tracking Attributing goals and conversions to marketing channels Why do you need cross domain tracking

2016-09-14

Vital Google Analytics custom reports and dashboards for ecommerce

Standard reports are useful to an extent. Custom reports and dashboards, on the other hand, allow you to compile metrics that give you much more useful insights of how your online shop is performing. Monitoring and reviewing the right data is essential for deciding which tactics or initiatives you should try, or marketing platforms to focus on, to help you sell more. If you are very familiar with how Google Analytics (GA) works, then you would set up some custom reports and dashboards to quickly access your key metrics. But if you are not as knowledgeable about the quirks and inner workings of GA then you should take advantage of the many custom reports and dashboards available for import. We can also help you build custom dashboards. There is a huge number of reports available in Google Analytics Solutions Gallery; used, created and shared by experts. They’re all done from scratch and designed to maximise your use of Google Analytics, but the huge amount of solutions from dashboards and channel groupings to segments and custom reports do require some time to find what’s right for your needs. From our experience setting up ecommerce tracking and reports for companies like MADE.com, British Red Cross Training, Pensions and Lifetime Savings Association, these reports and dashboards are valuable when analysing purchase data. Don't lose sight of your conversion rate Keep an eye on your ecommerce conversion rate across five different tabs covering channels, keyword, mobile devices, cities and campaigns. Focussed on high traffic sources, each section shows where it's not up to scratch and needs your attention and tweaking. Get ecommerce conversion rate performance custom report. Find duplicate transactions Duplicate transactions can greatly skew your numbers and affect your reporting, making you doubt the accuracy of your data. Duplicate order data is sent to Google Analytics typically because the page containing such information has been loaded twice. This can happen when the page is refreshed or loaded again. To find whether your data contains duplicate transactions, add our custom report to the view you want to check. Get a custom report to check for duplicate transactions. If you have more than 1 transaction in any row (or per an individual transaction ID), that means you have duplicate transactions stored in your data. It’s worth checking the report on a regular basis, eg monthly, to make sure that there are no duplicates or they’re kept to the minimum. Lunametrics blog has a number of suggestions for how to fix duplicate transactions. Overview of ecommerce performance This overview dashboard brings important top level metrics into one place, so you don’t have to go searching for them in multiple reports. You will quickly see which of your campaigns, channels, and sources are bringing in the most revenue, whilst comparing conversion rates across each. Get ecommerce overview dashboard. How is your store content performing See how your customers are engaging with your site, content and product (or page, depending on the setup) categories. You'll get information on what they search for, and which categories and landing pages bring in the most revenue. Get ecommerce content performance dashboard.   Looking for improving your ecommerce tracking and reporting? Get in touch with our qualified experts.   Further reading: Take your ecommerce website to the next level Attributing goals and conversions to marketing channels Tips to optimise your ecommerce landing pages Image credit: Image courtesy of Juralmin at Pixabay

2016-09-05

Why do I need ecommerce tracking?

Only by using Google Analytics ecommerce tracking, can you match real sales data with website usage (including traffic source/medium). This sales analysis is required to understand the performance of your website landing pages and return-on-investment from marketing campaigns. The ecommerce reports allow you to analyse purchase activity on your site or app. You can see which products were bought, average order value, ecommerce conversion rate, time to purchase, discount vouchers used and checkout process funnels. Ecommerce tracking is useful not just for online shops but for all kinds of websites including event booking, courses / education, travel / hotels and so on. To see ecommerce data in Google Analytics, you need to: Enable ecommerce in Google Analytics Add the code to your site/app to collect ecommerce data. To complete this task, you'll need to be comfortable editing HTML and coding in JavaScript, or have help from an experienced web developer. Read how to Set up Ecommerce Tracking with Google Tag Manager. Based on this data, you can develop an understanding of: Which products sell well, and by inference, which products are best suited for your customer base. The revenue per transaction, and the number of products per transaction. For example, if the number of products per transaction is lower than you'd like, you might benefit from offering better quantity discounts, or offering free shipping if customers meet a minimum dollar amount. How long (in time and in the number of sessions) it takes customers to make the decision to purchase. If your sales cycle is stable or fluctuates predictably based on product or season, you can use this information (in conjunction with overall sales forecasts) to make reliable predictions about revenue. If customers routinely make numerous visits before they purchase, you might think about a site design that leads more easily to your purchase pages, or options that let users compare your products and prices to your competitors'. The difference between goals and ecommerce. A goal is only measured once in a visit. Think about it similar to pageviews vs. unique pageviews - once the goal has been 'triggered' to a visit, it can't be triggered again. On the other hand, there are no limitations on the number of transactions being measured during one session. Ecommerce is more powerful in that it allows you to analyse additional metrics.  For example, you can see how many visits occurred before the visitor decided to purchase. Many visitors on my site come back more than 7 times before they finally decide to purchase. Wow, interesting figures! Here is a list of the available metrics for ecommerce: If you have marketing campaigns and have no ecommerce tracking you are more likely struggling to calculate the return on your investment (ROI).  With both goals and ecommerce tracking, you will now have a full understanding of your customer journey and your customer life value (CLV). Analytics goals vs. ecommerce transactions, which to choose? Both of them!  If you have read my post carefully, you will understand that both of them have their strengths and limitations. We strongly advise to implement and configure goals and ecommerce. Need help configuring goals and/or ecommerce on Google Analytics? Get in touch with our experts!

2016-08-09

Attributing goals and conversions to marketing channels

On most websites, the conversion journey involves many different routes and across many sessions: few customers buy from the first advert. You may have heard of the ‘rule of 7’. In reality, it varies from maybe 2 or 3 touches for a $20 purchase and definitely more than 10 for an enterprise business service. Your company is buying prospects (or traffic) from a number of online channels, and in many cases, it will be the same potential customer coming from different sources. To be able to report on this in Google Analytics, we need to get the basic setup correct. Tagging campaigns for attribution The first step is to make sure that the different traffic sources can be compared in a multi-channel report are consistent and have complete inbound link tagging. Be sure to tag your campaign correct with our URL Builder. Some tools (such as Bing or Mailchimp) have options to turn on link tagging for GA - although it's buried in the settings. With many others, you will have to add the necessary ‘UTM’ parameters onto the link. Without this tagging, many sources will be misattributed. For example, affiliate networks could send referrals from any of thousands of websites which will appear under the ‘referrals’ channel by default. Facebook ads, since the majority come from the Facebook’s app, will appear under the ‘direct’ (or ‘unknown’) channel. From when full tagging is in effect, the channels report will start to reflect your genuine traffic acquisition source. But don’t expect a 100% match with other tracking tools – see our article on Facebook – GA discrepancies. Importing cost data The cost for any Google AdWords campaigns can be imported automatically, by linking the accounts, but for any third party campaigns, you will need to upload a spreadsheet with your costs on. The benefit is that now you can see the return on investment calculation update in real-time in the multi-channel reports. Model attribution The final step is to decide how you will attribute the value of a campaign if it forms part of a longer conversion pathway. The default for Google Analytics (and most others) is ‘last non-direct click’. That means that the most recent TAGGED campaign gets all the credit for the sale. If the user clicks on 5 Facebook ads, and then eventually buys after an abandoned basket email reminder, that email reminder will get all the sales (not Facebook). This attribution is what you’ll see in all the standard campaign and acquisition reports. You may feel that it is unfair on all the work done by the earlier campaigns, so ‘linear’ (sale equally credited to all tagged campaigns) or ‘time decay’ (more recent campaigns get more credit) may be a better fit with your businesses’ goals. Conclusion Multi-channel marketing performance attribution is not a luxury for the largest companies. It’s available to you now, with the free version of Google Analytics. It will require some setup effort to get meaningful reports (as with any measurement tool) but it has the power to transform how you allocate budget across a range of online marketing platforms. But if this still is not working for you then you may have a problem with cross domain tracking. Need a bit more advice or have any questions? Get in touch with our experts or leave a comment below!

2016-08-04

Tips to optimise your ecommerce landing pages

Are your ecommerce landing pages suffering from poor conversion rate because people aren't engaging? First impressions are everything, and more so online, so your task is to figure out which on-site improvements will help you towards your goals. Once you start optimising, it's a continuous process of reviewing, changing, testing and refining - aiming to find out what is most appealing to your customers, what they like and care about, what makes them trust you, what encourages them to purchase. There is always room for refinements so here are some tips on what you should consider when reviewing your pages. What are you trying to achieve? Before starting testing and implementing the changes on your landing pages, you have to be clear about what you want to accomplish. Whilst the end goal for an online store is to increase sales, at times you might also want to get more sign ups, or improve views of or engagement with product pages. Think about what success will look like as that will help with planning your optimisation tests. How are you going to measure it? If you are clear about what you are trying to achieve, it will be easier to set measurable targets. Are you looking to increase your sales by 10% or pageviews of products by 15%? Or maybe you want your potential customers to browse further and spend more time reading content? Further engagement can also be demonstrated by the site visitor scrolling down the page if you have long product or category pages. In which case you'll want to track how far down the page they get to. I believe in keeping reporting straightforward so when testing focus on tracking important metrics only. Ideally just one if you can, or a few if you have to, but that will help focus on measuring what is most important for your business at the time. Assuming you are using Google Analytics, like most of people looking after digital performance, set up goals to monitor how customers are converting. Our web-based software also makes it easy to keep track of on-site changes are by reporting on changes in trends, goals, pages. Who are you targeting? User-focussed content is more effective at engaging your customers and improving your conversion rates. So you should write up your customer personas to be clear about who you are targeting with landing pages. This also applies to general look and feel of your ecommerce site. Most importantly, include with personas what problems your customers are trying to solve or what they are trying to achieve.  Once your team knows who your ideal or typical customers are, then it will be easier to focus on creating more relevant and engaging content on those pages. Do you have a clear value proposition? Value proposition explains why you’re better than or different from your competitors, and what you can deliver that they can’t. When writing it up, focus on benefits not features. It’s not always about the product looking top notch (unless you’re the industry or company where that matters of course) so it is more about how you can alleviate their problem. Check out how to write your value proposition by following Geoffrey Moore’s model. Does your copy reflect your value proposition? Once you have your customer personas and value proposition, review existing content on the site against how you describe what your clients are looking for. Check if it fits with what they are looking for, explains how you can solve their problems or fulfill their desires. The copy on your site has to reflect how you can improve your potential customers lives through what you offer. A great copy informs, compels, captivates, reflects what people search for and promotes key benefits. Econsultancy have compiled a great set of advice from experts on writing copy for product pages. Also, check out Copyblogger Demian Farnworth’s articles for superb advice on writing copy. Have you found your winning call to action? This is very important – test your call to action until you find the best performing one. Your call to action is like a visual sign that guides the buyer towards a specific action you want them to complete. Different things work for different sites. Start off with trying simple changes like different text, colour, shape, size or placement of the button to figure out what is most effective for your page. If small changes aren’t helping, then try a more drastic change of the button or page. Do your pages load fast? This is pretty self-explanatory. Slow page loading speed might drive your potential customers away from your online shop, so you should regularly check whether they can view your products within 3 seconds (Source: Radware). If you’re using Google Analytics, you can use Site Speed reports to check how you’re performing and get advice on where to improve. If you don’t have Google Analytics, you can use their online tool PageSpeed Insights. Other tool worth checking out is GTMetrix where you can grade your site's speed performance and get a list of recommendations. Do you need to optimise for mobile? It’s a very common fact that more and more people are using mobile devices to browse and buy online. But unless you have unlimited budget for ensuring that your ecommerce site is optimised for mobile, it is best to check in Google Analytics first whether you need to do it now. If you go to Google Analytics > Audience > Mobile > Overview report, you will get a breakdown of device categories that buyers are using to visit your online store. Here you can see that the majority of customers, almost 93% are using desktop so in this case (assuming you have a limited budget) you might want to make sure you have a responsive site at the very minimum, and leave a full optimisation for mobile device for later when there is a sufficient need. Now, if results were different and let’s say you had 60% of people visiting your site via mobile devices, then you would want to ensure that they’re getting the best experience on their device and don’t leave the site to buy from a competitor instead. Are your test results statistically significant? Evaluating your AB test results isn't quite as simple as looking at the highest conversion rate for each test, which would be an incorrect way to interpret the outcome. You want to be confident that results are conclusive and changes you tested will indeed improve your conversion rates (or not, depending on the outcome of testing). That's where statistical significance comes in. It gives you assurance about the results of your tests whilst taking into consideration your sample size and how confident you want to be about the importance of the results. By reaching over 95% statistical confidence in testing results, you can be sure that the winning variation performed better due to actually being an improved version, and not simply due to change. You can easily find a calculator online that tells you if your AB testing results were statistically significant and you should conclude the test or not - for example, try the calculator by Kissmetrics or Peakconversion. There is no one winning formula for how to make your pages more effective, but you have to be pro-active to figure out what they are  - so keep testing until you do. Have any questions? Leave a comment below or get in touch with our experts!   Image Credit: Stocksnap.io

2016-07-27

Try the top-rated Google Analytics app for Shopify stores

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