Do App + Web Google Analytics properties work with Shopify?

The short answer is no: until these new properties come out of Beta testing and support Enhanced Ecommerce reporting, we can’t recommend you use them with your Shopify store. This past July, Google brought out a public beta forcombining website and native mobile app tracking called ‘App + Web’ properties. These are technically a big step forward for Google Analytics (GA), combining some of the flexible, event-based tracking from Firebase Analytics for mobile with the deeper reporting and journey analysis tools in GA. However, we believe these are not yet suitable for use with ecommerce stores because they miss the Enhanced Ecommerce reporting that makes GA so powerful for Shopify analysis. Where’s this new reporting going? What Google appears to be doing is rebuilding Google Analytics from the ground up, so it’s fair to call it ‘GA v2’. Some of the long-term problems they are addressing include: Flexible ways of building funnels based on a series of events and page views (i.e. no more limitation on ONLY page views or event funnels) More powerful ways to build ‘audiences’ used in other Google tools (such as Google Ads), instead of the clunky and error-prone advanced segment builder True event-level views of the data with ‘stream view’ Enabling events to be sent with many properties, rather than just event ‘action’ and ‘label’ See Krista Seiden’s excellent post for more information on the features. What’s next with App + Web? We hope that (eventually) ecommerce events are added to that list, but it might be in a more flexible way to how GA v1 copes with events. We’ll keep watching the progress, as this ‘App + Web’ setup is going to be the future it seems.

2019-12-17

Shopify analytics vs Google Analytics: which offers better ecommerce data?

If your Shopify store is starting to pick up traction, you've probably wondered if you're better off using Shopify's native analytics platform or Google Analytics, the household name for cross-industry reporting. Truth is, both Shopify analytics and Google Analytics offer unique benefits and features of their own. The difference, however, is that one of them is inherently incomplete, leaving Shopify merchants without valuable insights to make well-informed decisions for their store. So, which of them is incomplete? Let's dive in. Shopify tracking Shopify's analytics dashboard (available to both basic Shopify stores and Shopify Plus stores) provides a birds-eye view of the "big ticket" metrics, including average order value (AOV), conversion rate, sessions by location, sessions by traffic source, etc. With Shopify analytics, merchants can do the following: check and compare the value of recent sales by time period compare sales channels by performance track average order value identify store visitors by source (social media channel, location, etc.) monitor shopper trends over time Break in the system However, Shopify analytics offers an incomplete and inaccurate view for merchants, including key metrics like average order value and customer lifetime value (LTV). How do we know this? Take an example from earlier this year, when our team analyzeddata from 10 Shopify Plus customers to see whether the sales by traffic source report within Shopify analytics could be trusted. [subscribe] Turns out, the sales by traffic source report was broken. Looking at 180,000 orders for 10 stores in Q4 2018, here are the marketing channels which Shopify Analytics says brought the traffic: Direct 83.5% Social 9% Search 4.5% Unknown (other websites, not social or search) 3% Email ~0.1% Clearly, the Direct channel traffic seems high — what channels was Shopify grouping under Direct? As you can see below, Shopify's data is all wrong. Here’s a comparison of Shopify’s attribution to Google Analytics last-click attribution of sales for one of these customers: Unfortunately for merchants primarily using Shopify analytics, the proof is in the pudding. Shopify users have frequently shown doubts as well — when we googled the keyword shopify analytics, the first Google-generated FAQ was is Shopify Analytics accurate? So is Google Analytics any more reliable for Shopify merchants? Google Analytics tracking With Google Analytics, merchants can do the following: Track number of sessions/purchases AND unique sessions/purchases Calculate accurate customer lifetime value (LTV) Dive deeper with acquisition reports — analyze campaign performance, referrals, etc. Segment by user type to evaluate your visitors (and potential ROI of retargeting them) Run conversion rate optimization (CRO) tests Analyze checkout funnel drop-offs Track which landing pages generate the most revenue Monitor your target keywords and optimize your store messaging accordingly Use custom segments to see the difference in revenue between search terms The list goes on. But beyond tracking site visitors, sessions, and other customer behavior on your store, Google Analytics provides a more complete picture of store performance within a more robust dashboard. Out with the old Without Enhanced Ecommerce reporting, GA still offers a somewhat limited view of shopper behavior. The EE plugin provides useful data about customer behavior before a purchase is made, giving you a better picture of the buying journey for your customers. Every stage is tracked — from research to consideration to purchase and even refunds. Enhanced Ecommerce does a little bit of everything: Customer behavior before, during, and after a purchase Detailed reports on: Average order value Add to carts Average order size Affiliate data records (number of transactions, affiliate revenue, etc.) Cart abandonment Track customer turnover — at what stage of the funnel are they walking away? Shopper engagement, including product views and purchases Coupon and discount reporting Even with EE, Google Analytics isn't a perfect platform. There is a problem with the reliability of transaction volumes within GA (luckily, this can be fixed with Littledata's Shopify app). But using Shopify’s reports alone to guide your marketing is ignoring the power that has led Google Analytics to be used by over 80% of large retailers. [note] See 4 reasons why you need Google Analytics for your Shopify store.[/note] GA's Enhanced Ecommerce plugin also offers a big step up from Shopify's basic reporting: Google Analytics Enhanced Ecommerce If you're a Shopify merchant using Google Analytics (either as your main reporting tool or in conjunction with Shopify analytics), make sure you enable Enhanced Ecommerce (EE) reporting on your GA dashboard, if you haven't already done so. [note] Learn more about EE reports and how to set them up here.[/note] EE offers Shopify merchants a gold mine of additional data. But while GA users have EE reporting functionalities by default, the biggest difference is that Shopify's tracker (in this case) does not accurately populate all the reports available with EE enabled. Bridging the data gap Littledata's solution comes packaged in a top-rated Shopify app, where you can get a complete picture of your Shopify store performance, all within the familiar Google Analytics dashboard. With the app, you won't have to worry about switching back and forth between reporting tools or crossing your fingers in hopes that the data you're seeing is accurate. The app offers 100% accurate data from every event (including page views, add to carts, purchases and refunds) that takes place in your Shopify store at every step of the customer journey. It also guarantees pinpointed marketing attribution, so you can track where your customers are coming from and exactly how they arrived at your store. Consider your tracking accurate and automated from here on out! [subscribe] A better question to ask While Shopify’s dashboards give you a simple, daily overview of sales and product data, if you're spending at least a few hundred dollars per month on online advertising or investing in SEO, you need a more robust way to measure success. So, Shopify analytics vs Google Analytics might be the common search query, but here's a better one: how do I ensure my Shopify tracking is accurate? For that, it's Littledata to the rescue. Shopify Plus users should stay tuned for Part 2: Do I need a Shopify Plus expert to help with Google Analytics?

by Nico
2019-11-05

How to choose the best Google Analytics consultant for your Shopify store

It's no secret that Google Analytics (GA) is the bedrock of modern analytics. For analytics experts in all verticals — not only ecommerce — Google Analytics is the primary tool for setting goals, tracking results, ecommerce benchmarking and optimising campaigns for peak performance. [note]Do you really need a Google Analytics expert to help with your Shopify data?[/note] But GA is no walk in the park. It's a complex platform with a robust dashboard, unique features like Enhanced Ecommerce and dozens of helpful tracking features for merchants big and small. Because GA can be a learning curve for less experienced users, many Shopify merchants opt to work with a Google Analytics consultant or Google Analytics consulting group to navigate the waters of GA and optimise their product campaigns. [subscribe heading="Get top Google Analytics consultants for Shopify" background_color="green" button_text="get started" button_link="https://www.littledata.io/app/enterprise"] But before you go hunting for Google Analytics consultants for your store, make sure they check all the boxes: Can they code in GA? From UTM parameters to more complex bug fixes, a respectable GA consultant should be comfortable with code. While troubleshooting and custom implementations are the most common calls for coding experience, Google Analytics experts should be able to code in GA with no problems. Are they comfortable segmenting data? As the old adage goes, averages always lie. In other words, insights from data reports go beyond the average numbers that GA shows. To better understand the data, an experienced GA consultant should know how to segment the data. If you hire a GA consultant who shows you plain GA exports exactly as Google shows it to the user, he/she is providing your store no value. Data without a plan of action is just a collection of reported numbers — nothing more. Do they deliver insights, not reports? Not every Shopify store owner understands bounce rates, but most understand that there are shoppers who find their way to an online store, don't take any on-site action, and leave the site right away. In other words, a good Google Analytics consultant should not be interested in exports from GA, but insights. A reliable Google Analytics expert should be able to extrapolate data from GA, explain to store owners what it means and communicate the impact for ecommerce managers. We've seen that many merchants are not interested in complex GA data, and you probably don't have time to read comprehensive reports — what you probably need is guidance, translation and plain english to turn data into actionable insights. Why Shopify store owners choose enterprise plans There's no getting around it — highly effective (and affordable) Google Analytics consultants are difficult to come by. Luckily, there's a better way for merchants to track data they can trust and build their strategy around reliable reporting from GA. Littledata's enterprise plans (which are also optimised for Shopify Plus) offer all the benefits of a personal Google Analytics consultant along with better insights, the experience to address complex issues, and dashboards to visualise the KPIs that matter to your store. [subscribe heading="Try Littledata free for 30 days" background_color="grey" button_text="start my free trial"] 1) Start with an audit, sail to higher revenue We first got started as a next-gen audit tool, so it's no accident that enterprise plans begin with an audit review.   During the audit, we review your store's data gaps and tracking issues keeping you from data you can trust for actionable insights. Our audits extend across marketing channels, mobile app performance and user behaviour on your storefront and product pages.   Our Google Analytics-certified account managers ensure a smooth process through strategy, implementation and optimisation. 2) Define project goals If your store requires more than just ongoing audit fixes, we work with your team to define custom goals for the products you really want to push.   This can be something as standard as setting up Enhanced Ecommerce in Google Analytics or as complex as developing a multi-site dashboard to analyse average customer revenue by location. Either way, enterprise plans offer complete online support for peace of mind.   3) Decision-making power throughout the process Unlike some account managers, our team is hands-on from initial GA set up to implementation.  You'll be looped in throughout the entire process with an in-app, custom dashboard that updates real-time.   If you have GA questions, enterprise customers can also communicate with our account team through Slack and Trello.   4) Always getting better Our GA team monitors your data collection for accuracy and depth before creating custom recommendations.   These include step-by-step reports showing how to use your new analytics setup, how to maximise automated reporting and how to improve your marketing ROI and drive more revenue through fixed attribution. Take the first step Beyond deep experience with Shopify and Shopify Plus, we have a number of seamless connections with everyday tools like Facebook Ads and Google Ads for accurate marketing attribution, plus full support for Google Tag Manager setup, etc. Take the first step into our custom enterprise plans. 🚀

2019-07-18

Link Analytics to AdWords with our new Google Ads connection

To target -- and retarget -- the right shoppers, ecommerce sites need to connect customer behaviour and ecommerce data from Google Analytics with their Google Ads (AdWords) accounts. But until now that was a complicated process, to say the least. Marketers have spent years going through detailed setup steps to connect the platforms, or wading through spreadsheets with manual imports and exports, building custom audiences and segments. It was an ongoing headache, but they did it because connecting shopping behaviour data with AdWords campaigns gets big results. Now there's a better way. Littledata's new Google Ads connection makes it easy to link Analytics to AdWords. Ecommerce sites are using the connection for smarter targeting that increases online sales and customer LTV. Why should you link Analytics to AdWords? In past posts we've highlighted the benefits of linking Analytics with AdWords for a mutually beneficial relationship. Littledata's new connection automates the process to ensure accurate tracking and more targeted campaigns. Benefits include: Online sales data in AdWords reports, and visa versa. Add sales columns to reports in Google Ads and view Google Ads costs in Google Analytics. Abandoned cart campaigns. Get higher ROI with targeted PPC campaigns based on shopping cart activity. Ecommerce hyper-segmentation, especially for Shopify stores and enterprise clients. Since Littledata fixes ecommerce tracking across the checkout flow, the Google Ads connection is especially powerful for marketers looking to retarget with granular user behaviour data, such as product list views, product detail pages and adds-to-cart. Multiple accounts. Multiple views. Our Google Ads connections lets you link multiple AdWords accounts to multiple Google Analytics views. It's that simple. Wait, do you mean Ads or AdWords? Have you heard the news? Google AdWords is now Google Ads. Google pitched the switch to Ads as a large-scale rebrand for simplicity, but it's clearly targeted in part at bumping up competition against other 'ads' in common parlance: Facebook Ads, Instagram Ads and Twitter Ads, with Reddit Ads quickly gaining pace among SaaS companies in particular. We still talk about AdWords a bit on the blog (as does the rest of the internet, such as Search Engine Land), but soon we'll all have to adapt to the change. So we're calling this new connection a Google Ads connection, but we don't expect marketers to stop chatting about AdWords any time soon. How does it work? After you sign up for Littledata, you can connect Analytics to AdWords from the Connections tab in the Littledata app. Just follow a couple of setup steps and the app makes the connection for you. No more manual connections. Plus, we audit your analytics setup continually to ensure consistent ecommerce tracking, campaign tagging and UTM parameters. So what are you waiting for? Those products aren't going to retarget themselves... And don't forget to try our Facebook Ads connection to complete your marketing analytics stack. It's an easy way to link Facebook Ads to Google Analytics. All paid plans in the Littledata app include a variety of Google Analytics connections for Shopify, Shopify Plus, ReCharge, Refersion, CartHook and more. PS. The next iteration of our Google Ads connection will provide automation for retargeting using ecommerce segments. Sign up for Littledata today so you're first in line!

by Ari
2019-02-28

3 reasons you should be using Google Tag Manager for Shopify

Anyone running a Shopify store knows there are hundreds of Shopify apps, integrations and connections in the ecommerce world that can help you grow faster. But from Google Ads, DoubleClick, and Facebook Ads to custom plugins, many tools require you to insert scripts on the pages that need tagging, and for a lot of store owners, this can be a huge hassle without asking for developer help. Google Tag Manager (GTM) can launch new tags with just a few clicks. As the world's most popular enterprise-grade tag management solution, Google Tag Manager supports both Google and third-party tags. We've written quite a few articles on Google Tag Manager (including a full FAQ) and how to use it, but until now, we haven't dug deep into why you should use GTM. Here are 3 reasons why: 1. Reliable and accurate ecommerce data When your tags aren’t working properly, they can hurt your site performance, resulting in slow load times, website unavailability, or a loss of functionality. That’s why it’s critical to have a tag management solution in place that allows you to quickly determine the status of your tags. Easy-to-use error checking and speedy tag loading in Google Tag Manager means you know for certain that every tag works. You can rest assured knowing your mission-critical data is being collected reliably and accurately! Your IT team will also feel confident that the site is running smoothly, so everyone's happy, even during busy holidays or the launch of a new campaign. Large brands have implemented GTM to launch their tags exactly for this reason: reliable and accurate ecommerce data. PizzaHut, Made.com, AgeUK and many other brands running on Shopify use GTM to manage their tags for Google and third-party platforms. Setting up Enhanced Ecommerce via GTM In Google Analytics, the main benefit of using Enhanced Ecommerce tracking (EEC) over standard ecommerce implementation is the amount of valuable reports you have access to as a merchant with EEC. But that's not all—you can also segment data based on ecommerce events, such as: Which users visited your product pages Where your shoppers hit a roadblock in the customer journey (e.g. a shopper viewed a product but never added to cart) Which step of the checkout process a shopper abandoned cart This kind of data helps you zoom in on your sales funnel and update the parts of the process that either stall conversions or slow down the path to purchase. Enchanced Ecommerce implementation is no walk in the park, but it does depend on a few things: How large is your store? How many Google Analytics custom dimensions do you need to add? What type of custom dimensions? etc. Without question, Google Tag Manager is the easiest way to enable Enhanced Ecommerce in Google Analytics — and we can help with that! Do you already use GTM? If you already use GTM to track page views, you must send ecommerce data via Google Tag Manager. If you don't already use GTM...It’s a simple setup: activate EEC within your Google Analytics tags and use a dataLayer as an ecommerce data source. Just make sure the dataLayer contains all ecommerce data! 2. Quickly deploy Google and third-party tags With so many tracking tools out there, marketers need flexibility—whether that’s changing tags on the fly or having the ability to easily add tags from other sources. In GTM, marketers can add or change their own tags as needed. Google Tag Manager supports all tags and has easy-to-use templates for a wide range of Google and third-party tags for web and mobile apps. Don’t see a tag listed? You can add it immediately as a custom tag. With this much flexibility, your campaign can be underway with just a few clicks. Even if you are using Google Ads (Adwords), Adroll, Facebook, Hotjar, Criteo or your own script, you can implement it with Google Tag Manager. Even if you're a publisher as, let's say, nationalgeographic-magazine.com, sell furniture at Made.com, sell event tickets as eventbrite.com or organise courses as redcrossfirstaidtraining.co.uk, GTM is the best way to organise all the scripts your partners provides. 3. Collaborate across the enterprise and make tag updates efficiently Collaboration across a large team can be a challenge. Not having the proper tools can stall workflows, which decreases productivity and efficiency. Workspaces and granular access controls allow your team to work together efficiently within Google Tag Manager: Multiple users can complete tagging updates at the same time and publish changes as they’re ready Multi-environment testing lets you publish to different environments to ensure things are working as expected I don't know about you, but every time I need to add a new script on my website, I hesitate out of fear my website will break and I wouldn't know how to fix it. I wanted a solution where I could add a script on my own, test it and then publish it without any developer help. And then I found Google Tag Manager. GTM lets you collaborate and work independently, at the same time, on the same website. You can publish a tag at the same time your teammate is creating an A/B testing experiment, all in the same GTM container. Adding Google Tag Manager to Shopify will help increase the value of your store and the accuracy of your Shopify tracking. GTM is free, it's reliable, and you can find plenty of how-tos on online so you can start using it right away. Google Tag Manager currently provides out-of-the-box integrations with: Google Analytics AdWords Conversion Tracking AdWords Remarketing (aka Google Ads, which we integrate with for accurate marketing attribution) DoubleClick Google Optimize (which we have a connection for!) Google Surveys Website Satisfaction - Google Surveys AdRoll Crazy Egg Hotjar LinkedIn Yieldify and more This out-of-the-box integration doesn't require any special knowledge. And, for any other script that you might have, we can walk you through the process of integrating Google Tag Manager and Shopify. Questions about GTM? Get in touch with our team of Shopify experts and Google Analytics consultants!   Quick links Building funnels and triggering other marketing tags in GTM How to set up Enhanced Ecommerce tracking via GTM Google Tag Manager FAQ Connecting your Google Analytics store for accurate Shopify tracking

2016-12-13
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