Tips to optimise your ecommerce landing pages

Are your ecommerce landing pages suffering from poor conversion rate because people aren't engaging? First impressions are everything, and more so online, so your task is to figure out which on-site improvements will help you towards your goals. Once you start optimising, it's a continuous process of reviewing, changing, testing and refining - aiming to find out what is most appealing to your customers, what they like and care about, what makes them trust you, what encourages them to purchase. There is always room for refinements so here are some tips on what you should consider when reviewing your pages. What are you trying to achieve? Before starting testing and implementing the changes on your landing pages, you have to be clear about what you want to accomplish. Whilst the end goal for an online store is to increase sales, at times you might also want to get more sign ups, or improve views of or engagement with product pages. Think about what success will look like as that will help with planning your optimisation tests. How are you going to measure it? If you are clear about what you are trying to achieve, it will be easier to set measurable targets. Are you looking to increase your sales by 10% or pageviews of products by 15%? Or maybe you want your potential customers to browse further and spend more time reading content? Further engagement can also be demonstrated by the site visitor scrolling down the page if you have long product or category pages. In which case you'll want to track how far down the page they get to. I believe in keeping reporting straightforward so when testing focus on tracking important metrics only. Ideally just one if you can, or a few if you have to, but that will help focus on measuring what is most important for your business at the time. Assuming you are using Google Analytics, like most of people looking after digital performance, set up goals to monitor how customers are converting. Our web-based software also makes it easy to keep track of on-site changes are by reporting on changes in trends, goals, pages. Who are you targeting? User-focussed content is more effective at engaging your customers and improving your conversion rates. So you should write up your customer personas to be clear about who you are targeting with landing pages. This also applies to general look and feel of your ecommerce site. Most importantly, include with personas what problems your customers are trying to solve or what they are trying to achieve.  Once your team knows who your ideal or typical customers are, then it will be easier to focus on creating more relevant and engaging content on those pages. Do you have a clear value proposition? Value proposition explains why you’re better than or different from your competitors, and what you can deliver that they can’t. When writing it up, focus on benefits not features. It’s not always about the product looking top notch (unless you’re the industry or company where that matters of course) so it is more about how you can alleviate their problem. Check out how to write your value proposition by following Geoffrey Moore’s model. Does your copy reflect your value proposition? Once you have your customer personas and value proposition, review existing content on the site against how you describe what your clients are looking for. Check if it fits with what they are looking for, explains how you can solve their problems or fulfill their desires. The copy on your site has to reflect how you can improve your potential customers lives through what you offer. A great copy informs, compels, captivates, reflects what people search for and promotes key benefits. Econsultancy have compiled a great set of advice from experts on writing copy for product pages. Also, check out Copyblogger Demian Farnworth’s articles for superb advice on writing copy. Have you found your winning call to action? This is very important – test your call to action until you find the best performing one. Your call to action is like a visual sign that guides the buyer towards a specific action you want them to complete. Different things work for different sites. Start off with trying simple changes like different text, colour, shape, size or placement of the button to figure out what is most effective for your page. If small changes aren’t helping, then try a more drastic change of the button or page. Do your pages load fast? This is pretty self-explanatory. Slow page loading speed might drive your potential customers away from your online shop, so you should regularly check whether they can view your products within 3 seconds (Source: Radware). If you’re using Google Analytics, you can use Site Speed reports to check how you’re performing and get advice on where to improve. If you don’t have Google Analytics, you can use their online tool PageSpeed Insights. Other tool worth checking out is GTMetrix where you can grade your site's speed performance and get a list of recommendations. Do you need to optimise for mobile? It’s a very common fact that more and more people are using mobile devices to browse and buy online. But unless you have unlimited budget for ensuring that your ecommerce site is optimised for mobile, it is best to check in Google Analytics first whether you need to do it now. If you go to Google Analytics > Audience > Mobile > Overview report, you will get a breakdown of device categories that buyers are using to visit your online store. Here you can see that the majority of customers, almost 93% are using desktop so in this case (assuming you have a limited budget) you might want to make sure you have a responsive site at the very minimum, and leave a full optimisation for mobile device for later when there is a sufficient need. Now, if results were different and let’s say you had 60% of people visiting your site via mobile devices, then you would want to ensure that they’re getting the best experience on their device and don’t leave the site to buy from a competitor instead. Are your test results statistically significant? Evaluating your AB test results isn't quite as simple as looking at the highest conversion rate for each test, which would be an incorrect way to interpret the outcome. You want to be confident that results are conclusive and changes you tested will indeed improve your conversion rates (or not, depending on the outcome of testing). That's where statistical significance comes in. It gives you assurance about the results of your tests whilst taking into consideration your sample size and how confident you want to be about the importance of the results. By reaching over 95% statistical confidence in testing results, you can be sure that the winning variation performed better due to actually being an improved version, and not simply due to change. You can easily find a calculator online that tells you if your AB testing results were statistically significant and you should conclude the test or not - for example, try the calculator by Kissmetrics or Peakconversion. There is no one winning formula for how to make your pages more effective, but you have to be pro-active to figure out what they are  - so keep testing until you do. Have any questions? Leave a comment below or get in touch with our experts!   Image Credit: Stocksnap.io

2016-07-27

9 tips for marketers using Google Analytics

Setting up Google Analytics to collect data on your website visitors’ behaviour is step one. But are you getting the insights you need? Web analytics tools like Google Analytics can provide a wealth of information about what people do on your site, but it becomes powerful when you do more than just look at trends going up or down. It’s about measuring and improving. Here are some tips on how to use your data for informed marketing decisions for your company. Make analysis a regular habit Checking analytics to evaluate website and marketing performance varies from business to business. Some do it multiple times a day or only when it’s time to do their monthly reporting or end up getting hooked on real-time analytics. Make it a regular habit to analyse your Google Analytics metrics and before you know it, you won’t need the constant reminders to do so and it'll feel less like a chore. You can start off with doing it a few times a week and if you find that there aren’t enough changes to come to any conclusions, then do it less frequently. Whilst for smaller businesses the results won’t change much hour to hour or even day to day, for the bigger businesses changes can be significant on a daily basis. Form your questions Before sifting through your Google Analytics reports, come up with a set of questions that you are looking to answer with your data. You might want to know: What are users searching for? (requires site search to be set up) Which pages are they spending the most time on? Which pages have the highest bounce rate and might need further tweaking? How are my marketing campaigns performing? Is my spending on Adwords justified? Which traffic sources bring the best converting traffic and are worth investing into? Are my call to actions working? (this is where goals come in handy) Know where to measure Think about which reports and metrics will be most suitable to answer your questions. Knowing what you're looking for will minimise the amount you spend wandering aimlessly through numerous reports hoping that you'll find something interesting. It’s said that there are over 100 standard reports available in Google Analytics, so it’s handy to know where to look. The reports are split into 4 main categories: Audience is about the users – where are they, what devices are they using, Acquisition is about how users get to your site – how are your campaigns performing, where do they come from Behaviour is about user interaction with your site – which landing pages get the highest traffic, which pages have the highest bounce rate Conversions is about users completing certain actions (requires further setup to get the most out the reports) – which goals did they complete, what is their shopping and checkout behaviour Pages with high page views and bounces / exit rate Check how your individual pages are performing in All Pages and Landing Pages reports (under Behaviour > Site Content). If your page is getting a lot of page views and has a high bounce / exit rate, then whilst it might be a valuable or attractive piece of content it’s not doing a great job at getting your users to another page. Can you provide some other relevant content on that page? Link to them where appropriate. This will help improve the visitor journey through the site and reduce the bounce rate. Know your user journeys You can use Google Analytics flow reports to view which paths users take through your site and where they drop off. Evaluate the pages with the biggest drop offs  - can you improve these pages to encourage users continue their journey? You've put a lot of work into the pages that are meant to convert your site visitors, but it's a waste of all that effort if your journey to the converting page doesn't work. Goal flow report is especially handy for seeing users' paths towards the goals you have set up. Not sure how to set up a goal funnel? Here's how. Segment your users Use Google Analytics segments to view and analyse a separate subset of user data. You could view your reports for users from a specific location, eg Spain, or with a specific device, eg Apple iPad, or by certain behaviour, eg made a purchase. Check out Google's guidance on using segments. Evaluate your tagged campaigns Custom campaign tracking is important for organising your campaigns so you can review the performance effectively. If you're not tagging your campaigns yet, check out our blog post on how to tag your campaigns. Share findings with the team It’s great if you get into the habit of reviewing Google Analytics data on a regular basis to inform your actions. What's even better is if you create a team culture where you share findings with each other. You can email around individual reports, share insight at team meetings, set up custom alerts or sign up to our web-based tool to do that for you. For those less geeky or knowledgeable about data, make sure you translate the findings into plain English statements (PS. our tool already does that too). Continuos improvement When Dave Brailsford became the head of British Cycling, he implemented the concept of marginal gains within cycling. He believed that by breaking up the process of competing and improving every step by 1%, they would see a big improvement in their team. And he was right. All the small changes accumulated into a massive performance boost, and Team GB surpassed everyone’s expectations by going on to some big wins at Olympics and Tour de France.  This can apply to many other areas as well - customer satisfaction, improving service quality, doing minor updates to marketing campaigns. Rather than focussing on one big improvement and spending weeks or months on it, before even knowing if it'll work, look at the potential small changes you could make. You will spot much more quickly which of these changes are of benefit and which are not. There's a lot of information stored in your Google Analytics, when used correctly and regularly you will start getting the insight you need to guide your marketing efforts. Suggestions above will help you do just that. Something else on your mind? Let us know in the comments below or get in touch!   Images: Courtesy of Suriya Kankliang, pannawat at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

2016-03-17

How to use the lookup table variable in Google Tag Manager

A lookup table in Google Tag Manager makes it much simpler to manage lots of values in your tracking setup. It can drastically reduce the number of tags required and turn your messy GTM into a neat environment. It's especially useful with larger setups where you have multiple tracking requirements and flexible to accommodate new tracking needs as they arise. You can easily add or remove values from your lookup tables, and not worry about having to change any codes. The lookup table variable allows you to define a set of key-value pairs where the output variable (the value that you are sending to Google Analytics) is linked to the identifier (the key). It works like this: When [input variable] equals to  _______, set [this output variable] to_______. For example, you could use the lookup table for: Assigning different Google Analytics property IDs for various domains/hostnames, eg. when [website hostname] equals to littledata.co.uk, set [property ID] to UA-010101 (see example below) Setting different pixel or conversions IDs for different country websites, eg when [website country code] equals to 2, set [pixel ID] to 88779 (requires having website country code variable defined) Defining your event categories, actions and labels (see example below) Remember! There’s no limit to how many values you can have in the lookup table, but the fields are case sensitive. So if you have multiple capitalisations of some input, then include all of them in the lookup table and assign the same output for each. I have previously explained setting up the tracking of user actions as events in GTM, but when you need to track multiple events, one tag just doesn't cut it anymore. And instead of creating several tags to cover each event or action, here's how you would create the lookup table to cover multiple values in one place. Creating lookup table variable for event parameters In the Littledata software interface, you get an option to switch between different report types or view them all. I want to track when people click on different report types, so instead of creating 5 different tags for each user action, I will set up a lookup table to cover all of them in one place. But firstly I need to know which variable to use as the input. You can only have one type of input variable per the lookup table so you want to pick a variable type that applies to each (ideally). For this, I will check how each report type option has been set up in the code by inspecting the element (inspect/inspect element depending on the browser you're using and usually accessible via right click). Here's how each report type has been set up: <a href="/report-list/m2i4MnmXcewDSzZ3c/all" class="current" id="ga-all">All <span class="count">120</span></a> <a href="/report-list/m2i4MnmXcewDSzZ3c/trends" class="" id="ga-trends">Trends <span class="count">80</span></a> <a href="/report-list/m2i4MnmXcewDSzZ3c/pages" class="" id="ga-pages">Pages <span class="count">37</span></a> <a href="/report-list/m2i4MnmXcewDSzZ3c/tips" class="" id="ga-tips">Tips <span class="count">3</span></a> <a href="/report-list/m2i4MnmXcewDSzZ3c/benchmark" class="" id="ga-benchmark">Benchmark <span class="count">0</span></a> Looking at the above, I can see that each report type has a unique ID - here that's the best one to use. Now to set this up, go to Variables, click ‘New’ and select 'Lookup Table' as your variable type. For the input variable, I will use {{Click ID}} as explained above, but you, of course, use whatever unique identifier you have available. For your output, you want to define the event action you are going to send to the Events report in Google Analytics. Should you set the default value? You can set a default value for the output when there is no match found in your table. With the event tracking, I sometimes find it useful to enable to identify if I set up my tag correctly. If my trigger ends up being too broad, the default value option will pick up additional values not defined in the table. I will then see these values in Google Analytics reports and this way I can tidy up the trigger to be more accurate. So this is what your variable should look like now. Click ‘Create Variable’ and there you have it. In your GA event tag, the newly created variable would look like this. Other uses Multiple Google Analytics properties If you have a single GTM container installed on multiple domains but you're tracking them across different Google Analytics properties, you want to ensure that you're sending the data to the correct one. Instead of having multiple variables to store different property IDs, you can have them all neatly in the same table defined by the hostname. This way any tracking activity on each site will go to its own dedicated property. Excluding test or other data If you want to make sure that any data outside of your main site goes to a test or other Google Analytics property, you can do so by setting the default value. The default value is the output that is not found in the table. With this setup, any activity tracked on www.mainsite.com goes to property ID UA-121212. If the activity wasn't on www.mainsite.com, then it sent to property ID UA-121212-2. Use lookup tables for something else? Confused? Get in touch or comment below!

2016-03-09

How to set up event tracking in Google Tag Manager

Events in Google Analytics are important for understanding how people interact with your website. They give you additional insight into their behaviour and how effective your pages are for leading users towards a conversion. With event tracking you could see how many users clicked on a button or played a video, scrolled down a page or clicked on your contact and social media icons. I mostly use Google Tag Manager (GTM) for analytics setup so I will show how to set up event tracking for clicks on buttons with GTM. Instead of hard coding events in the code, GTM allows you to create, test and amend tags within its interface. Before you go ahead creating your event tags, make sure your built-in pages and clicks variables are enabled. This will avoid you having to go back and forth between different sections. The setup below covers only one action - a click on a specific button - but if you have multiple actions to track, then look into implementing a lookup table variable. Tracking button clicks Here's my scenario. I want to track our BENCHMARK YOUR SITE button that allows users to sign up to our free software plan and get benchmarked against competitors.   And here's how to set it up. 1. Create a tag It will be a Universal Analytics tag type where tracking ID is a constant string variable (you need to create this variable before using it) and track type 'Event'. Think of your event tracking parameters as a way to organise the events into a hierarchy: Category – the main aim of the button or its placement Action – what the user clicked or the action Label – provides additional information like on what page the button was clicked or the outbound link they clicked on Value – if you have a numerical value to set for your click (not in my case tho) In my example, the category is ‘Get started’ because we have a number of similar buttons across the site with the same purpose to get the user started with the signup, so all of them have the same event category. For action, I specify the type of button that was clicked on so I can compare how these different buttons perform - 'Benchmark your site' in this case. My event label is the {{Page Path}} where they clicked on the button. The buttons take the user to the same place so I’m more interested in which pages these buttons were clicked on. Alternatively, if you have buttons that take people to different URLs you might want to track that instead. Is it a non-interaction hit? This is an important one to keep in mind. By default this is set to False. If you don’t want this event to impact your bounce rate, then change it to True, which you would do if the click or action didn’t take the user to the new page, or if you didn't want it to be included in your bounce rate calculations. Now click 'Continue' to go to the trigger setup. 2. Create a trigger Trigger is like a rule that allows you to tell the tag, ie specify the conditions, when it should fire. Under 'Fire On' select ‘Click’ as your trigger type and then ‘New’. For configuring the trigger, you have a choice between two types: Just Links – use this when the target is a link or anchor tag <a> All Elements – use this when the target is any other element that’s not a link To determine what’s best for your purposes you need to have a look at how your button is set up. You can do this by selecting ‘inspect element’ or simply ‘inspect’ depending on what browser you’re using. It’s usually available when you right click on the button or element.   Our button has been set up the following way: <a href="https://littledata.uk/signup" class="btn btn-ltd btn-green">benchmark your site</a> It has a link so I will use 'Just Links' for targets and I have a choice between three elements to use in further configuration: https://littledata.uk/signup as click url btn btn-ltd btn-green as click class benchmark your site as click text It is best to use a unique condition if you can. This way, if similar class or click url gets reused in other parts of the website you don't have to go back to this trigger to update it. With 'Just Links' you will get additional configuration options: Wait for tags - delays opening of links until all other tags have fired or the wait time has lapsed, whichever happens first Check validation - fires the tag only when opening the link was a valid action, without the tag will fire whenever the user clicks on the button/link Enable when - this options is shown only when either of the above is ticked so you can be specific about where you want the trigger to be active If you want the trigger to listen to the interactions on all pages, then set that section to be  URL or Page Path matches regex .*. (without that very last full stop - that one's for the sentence) In my case, I only want it to work on benchmark pages and all of them start with /benchmark/. The very last step in trigger setup is specifying on which actions or clicks the tag should fire. As said above, I'm using the button's click class here. All done? This is what your tag should now look like. Click 'Create Tag'. 3. Test Test your tag in GTM's preview mode by checking two things: the tag fires in the preview interface, and the tag is seen in Google Analytics real time view under 'Events' with the event parameters you specified   I hope you got on with the setup above just fine, but if you have questions or clarifications, feel free to ask below.   Further reading: Know who converts on your site with Google Analytics goals Using lookup table variable in Google Tag Manager Intro to Google Tag Manager's key concepts and terminology Image: Courtesy of suphakit73 at FreeDigitalPhotos.net  

2016-03-02

How to trust your Google Analytics data setup

Google Analytics is a powerful tool… when implemented correctly. I can’t even count the number of times we've had enquiries from and spoken to companies who don’t trust the data in their reports because it's incorrect or incomplete. And it all comes down to wrong configuration and setup. Checking and amending correctly the very basics of your analytics setup will provide you with data you can rely on and an accurate foundation for further more advanced configurations, like Enhanced Ecommerce tracking. So here's a list of questions you should be asking whilst checking your Google Analytics (GA) property and view settings. This is assuming you're on Universal Analytics (analytics.js) so not all setup options may apply if your site is on Classic analytics (ga.js). I'll also cover a few common setup issues at the end. GA property settings Go to Admin > Property > Property Settings. Is your default URL set up correctly? The default URL is used in Content and in-Page Analytics reports to display page previews. Do you have a correct default view picked? By default, this will be the first view created at the time of initial GA setup. If you're using AdWords Express or Google Play, then you want to check the view here is the one you want to connect to either of the services. The default view will also show you all the custom and advanced segments you've created in other views. Have you set your industry category? Pick whatever matches your property most closely if you want to be included in the benchmark reports. Have you enabled demographics reports? Demographics and interests reports give you additional insight into your users. Recently I explained how to set this up in Google Analytics and Google Tag Manager V2. Do you need enhanced link attribution? Enable this if you have pages with multiple links that take people to the same destination or a page element that has multiple destinations, eg internal search. This will help with identifying which particular elements or links were clicked. In addition to enabling this in the property settings, you also need to add a line of code to your GA tracking code, or, if using GTM, toggle Enhanced Link Attribution to true in your pageview tag under Advanced Configuration settings. Should you link with your Search Console? Link your Search Console site with your Google Analytics property to see Search Console data in your GA reports, and access GA reports directly from the Links to your site and Sitelinks sections in Search Console. GA view settings Property settings sorted? Great, now go to View > View Settings. Is your view name descriptive? Use easy to understand naming to describe what the view is for, eg excluding admin, domains included, ecommerce data only. Have you set your default URL? Similarly to the property settings, make sure you use the correct default URL here to improve your Content and in-Page Analytics reports. Have you set a correct time zone? The beginning and end of each day for your reports is calculated based on the time zone you have set. If you need to update this, you may see a flat spike in your data caused by the time shift. Do you need a default page? Setting a default page is useful when you have two separate URLs loading the same homepage. Here you can configure those pages to be considered as the same URL. This will affect your reports so make sure you do this correctly Should you exclude URL query parameters? Specify any parameters you don’t want to see in your reports. I've found a blog post from Lunametrics useful for understanding when and how to exclude URL query parameters. Is your currency correct? Especially relevant for sites with ecommerce tracking for making sure that the reports show your order values and revenues in the currency you operate in, and not in $ that it converts to by default. Have you ticked bot filtering option? Whilst this option doesn't help with eliminating all of the spam referrals, ticking this box will exclude at least a few of them. To get rid of all of your fake referrals, here's a thorough guide on how to exclude them with two filters. Get yourself a cuppa if you're going to clean up your data. Does your website have a search function? Enabling the site search is useful for understanding what your website visitors are looking for. It should be pretty painless to set up if you have a query included in the URL, and we've covered the steps to set up internal site search tracking in one of our blogs. Other common setup issues Here are also a few very common setup problems that I keep coming across again and again. Have you got an unfiltered view? It's good practice to have an unfiltered view that you keep clean from any filters and customisation. This way you can always double-check your data if anything goes wrong in another view. Is your bounce rate less than 10% whilst your pageviews have doubled? This may be happening due to pageviews firing multiple times. You can use Tag Assistant plugin for Chrome to check if that's true. Are you getting referrals from your own domain and your payment gateway? This is skewing your data so checkpoints 3 and 4 on how to exclude referrals from your domain and payment provider. Tracking multiple subdomains in the same view? By default, you see only request URI in your reports without a domain, which isn't very helpful if you are tracking more than one domain in the same GA view. You can improve this by adding a hostname to URLs with a custom filter. Check Google's guidance for how to do it. Are you filtering out internal traffic? To minimise your data being skewed by internal colleagues or partner companies you may be working with, exclude their IPs with the help of filters. Are you on top of website traffic changes? OK, so this one isn't quite about the problem with the setup but if data has an important role in your business, you can make your analysis more efficient. Google provides you with the ability to set up alerts for important changes in your data, but our software does the work for you. Instead of trawling your data for hours or spending further time on configurations, you can set up alerts and personalised reports within minutes.   Have you experienced other setup problems that aren't covered above? Let me know and I'll include them. Image Credit: Images courtesy of vectorolie and ratch0013 at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

2016-02-18

Know who converts on your site with Google Analytics goals

Wouldn't you want to know how well people convert on your site? Setting up basic conversion goals will enable you to measure site engagement – based on time on site, destination page or particular events - and what drives that. Below I’ll cover the reasons why you should set up goal tracking in your Google Analytics, different types of goals available, goal value, and then explain how to set them up. So why should you track goals? Goals are great for tracking important actions that are crucial for your business and understanding how people convert on your site. Once you set up goals, you will be able to analyse conversion rates in the Goals reports. Conversion data will also appear in other Google Analytics reports, like the Attribution and Acquisition reports. This will help you identify which marketing campaigns and channels get users to complete the goals you have previously defined. The destination goal also allows you to set up a funnel to visualise the path people take through your site towards completing a purchase, signing up or another conversion. Seeing how people navigate through your site in a visual way makes it easier to identify where they drop off. If you see a lot of exits on particular pages, then review those pages to see if you can improve them to minimise the exits and guide more people towards converting. If you see a lot of people skipping certain pages, then your path to conversion might be too long or contain unnecessary steps. For more info on flow visualisation reports, check Google’s help pages. What kind of goals can you set up? You can set up a destination goal to track how many users reached a certain page, eg thank you, purchase confirmation or pre-order request pages. Then there’s a duration goal that tracks how many users stayed for a specific amount of time, eg for at least 15 minutes. You can also set up a pages/screens per session goal to see how many users view a specific number of pages during a session. An event goal is for when a user triggered certain events on the site that you have already set up, eg clicked on an ad, submitted a form or saved a product. What else should you know about goals? Goals have a few limitations in Google Analytics: You can set up only 20 goals per view. If you need more, you can either create another view or repurpose existing goals. Goals apply to the data after you’ve created them. Goals can’t be deleted; but you can turn them off if you don’t need them. Use names that make sense so that anyone using your Google Analytics data can understand what the goals are for. Keep track of when you changed the goal by adding annotations to your reports. Do you need the goal value? Setting up a goal value is optional. You should set a monetary value for your goal when you want to track how much you earned from converting users and you’re able to calculate the worth of each lead. If you know that 5% of people who sign up on your site end up buying your service, and the average value of your service is £1000, then you can set £50 as your goal value (5% of 1000). When setting up a goal value, make sure the currency corresponds to what you use on the site or are familiar with. You can do this in Admin > View > View Settings. Are you an ecommerce site? If you’re an online retailer, then instead of using goal values you should be using Ecommerce or Enhanced Ecommerce tracking for Google Analytics. These reports will be much more insightful for tracking your store performance. So how do you set up goals? You need to set these up at the view level. Go to Admin > View > Goals, and click New Goal. Google has added some goal templates that you can choose from if you’re happy to use their naming. Alternatively, select 'Custom' at the end of the list and click ‘Continue’ to the goal description. For your goal name use something that is easily understood by others using your Google Analytics account, and the goal details will depend on the type of goal you're setting up. Setting up destination goal You can follow the blog I've previously written on setting up the destination goal and funnel. Setting up duration goal Click ‘Continue’ and specify the minimum amount of time you want to track. Setting up pages/screens per session goal Here you specify the number of pages someone viewed per session. Setting up event goal Set the event you want to track as a goal by using exactly the same category, action, label and value as in the event. If you want to use a goal value here, you have the option to use the event value you’ve already set. Verify your goal - click ‘Verify’ to check if it works. If the goal has been set up correctly, you should see an estimation of the conversion rate your goal would get. If you’re not getting anything, check each step carefully and Google's help pages on why your conversion tracking might not be working. Once you’re happy with the setup, click ‘Create goal’ and check the results in your analytics reports after a few days or weeks, depending on the amount of traffic you get.   If you need help with the setup above or have another way of using goals, I’d love to hear about it in the comments below.

2016-01-28

A win for the UK digital sector: UK sites perform better than US sites in benchmark

UK-based websites are 5 percentage points better than their US peers at keeping mobile users engaged (with a lower bounce rate), and 2.5 percentage points better at keeping the users from desktop / laptop computers engaged. For bounce rate from email marketing, the difference was also 5 percentage points (a 14% better performance from UK websites). The comparison is based on the Google Analytics data from 209 UK companies and 95 US companies collated by Littledata. The British web industry has benefited from earlier smartphone adoption in the UK (81% vs 75% in the US; source: MarketingLand), and overall greater internet usage from UK consumers (source: Econsultancy). That should put UK-based developers in a great position to sell their experience to other countries with increasing internet adoption An example is MADE.com, a London-based furniture retailer which has used superior online customer acquisition to drive growth across the UK and continental Europe. Littledata founder, Edward Upton, explains: “It’s usually hard to get a hold of industry data to compare digital product performance against similar companies, but Littledata’s benchmarks provide a simple way for companies to find website features that are underperforming.” If your website beats those benchmarks that should not stop you improving. Whilst it’s great to know you’re doing well in a particular area, there are many comparative metrics you can check with our benchmarks to fully understand your performance overall. If your site is struggling with engaging users, then check out our suggestions on improving your bounce rate . Want to know how your site performs? Head over to Littledata Benchmark page and click 'Benchmark your site' to check your performance against others. How Littledata benchmarks work? We gather data from thousands of Google Analytics profiles, and anonymise them in a series of benchmarks, to give insight into how your marketing efforts are paying off. With this benchmark data, you can stop being in the dark about how your website performs and sign up to see how your site compares. Our customers also receive daily insight into site or app performance with our actionable trends reports. You can explore these and other benchmarks via Littledata Benchmark index page.   How would you use benchmarks in your daily work? Leave your comments below.

2016-01-14

Why should you tag your campaigns for Google Analytics?

Google Analytics custom campaign tracking is essential for measuring the effectiveness of your marketing efforts. Let's say you were promoting your new ebook across social media and emails, how would you know which social post or email blast was the most effective? That’s where Google campaign parameters come in (also referred to as UTM). You simply add them to your URLs, which are then used in your web-based, email or ad promotions. When someone clicks on them, the custom information linked to these URLs via parameters is sent to your Google Analytics reports. If you don’t tell Google the specifics of your campaigns, then they will be rolled into existing buckets without the ability to identify them. This most commonly happens with emails and social posts that by default get classified as referrals. But once you start tagging your campaigns, you will see those social initiatives and email newsletters separated by campaign names and other information you provided. Tagged up links can also be used in email signatures, listings on other sites and social media profiles. By using campaign tagging you will understand better which URLs have been most effective in attracting users to your site or content, for example you'll see which: Email newsletter brought you the most traffic Ad was best at bringing you converting visitors Facebook post engaged the most users If you have goals set up, then you will also see how visitors from individual campaigns convert on your website. Using custom campaign data in reports You can access custom campaign data in Acquisition > Campaigns > All Campaigns report, where you will see your various campaigns based on the parameters used in URLs. You can also switch between viewing your campaigns by source and medium tags that you’ve used. Another report you can use is the Assisted Conversions (under Conversion > Multi-Channel Funnels) that summarises how your channels, or campaigns, contribute to your conversions. To see the campaigns, you need to click on 'Other', find 'Campaign' and select it. Now you will see data related to your campaigns only. Check Google's guidance on understanding the Assisted Conversions report. Be consistent Consistency is very important in campaign tagging so make sure that the parameters you use in your campaigns are exact. For example, if you use email, Email and E-mail, Google Analytics will record them as three different mediums in your reports. So, set your naming conventions and if you have a bigger team, then agree on what they are and make sure everyone is aware of them. What tags can you use in your campaigns? There are five types of information you can pass on with the tags/URLs. Three of them should always be used: Campaign source (utm_source) - identifies where the traffic comes from, eg newsletter, google. Campaign medium (utm_medium) – advertising or marketing medium, eg cpc, email. Campaign name (utm_campaign) – what the campaign is called whether it's a promo code or specific promotion, eg winter sale. The other two, whilst not required by Google, are useful for tracking additional information: Campaign term (utm_term) - identifies paid search keywords if you’re manually tagging your paid keyword campaigns, eg red shoes. Campaign content (utm_content) – helps differentiate between same type of content or links, useful when doing AB testing or using multiple calls to action, eg logo or text link. How to tag your campaigns? It’s easier than you might think. You can do it manually if you know how, but the available URL builder tools online make it super simple to tag your links correctly. But if you're using Adwords or Bing then you can enable auto-tagging so you don't have to worry about tagging them. For websites use the Google URL builder tool to append URL parameters. For Android, use the Google Play URL builder tool to append URL parameters. You also must have Google Play Campaign Attribution set up in your Android SDK. For iOS, use the iOS Campaign Tracking URL Builder to append URL parameters. You must use Google Analytics iOS SDK v3 or higher for this to work. For manual tagging, you need to enter a question mark after the URL and before adding your parameters. Then pair up the parameters with their values, eg utm_source=newsletter, and separate campaign parameters with an ampersand. After the question mark, parameters can be placed in any order. You'll end up with a link that'll look something like this: http://www.littledata.io/?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=welcome, which is ready for use in your promo activities. Auto-tag your campaigns To make campaign tracking and tagging simpler, we have created a tool in Google Sheets that automatically creates a tagged up link. You'll need to fill the values for parameters and the formula will do the rest for you. To use it, you'll need to make a copy to store in your own Drive (via File option). Get campaign tracking sheet with URL builder   Got questions? Comment below or get in touch!

2016-01-06

Try the top-rated Google Analytics app for Shopify stores

Get a 30-day free trial of Littledata for Google Analytics or Segment