Why doesn't Shopify analytics match Google Analytics? [ebook]

Shopify analytics is fine for what it is: a siloed data source that is good at tracking Shopify orders. But if you want to track the complete customer journey and get accurate marketing data, you need to look elsewhere. Because it's both free and flexible, Google Analytics has become a top choice for a "single source of truth" to supplement Shopify analytics and other tools you might be using. And GA4, the newest version of Google Analytics, promises to be even more powerful. In our experience with hundreds of customers at Littledata we've found that many merchants turn to overblown solutions outside of GA (eg. fancy dashboards and generic data connectors) and then come back around to wanting to just fix the data in Google Analytics. After all, what good is the data if you can't trust it? Free ebook on Shopify and Google Analytics It's well known that Shopify's own analytics connection misses out on key issues like product list views, repeat purchases and marketing attribution. But where exactly does the tracking go wrong? What's going on behind the scenes? This new ebook is an insider's guide to Shopify Analytics vs Google Analytics. You will learn: Why transactions go missing in Google Analytics Common issues for Shopify stores The difference between marketing tags and Google Tag Manager How to set up checkout funnel tracking And all of the main reasons why Shopify doesn't match GA Download the ebook >>> Top brands turn to GA for a single source of truth, but there are some common things that go wrong. Even if you don't have a custom setup, things go wrong quickly -- including the "basics" like tracking ecommerce orders. We built Littledata to fix these issues automatically, saving you time and money. (Here's a quick demo video and our complete spec). But before you get into the details of the solution, it's important to understand the problem and what might be going wrong for your store in particular, whether you're seeing a lot of traffic that appears to be "Direct" but is actually from marketing channels like Facebook Ads or Klaviyo email marketing, you're missing repeat purchasing data, or your checkout funnel tracking is somehow out of whack. Get the ebook today. How to add Google Analytics to Shopify You can set up Enhanced Ecommerce in Google Analytics and then add Google Analytics to Shopify, but Shopify's default GA integration misses many key elements. [tip]With Shopify's default Google Analytics integration, 12 orders go missing for every 100 in Shopify. We highly recommend using an advanced data connector instead![/tip] If you would rather just get accurate data automatically, check out Littledata's 30-day free trial. It's the easiest way to avoid all of the known issues with Shopify's default Google Analytics integration. Plus, you still own the data in GA, whether or not you continue using our advanced data connections. [subscribe]

by Ari
2021-05-20

Optimizing Littledata's Shopify tracking script for speed and accuracy

At Littledata we know that page load speeds are essential for ecommerce success, and we have made some major improvements to our Shopify apps this month to improve both page speed and data accuracy. Having benchmarked over 20,000 ecommerce sites, and worked closely with larger DTC brands on Littledata Plus plans, we are well aware that technical factors such as page load speed are major drivers of ecommerce conversion rates. We have always had a minimal, super-fast script and GTM data layer, but v9 brings this to a whole new level. [subscribe] What’s new in LittledataLayer v9? The need for speed is driving some of our customers to headless setups, but for many stores there are lots of optimizations to be had from their existing Shopify theme and apps. Littledata’s main advance in this area is our server-side tracking, which means that our app has zero impact on your add to cart, checkout or payment steps. So the changes in v9 are focused on the landing pages, product listing pages and product details pages. The latest update improves both page speed and the accuracy of the data we track Some of the major improvements in LittledataLayer v9 are: Tracking all product list impressions, on whatever pages they are displayedThe correct product variant is tracked, if the listing is for a specific variantProducts loaded after the initial page load (i.e. "lazy-loaded" products) will also be trackedListing pages of more than 50 products (e.g. infinite scroll pages) are tracked In addition we’ve improved how some types of checkout are tracked, to ensure the marketing attribution of the order is correct, for: Buy Now buttons leading to an accelerated checkout (e.g. Paypal, Google Pay)Headless stores leading to a Shopify checkoutCustom checkouts which do not reuse the same Shopify cart token See our help center for more details about how tracking product list views works as the user scrolls down the page. All these changes will be automatically added for current customers, unless you opt out and choose manual updates, in which case you will need to manually upgrade. Please contact your account manager if you are unsure which option to take. [note]Unless you opt for manual updates, we will now automatically update the snippet Littledata adds to your Shopify store[/note] How does v9 of the Littledata tracking script improve page load speed? To send accurate product list views, product list clicks and product detail views, our app builds a data layer containing all the products on the page. This is true for both our Segment app and our Google Analytics app in the Shopify app store. Building this data layer on Shopify’s servers took time before the page was ever seen by a user; in this improved version we get the product data after the user has interacted with the page. This results in almost no impact to page load speeds from adding Littledata’s app, as measured by PageSpeed Insights - improving the score from 62% to 70%. And yes, a score of 73 out of 100 is not very impressive...but for our test store we haven’t done all the good things you should be doing to optimize your store, like compression and lazy-loading of images. So whatever your page speed was before the improvements, it should be up to 10 percentage points higher now. Speed test So how did we make the latest snippet faster? To start, it’s no longer requiring the same liquid code. We can see the difference using Shopify’s speed profiler extension for Chrome. Before the changes Shopify is spending over 80ms (out of 155ms total) processing the LittledataLayer snippet - and this test store does not have a particularly complex list of products. After changing to v9, we see this has dropped to less than 1ms, because now all the product data is fetched asynchronously from Shopify’s APIs as the user interacts with the page. The good news is that this comes at no cost to data accuracy. Our script already tracked the product impressions after the page load - now we wait to get the product data until it is really needed. As a key part of the modern data stack for DTC brands, we are always investing in efficiency and accuracy at Littledata. Schedule a demo to learn more, and let us know if you have suggestions for further technical improvements! [subscribe]

2021-04-19

For every 100 orders in Shopify, 12 go missing

If you’re using Shopify’s default Google Analytics tracking you might have noticed that the revenue in Google Analytics never matches what you see in the Shopify dashboard. This is a big problem: missing orders means orders that can’t be attributed to marketing campaigns, whether those channels are paid or organic. Littledata’s improved Google Analytics app for Shopify increases order throughput to Google Analytics from worse than 90% to better than 99.9% -- and it works automatically in the data layer. How big is the problem? We sampled a set of larger DTC brands on Shopify, together processing 50,000 orders a month through a standard Shopify checkout. Looking at a month of traffic, we compared the paid orders for these Shopify stores with the Thank You pages tracked in Google Analytics. Remarkably, only 88% of orders were tracked on average, ranging from 78% tracked in the worst store setup to 96% in the best store. That is a big loss. For every 10,000 orders processed, 1,200 were going missing. Assuming each of those customers cost $50 to acquire, that is $60,000 of marketing spend which can't be attributed to sales. Whatever the CAC for your ecommerce brand, you can’t afford to miss significant data like this about transactions, not to mention the marketing campaigns that led to those sales in the first place! For every 10,000 orders processed, 1,200 went missing Revenue aside, what about those 1,200 customers who are likely still being retargeted by abandoned checkout campaigns, even though they did complete the checkout process? There is a good case to be made for remarketing to your best customers for upsells, cross-sells, referrals and more. But remarketing to your new customer base as if they never made a purchase is certainly bad business. And it gets worse. When I looked at 10 stores that have non-standard checkout setups, using apps such as ReCharge or CartHook, the percentage of orders tracked (excluding recurring orders) ranged from a pathetic 9% up to a disappointing 70%. Shopify’s order tracking relies on customers seeing the Shopify Thank You page, and many other checkouts do not immediately redirect there. What are the main reasons for missing transactions in Google Analytics? Littledata has had five years of experience debugging GA tracking, so at this point we’ve pretty much seen it all. In fact, it's the most common question our sales team hears: why doesn't my data in Shopify match my data in Google Analytics? The ecommerce ecosystem is constantly evolving, including headless setups and subscriptions in the Shopify checkout. But some things remain the same. The most common problem areas for disappearing orders are: 1. Users not waiting for the Thank You page to load Many tech-savvy buyers know that your store will email them an order confirmation, so if they’re in a hurry - and the thank you page takes a few seconds - why should they wait? This is especially true with payment gateways like PayPal, which have their own payment confirmation page. 2. Thank you page overloaded with marketing tags Most order tracking relies on a script to fire on the thank you page, and if your store has lots of these scripts then it could take 10+ seconds before the crucial Google Analytics script is run. Customers won’t wait 10 seconds to see a page which has no value for them. 3. Draft orders paid at a later date Does your store create draft orders? This is more common for B2B stores, and means the order is completed well after the customer web session finishes. That means no thank you page, so no way to track the orders in a standard GA implementation. 4. Third-party checkouts That Thank You page on Shopify may never appear at all if your store uses third-party checkouts. 5. Recurring orders Like paid draft orders, recurring orders are payments that happen outside of the customer’s web session. The user never goes through a checkout or sees the thank you page. 6. Duplicate tracking Refreshing the order confirmation page, or clicking through on an order confirmation email to view the page again, might cause another transaction event to be fired from the page. [tip]Get the free ebook about why Shopify doesn't match Google Analytics[/tip] How is Littledata’s tracking different? Littledata offers server-side order tracking, hooking into the order creation in Shopify after the payment has been made. That allows us to track draft orders paid after the event, recurring orders, and orders through channels like Amazon that don’t use the Shopify Checkout. It also allows us to add refunds back in real-time, so you can track net sales against marketing channels. Littledata de-duplicates all orders, so an order is only ever reported once - giving a 100% match with what is in Shopify admin. Server-side tracking ensures complete analytics If you want to compare like-for-like, as I did for this article, our app also sends a ‘Thank you page’ event (in the same way the order tracking done in Shopify’s standard setup). This event can also be used to trigger Google Tag Manager tags, using the built-in GTM data layer. Interested in improving your Google Analytics setup? You might be interested in 6 common reasons why GA is not accurate and how Littledata’s Google Analytics app works. [subscribe]

2021-04-08

Advanced Google Analytics integration for Ordergroove subscriptions

We are excited to announce a new Ordergroove connection. Any Shopify store using Ordergroove for subscriptions can now take advantage of Littledata's server-side tracking for advanced analytics. The new connection lets you automatically track online sales, marketing, and recurring payments in Segment, Google Analytics, or any connected data warehouse or reporting tool. What's more, it is available on all Littledata plans at no additional cost. Many Shopify stores are finding success with subscriptions, whether that's all or part of their online business. And this year we expect even more brands to move to subscription platforms like Ordergroove rather than trying to build and maintain in-house solutions to manage subscribers. This is especially true for larger DTC brands on Shopify Plus. Ordergroove integration with Google Analytics Ordergroove is a popular subscription solution for larger brands on Shopify, Salesforce, Magento and BigCommerce. Ordergroove offers a single checkout experience for Shopify Plus merchants, and brands like Intelligentsia Coffee and 4Ocean use Ordergroove’s integrated cart experience to maximize recurring revenue. Ordergroove's technology partners offer a range of integrations to help you scale. Littledata's new Ordergroove integration offers a seamless data pipeline for any Shopify store using Ordergroove for subscriptions. (Coming soon for BigCommerce too!) Google Analytics Google Analytics is extremely powerful once you know how to use it. Littledata has long been a leader in subscription analytics, and GA is our tool of choice. We're also especially excited about GA4 these days. But Google Analytics tracking often goes wrong for Shopify stores, resulting in order throughput of less than 90% (we have a good ebook on this). Common issues include: Lots of "Direct" traffic (transactions not linked to browsing behavior)Issues with thank you page tracking (doesn't load completely, too many marketing tags, etc.)Recurring orders either not tracked at all or look like orphan sessionsCustom themes breaking Shopify's default GA integration We built Littledata to fix these issues automatically, especially for subscription stores, where seeing details like LTV by channel can make or break a business. Littledata uses a combination of client-side and server-side tracking to give you one source of truth in Google Analytics: Complete sales data, including subscriptions and refundsAccurate marketing attribution for all transactions, including recurring ordersCustom dimensions for customer lifetime value (LTV/CLTV)Payment gateway trackingAnd much more! The Ordergroove integration works automatically with our Shopify/Shopify Plus to Google Analytics connection. You can install the connection directly from the Shopify app store. After installation, follow this quick guide to our recommended Google Analytics setup, which includes a special View in GA for one-time orders and first-time subscriptions (ie. filtering out recurring payments). [tip]Eager to track subscription lifecycle events? Sign up for beta access to v2 of our Ordergroove connection[/tip] If you are using a headless Shopify setup, please see our guide to headless tracking. Google Tag Manager Ordergroove works directly in the Shopify checkout, and Littledata's GTM and Google Analytics data layer makes it easy to track the pre-checkout journey as well as what happens in the checkout funnel. We add detailed events which you can use to build funnels or trigger other marketing tags in Google Tag Manager (GTM). At the same time, many brands find that our default schema is more than enough to fill their data needs and nothing custom is needed. Either way, our ecommerce tracking is highly scalable and extensible. Book a demo to learn more -- we are happy to chat about your data stack and see if Littledata is a good fit! Ordergroove integration with Segment Littledata also sends complete ecommerce events to Segment to match their ecommerce spec. Whether you are just considering Segment implementation or already far along the journey of using Segment for your data warehouse and marketing destinations, let our Shopify source for Segment do the heavy lifting so you can get back to business. Book a demo to learn more. [subscribe]

by Ari
2021-03-30

Enhanced Ecommerce Tracking in Google Analytics (VIDEO)

By now you know that Littledata sends accurate ecommerce data to Google Analytics. But how does it work? In this new video, we cover Littledata's Enhanced Ecommerce tracking for Shopify stores. Littledata's Google Analytics connection for Shopify stores uses a combination of client-side and server-side tracking to guarantee 100% accurate data. During the automatic installation process, Littledata adds a data layer and tracking script to all your Shopify store pages. We also add a set of webhooks to make sure everything is captured. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-c7ULfatrWU There are many advantages to this approach: On the client side... Works with Google Tag Manager (GTM) Faster page speed Consistent journey tracking On the server side... Ensures complete event capture for the checkout flow Safe & secure checkout process All sales & refunds are tracked Works with headless Shopify, multi-currency stores, and more! Accurate marketing attribution for Shopify & any subscription checkout [subscribe] Littledata sends these events to Google Analytics in three categories: Shopify Order Affiliation ReCharge (for stores that have a ReCharge subscription checkout) The Shopify (Littledata) event categories include the combined client-side and server-side tracked event actions, as follows: The Order Affiliation (Littledata) tracks each Shopify order as an event action, with the e-commerce affiliate type as its event label: For Shopify stores that use ReCharge, we send all customer lifecycle events in Google Analytics under the ReCharge (Littledata) event category: Analyze growth rates and subscriber behavior in greater detail. [note]In GA4, the latest version of Google Analytics, there are no default ecommerce reports. Learn more about ecommerce reporting in GA4[/note] Resources Watch a quick demo video Learn how to track the Shopify checkout funnel (and the ReCharge and CartHook checkouts) Check out our Shopify to Google Analytics FAQ  Subscribe to our YouTube Channel for more videos about ecommerce analytics  

2021-03-18

Can you still install Universal Analytics?

Google recently released a new version of Google Analytics called GA4. But until things are ironed out with GA4, you might still want to install Universal Analytics (the previous version of Google Analytics, sometimes now referred to as GA3). For the time being, it's still possible to create a new Universal Analytics property in your GA account. It just takes a couple of extra clicks. This quick guide will show how to to create a UA property. What is Google Analytics? At this point, who hasn't heard of Google? Not only does the company have over a 92% share of the search engine market, but they have come to dominate analytics. Google Analytics is a very popular data tool. Originally designed to track web behavior, including marketing channels and landing pages, Analytics has evolved to offer much more, including advanced functionality like: Cross-domain tracking to capture every customer touchpointComparative attribution modelsAdvanced segmentation and audience building (ie LTV cohorts) Google Analytics is used (or at least installed) by over half of all websites, but over 70% of the top sites use GA, and many use Google Tag Manager as well, for custom tracking to capture details like custom checkouts or Pinterest Ads. [note]Learn more about Littledata's GTM Data Layer for Shopify stores[/note] Google Analytics is deceptively simple. In fact, 88% of Shopify stores have Google Analytics set up incorrectly. But if it is set up correctly, either with a data pipeline like Littledata or a manual setup from a developer or agency, and you take the time to learn how to use the data, it can be invaluable to your business growth. Plus, it's free! Very big stores do need to pay for GA360 once they exceed the data threshold, but as we've noted recently the move to GA4 appears to be part of a larger move away from charging for analytics at all -- even for larger brands. This includes data destinations like BigQuery. We created Littledata to automatically fix ecommerce tracking in Google Analytics, whether you're just looking for accureate sales and marketing data or a more complex data warehouse setup. Our app is currently optimized for Universal Analytics, but our GA4 connection is already in private beta development. We see the event-based tracking and flexibility of GA4 as the wave of the future, but recognize the need for UA in the meantime. How to install Universal Analytics instead of GA4 When you set up a new Google Analytics property, you can choose between GA4, Universal Analytics, or both. Go to the Admin Settings in your Google Analytics account (if you don't have a Google Analytics account yet, it's free and easy to create one). From your Property Settings, click on + Create Property. Give your property a name. Then click Show advanced options under Property Setup (this is essential!). Click the slider on Create a Universal Analytics property. This will allow you to set up a new property in Google Analytics for GA4, Universal Analytics, or both. Add your Website URL (you can't create a property without a URL). You now have two options. Either select Create both a Google Analytics 4 and a Universal Analytics property to create both types of properties (you can play with them later). Or select Create a Universal Analytics property only if you really only want to create a UA property. [note]We recommend setting up both a Universal Analytics property and a Google Analytics 4 property, and using them in parallel so you can compare the tracking.[/note] Click Next and fill out the form if desired. Then click Create to finish the setup. That's it! You've now created a new property with the old version of GA. You can find your new Tracking ID and Tracking Number (or Measurement ID for GA4) in your Google Analytics admin. For UA, go to Property > Tracking Info > Tracking Code. Note that you can install Littledata's Shopify to Google Analytics connection for any store using Universal Analytics, but our GA4 connection is in private beta. If you are interested in parallel tracking -- or just testing GA4 for ecommerce -- contact us for info on our beta program. [subscribe]

by Ari
2021-03-15

What's the real ROI on your Facebook Ads? [webinar]

Is your FB/Insta ad spend leading to high LTV customers? What happens after a shopper clicks on a link? One thing is clear: you've got to get the tracking right before you can start making data-driven decisions. Join Littledata and Beacon on Thursday, March 4th for a free webinar where we will explore the details of marketing attribution and Facebook campaign ROI. Pretty much all ecommerce brands today are using Facebook and Instagram ads as part of their digital marketing mix. When it comes to Facebook Ads, marketers are drawn to messaging about a strong return on investment. But are you measuring that return correctly? In this free webinar, you'll learn:  Common issues with marketing attribution How to track post-click shopping behavior (what happens after someone clicks an ad) The importance of using external platforms for an unbiased view of marketing channels How to calculate complete ROI for your Facebook and Instagram Ad spend, including repeat purchases, refunds, and customer lifetime value (LTV) How benchmarking your site against similar brands can help make sense of the data Signup for the free webinar >>> About Littledata Littledata automatically fixes tracking for Shopify stores, offering complete marketing attribution, accurate sales data, and custom dimensions for lifetime value reporting. Check out our Shopify app for Google Analytics Learn more about our Shopify source for Segment Try Littledata's Facebook Ads connection free for 30 days Signup for the free webinar >>> About Beacon Beacon is the digital marketing campaign intelligence platform that is easy-to-use and presents real-time information based on data you can trust. It empowers marketers to accurately measure campaign results, take back control of their digital spend, and get a better ROI on their campaigns. Signup for the free webinar >>>

by Ari
2021-03-01

Replacing Additional Google Analytics JavaScript for Shopify stores

On 1st March 2021 Shopify is permanently removing scripts added in the ‘Additional Google Analytics JavaScript’ preference. This field has been hidden for some time, but was previously used to inject all kinds of additional scripts into the checkout pages. Why is Shopify removing these additional scripts? Primarily they represent a security risk: injecting key-stroke-tracking scripts into checkout pages is a common way to steal credit card information. Shopify just can’t take the risk that if the store admin gets hacked, so could the customer card details. Additionally, being able to customise the Shopify checkout pages (via the checkout.liquid file) is a key feature of Shopify Plus and so a reason for stores to upgrade to Plus. How to replace Google Analytics code added in this Additional JavaScript field I know many stores were using this preference for exactly the reason it intended: to modify the functionality of the Universal Analytics tracking script Shopify adds, if configured in the online store preferences. The good news is that the scripts you need to run (excluding the checkout) can be added in the theme <head>. You can add settings or events to GA’s command queue, which get executed when the Universal Analytics (GA) library is ready. You need to add this line of code before any additional commands below, to ensure that: If the ga function is defined already, calls to ga() are queued If the ga function is not yet defined, calls to ga() are added to a new queue [dm_code_snippet background="yes" background-mobile="yes" slim="yes" bg-color="#abb8c3" theme="light" language="javascript" wrapped="yes" copy-text="Copy Code" copy-confirmed="Copied"] window.ga=window.ga||function(){(ga.q=ga.q||[]).push(arguments)};ga.l=+new Date; [/dm_code_snippet] Shopify Plus stores can do the same thing on checkout.liquid to customise Google Analytics tracking on the checkout pages. Here are some of the common uses of Additional JavaScript, and alternatives I know of: 1. Anonymising IP address GDPR regulation in Europe requires stores not to send full IP addresses to Google’s servers in the US. You can opt out in GA by using this - but it will NOT affect pageviews sent from the checkout. [dm_code_snippet background="yes" background-mobile="yes" slim="yes" bg-color="#abb8c3" theme="light" language="javascript" wrapped="yes" copy-text="Copy Code" copy-confirmed="Copied"] ga('set', 'anonymizeIp', true); [/dm_code_snippet] 2. Tracking checkout steps To measure how far users get in the checkout, and with what products, many stores want to track checkout steps in GA. Shopify does track pageviews and some events from the checkout (not including product values), but unfortunately you can no longer add a script on Shopify’s checkout. However, Littledata’s app has a more robust solution to send checkout step events and pageviews from our servers. Tracking the checkout steps across all checkouts, including third party checkouts on ReCharge and CartHook, enables stores to retarget abandoned checkouts with Google Ads and understand how shipping and payment options affect checkout conversion. 3. Cross-domain linking Shopify already accepts incoming cross-domain tracking, but to add cross-domain tracking to links from your Shopify store you need to instruct GA to automatically decorate links: [dm_code_snippet background="yes" background-mobile="yes" slim="yes" bg-color="#abb8c3" theme="light" language="javascript" wrapped="yes" copy-text="Copy Code" copy-confirmed="Copied"] ga('linker:autoLink', ['yourblog.com']); [/dm_code_snippet] For more examples on when you need to set up cross-domain linking (for example, to third-party checkouts), see our cross-domain Shopify tracking guide. 4. Tracking logged-in users To enable a registered users view in Google Analytics you need to send a customer ID when known. The window-scope object `__st` includes that `cid` field, when the user is logged in. [dm_code_snippet background="yes" background-mobile="yes" slim="yes" bg-color="#abb8c3" theme="light" language="javascript" wrapped="yes" copy-text="Copy Code" copy-confirmed="Copied"] if(__st["cid"]) ga('set', '&uid', __st["cid"]); [/dm_code_snippet] 5. Tracking additional events You may want to trigger additional GA events, like clicks on a particular button. I’d recommend you set these up using Google Tag Manager, but you can also run a SEND command at any stage and it will send to the GA tracker Shopify loads on the page. [dm_code_snippet background="yes" background-mobile="yes" slim="yes" bg-color="#abb8c3" theme="light" language="javascript" wrapped="yes"] ga('send', 'event', 'List Filter', 'Change size filter', 'XL'); [/dm_code_snippet] 6. Tracking additional web properties Many stores need multiple tracking IDs to send data to multiple web properties, and Shopify by default only allows a single property.  I’d again recommend you set these up using Google Tag Manager, but you can also run a CREATE command in your head to track to additional properties. [dm_code_snippet background="yes" background-mobile="yes" slim="yes" bg-color="#abb8c3" theme="light" language="javascript" wrapped="yes" copy-text="Copy Code" copy-confirmed="Copied"] ga('create', 'UA-XXXXXXXX-X', 'auto'); [/dm_code_snippet] 7. Adding GTM triggers If you are using Google Tag Manager to fire other marketing tags you might have used the Additional JavaScript to run triggers - for example when customers completed an order. This could be replaced by using Littledata’s GTM data layer, which is included with our Google Analytics app.  The final result Assuming you just need items 1 and 4 from the list above, this is how the script tag in your liquid theme might look: [dm_code_snippet background="yes" background-mobile="yes" slim="yes" bg-color="#abb8c3" theme="light" language="html" wrapped="yes" copy-text="Copy Code" copy-confirmed="Copied"] <head> … <script> // Scripts moved from Additional Google Analytics JavaScript preferences window.ga=window.ga||function(){(ga.q=ga.q||[]).push(arguments)};ga.l=+new Date; ga('set', 'anonymizeIp', true); if(__st["cid"]) ga('set', '&uid', __st["cid"]); </script> </head> [/dm_code_snippet] Is there anything else your store has added? Let me know and we can add it to the list.

2021-02-22

Try the top-rated Google Analytics app for Shopify stores

Get a 30-day free trial of Littledata for Google Analytics or Segment