Shopify Marketing Events vs Google Analytics

At the Shopify Unite conference today I heard plenty of great ideas such as ShopifyPay but the most interesting for me as a data specialist was the marketing events API. Since we launched our Fix Google Analytics Shopify app earlier this year we’ve known that reporting was a weak spot in Shopify’s platform offering, and they admit that ‘understanding marketing campaign performance’ is one of the biggest challenges of Shopify merchants right now. The ability for other Shopify apps to plug their campaign cost and attribution data into Shopify (via the marketing events API) is a logical step to building Shopify’s own analytics capability, but I don’t believe it will be a substitute for Google Analytics (GA) anytime soon. Here’s why: 1. Google Analytics is the industry standard Every online marketer has used Google Analytics, and many have favourite reports they’ve learned to interpret. Moving them to use a whole new analysis platform will take time– and it’s taken GA 10 years to achieve that dominance. 2. GA provides platform-agnostic data collection For a store using Shopify as their only source of insights, moving away from Shopify would mean losing all the historic marketing performance data – so it would be very hard to make like-for-like comparisons between the old platform and the new. Many of our customers have used GA during and after a platform shift to get continuous historical data. Which ties into my first point that over 85% of businesses have a history of data in GA. 3. Incomplete marketing tagging will still cause issues Making valid analysis on multi-channel marketing performance relies on having ALL the campaigns captured - which is why our GA audit tool checks for completeness of campaign tagging. Shopify’s tracking relies on the same ‘utm_campaign’ parameters as GA, and campaigns that are not properly tagged at the time cannot be altered retrospectively. 4. Google is rapidly developing Google Analytics I’d like to see the Shopify marketing event collection evolve from its launch yesterday, but Google already has a team of hundreds working on Google Analytics, and it seems unlikely that Shopify will be able to dedicate resources to keep up with the functionality that power users need. 5. More integrations are needed for full campaign coverage Shopify’s marketing analysis will only be available for apps that upgrade to using the new API.  Marketing Events has launched with integrations for Mailchimp and Facebook (via Kit) but it won’t cover many of the major channels (other emails, AdWords, DoubleClick for Publishers) that stores use. Those integrations will get built in time, but until then any attribution will be skewed. 6. GA has many third-party integrations Our experience is that any store interested in their campaign attribution quickly wants more custom analysis or cuts of the data. Being able to export the data into Littledata’s custom reports (or Google Sheets or Excel) is a popular feature – and right now Shopify lacks a reporting API to provide the same customisations. You can only pull raw event data back out. That said, there are flaws with how GA attribution works. Importing campaign cost data is difficult and time consuming in GA – apart from the seamless integration with AdWords – and as a result hardly any of the stores we monitor do so. If Shopify can encourage those costs to be imported along with the campaign dates, then the return on investment calculations will be much easier for merchants. I also think Shopify has taken the right pragmatic approach to attribution windows. It counts a campaign as ‘assisting’ the sale if it happens within 30 days of the campaign, and also whether it was ‘last click’ or ‘first click’. I’ve never seen a good reason to get more complicated than that with multi-channel reports in GA, and it’s unlikely that many customers remember a campaign longer than 30 days ago. In conclusion, we love that Shopify is starting to take marketing attribution seriously, and we look forward to helping improve the marketing events feature from its launch yesterday, but we recommend anyone with a serious interest in their marketing performance sticks to Google Analytics in the meantime (and use our Shopify app to do so).

2017-04-21

Important update to Remarketing with Google Analytics

If you got this email from Google recently, or seen the blue notification bar at the top of Google Analytics, here's what is changing and how it affects your website. The big problem in modern online marketing is that most users have multiple devices, and the device they interact with the advert on is not the same as the one they convert on: [Google’s] research shows that six in ten internet users start shopping on one device but continue or finish on a different one. Facebook has been helping advertisers track conversion across devices for a few years  - because most Facebook ads are served on their mobile app, when most conversion happens on larger screens. So Google has been forced to play catch-up. Here’s the message from the Google Analytics header: Starting May 15, 2017, all properties using Remarketing with Google Analytics will be enhanced to take advantage of new cross-device functionality. This is an important update to your remarketing settings, which may relate to your privacy policy. The change was announced last September but has only just rolled out. So you can remarket to users on a different device to the one on which they visited your site when: You build a retargeting audience in Google Analytics You have opted in to remarketing tracking in Google Analytics Users are logged into Google on more than one device Users have allowed Google to link their web and app browsing history with their Google account Users have allowed Google account to personalise ads they see across the web This may seem like a hard-to-reach audience, but Google has two secret weapons: Gmail (used by over 1 billion people and 75% of those on mobile) and Chrome (now the default web browser for desktop, and growing in mobile). So there are many cases where Google knows which devices are linked to a user. What is not changing is how Google counts users in Google Analytics. Unless you are tracking registered users, a ‘user’ in Google Analytics will still refer to one device (tablet, mobile or laptop / desktop computer).   Could Google use their account information to make Google Analytics cross-device user tracking better? Yes, they could; but Google has always been careful to keep their own data about users (the actions users take on Google.com) separate from the data individual websites capture in Google Analytics (the actions users take on mywebsite.com). The former is owned by Google, and protected by a privacy agreement that exists between Google and the user, and the latter is owned by the website adding the tracking code but stored and processed by Google Analytics. Blurring those two would create a legal minefield for Google, which is why they stress the word ‘temporary’ in their explanation of cross-device audiences: In order to support this feature, Google Analytics will collect these users’ Google-authenticated identifiers, which are Google’s personal data, and temporarily join them to your Google Analytics data in order to populate your audiences.   How can I make use of the new cross-device retargeting? The first step is to create a remarketing audience from a segment of your website visitors that are already engaged. This could be users who have viewed a product, users who have viewed the pricing page or users who have viewed more than a certain number of pages. For more help on setting up the right goals to power the remarketing audience, please contact us.

2017-04-10

Cross Domain tracking for Eventbrite using Google Tag Manager (GTM)

Are you using Eventbrite for event registrations? And would you like to see the marketing campaign which drove that event registration correctly attributed in Google Analytics? Then you've come to right place! Here is a simple guide to adding a Google Tag Manager tag to ensure the correct data is sent to Eventbrite to enable cross-domain tracking with your own website. Many thanks to the Lunametrics blog for their detailed solution, which we have adapted here for GTM. Before this will work you need to have: links from your site to Eventbrite (including mysite.eventbrite.com or www.eventbrite.co.uk) the Universal Analytics tracking code on both your site and your Eventbrite pages. only have one GA tracking code on your own site - or else see the Lunametrics article to cope with this 1. Create a new tag in GTM Create a new custom HTML tag in GTM and paste this script: [code language="javascript"] <script> (function(document, window) { //Uses the first GA tracker registered, which is fine for 99.9% of users. //won't work for browsers older than IE8 if (!document.querySelector) return; var gaName = window.GoogleAnalyticsObject || "ga" ; // Safely instantiate our GA queue. window[gaName]=window[gaName]||function(){(window[gaName].q=window[gaName].q||[]).push(arguments)};window[gaName].l=+new Date; window[gaName](function() { // Defer to the back of the queue if no tracker is ready if (!ga.getAll().length) { window[gaName](bindUrls); } else bindUrls(); }); function bindUrls() { var urls = document.querySelectorAll("a"); var eventbrite = /eventbrite\./ var url, i; for (i = 0; i < urls.length; i++) { url = urls[i]; if (eventbrite.test(url.hostname) === true) { //only fetches clientID if this page has Eventbrite links var clientId = getClientId(); var parameter = "_eboga=" + clientId; // If we're in debug mode and can't find a client if (!clientId) { window.console && window.console.error("GTM Eventbrite Cross Domain: Unable to detect Client ID. Verify you are using Universal Analytics."); break; return; } url.search = url.search ? url.search + "&" + parameter : "?" + parameter; } } } function getClientId() { var trackers = window[gaName].getAll(); return trackers[0].get("clientId"); } })(document, window); </script> [/code]   2. Set the tag to fire 'DOM ready' Create a new trigger (if you don't have a suitable one) to fire the tag on every page at the DOM ready stage.  We need to make sure the Google Analytics tracker has loaded first. 3. Test the marketing attribution With the script working you should see pageviews of the Eventbrite pages as a continuation of the same session. You can test this by: Opening the 'real time' reporting tag in Google Analytics, on an unfiltered view Searching for your own site in Google Navigating to the page with the Eventbrite link and clicking on it Looking under the Traffic Sources report and checking you are still listed as organic search after viewing the Eventbrite page Need more help? Comment below or get in touch!   Get Social! Follow us on LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook and keep up-to-date with our Google Analytics insights.

2017-02-07

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