How to see shopping behaviour for each product you sell (VIDEO)

Product performance can seem confusing, but it doesn't have to be. In this quick video, we show you how to use Google Analytics to see shopping behaviour related to each product you're selling. All you'll need to see this report is a site connected to Google Analytics with the Enhanced Ecommerce plugin setup. [embed]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YVGAdHTkw3s[/embed] Using the Shopping Behavior report in Google Analytics Whether your ecommerce site is large or small, the Shopping Behavior report makes it easy to drill deep into user behaviour to understand why some products are converting better than others. If a particular product isn't selling well, the Shopping Behavior report will help you figure out why. It shows how far shoppers engage with your products, from initial list views through to shopping cart activities. [subscribe] Reasons a product might not be selling well It isn't at an optimal place in a product list or display The product details, such as images and description, aren't sending the right message Customers are abandoning their shopping carts completely, or removing that particular product (or group of products, such as multiple pairs of jeans) after adding it Who knows? You haven't audited your Google Analytics setup lately so your customer behaviour data can't be trusted to help you improve Each of those issues requires different actions, sometimes by entirely different departments (ie. marketing, pricing, ux)! That's what makes the Shopping Behavior report so important for improving ecommerce sales and conversions. We hope you enjoyed this latest video in our series of Google Analytics how-to guides. Need help setting up Enhanced Ecommerce in Google Analytics, or ensuring that your data is accurate? Contact a Littledata consultant today.

2017-09-14

5 (bad) reasons not to do a Google Analytics audit

Does this sound familiar? 'We know our data's bad, but we don't have the time or resources to fix it'. Or, even worse: 'I checked a bunch of other metrics and they didn't justify our current ad spend, so I think I'll just present that same old report at the meeting today...again. Luckily we haven't fixed our Google Analytics setup to track too much relevant data about other marketing channels, or to connect those channels directly to revenue, because then we might need to change our whole strategy!' There's still a lot of confusion out there about the role and scope of an analytics audit. With a free audit tool directly in the  app, Littledata is on a mission to change this. Here are some (slightly exaggerated) versions of common objections to doing an analytics audit, and how to overcome them. 1. You don't know what a Google Analytics audit is Okay, not to start this somewhat ironic post with an entirely un-ironic objection, but not understanding the process is probably the only good reason not to audit your analytics setup. Luckily an analytics audit is actually very straightforward: it's simply a check of your analytics configuration and implementation. Some consultants and last-gen apps can make the audit process seem confusing and disorienting. If that's been your experience, we're here to help. Our free Google Analytics audit tool explains the process in real time. Not only that, but many tracking and reporting issues can be fixed automatically by the app (hello, intelligent algorithm!). 2. You don't believe in marketing ROI There are a lot of fluffy tools out there. Google Analytics isn't one of them. It's not that all digital marketers take action based on analytics, but a majority of the top ones do. That's what makes them the best. If you need convincing that accurate data is the secret sauce behind higher marketing ROI (return on investment), check out the recent Google Analytics research with Econsultancy, where they found that '60% of leading marketers routinely take action based on analytics, and are also 48% more likely than mainstream marketers to say their strategy is strongly data-driven'. 3. You trust everything you read online Failing to audit your analytics setup is basically the same as believing that everything you read online is true, no matter the source. Why? Because bad data produces bad reports. This is true no matter how fancy your reporting templates might be, or how much time you've spent making spreadsheets of Google Analytics data look accessible. Unless you regularly audit your analytics setup, how do you know if you're tracking the right things in the right manner? This is especially true if you're using an otherwise awesome ecommerce platform like Shopify, which has notoriously questionable tracking that also happens to be easy to fix with the right analytics app. [subscribe] 4. You think that the customer is always wrong Customer happiness isn't just a buzzword, it's increasingly what's driving the growth and expansion of online businesses, especially in the ecommerce space. Big players like Amazon learned this early on, and they built an effective - and addictive - customer experience around heaps of data on everything from affiliate ads to repeat buying activity. Think you don't have access to those same tools? Think again. If you want to build a better customer experience, it's essential to start with the correct Google Analytics setup and end the guessing games about where your leads and customers come from, and how they act. That's where the audit comes in. 5. You're betting on failure Are you betting that your own company will fail? Unless you secretly run an ecommerce hedge fund and have shorted your own startup, this is probably a bad idea. Auditing your data tracking across the customer life cycle is a sure way to see what's working, what's not, and what can be improved. Otherwise you're stuck with bad data and revenue tracking that might not have much to do with the reality - or the future - of your online business. Is there a better way? Look, we get it. Change can be scary, but choosing to stay stuck in the same data rut isn't the way forward. We've helped over a thousand online businesses fix their Google Analytics setup to capture accurate, relevant data. Littledata's industry-leading automated audit tool is free to run as often as you'd like. Sign up today and start trusting your data.

by Ari
2017-09-07

How to set up Site Search tracking in Google Analytics (VIDEO)

What are visitors searching for on your website? Watch this quick video to learn how to set up Site Search tracking in Google Analytics. Site Search makes it easy to track search activity on your site. In the video we show you how to: Set up Site Search for a web property connected to your Google Analytics account Understand which query parameters you're using, and apply them to your Site Search setup View the resulting search metrics, including visits with search, total unique searches, specific search terms (what web visitors are searching for), and search depth Tracking on-site search terms is surprisingly easy! All you'll need to get started is a Google Analytics account and a search box on your site. [embed]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OlsMBWFt5aQ[/embed] What are visitors searching for on your site? On-site search is one of the things we scan for with our free Google Analytics audit tool. Many online businesses forget to add this to their Google Analytics setup, focusing instead on external search data such as that from Google AdWords (or ignoring search activity altogether!), but this is a mistake. Capturing on-site search terms is essential for any online business that that is serious about growth. Understanding what web visitors are searching for - and how that leads to deep engagement with your site or app - can help you improve site UX (user experience), develop product offerings which your customers are already hungry for, and get a higher ROI from product marketing campaigns and ad spend. For more details on the Site Search feature and how to identify search query parameters, check out the Google Analytics help guide. Still have questions? The Littledata team is always here to help. You can contact us directly in the app, or feel free to connect with our Google Analytics consultants for larger projects. [subscribe] Hint: Use search-related benchmarks to find out how your on-site search traffic compares with other sites in your industry and location. The Littledata app includes analytics benchmarks to make this as easy as possible. For example, you can compare usage of internal search on your website against internal search usage on all websites. Once you've set up Site Search, you will automatically be able to see relevant search-related benchmarks in your Littledata dashboard.  

2017-09-06

How to add tracking for multiple websites or apps (VIDEO)

If you're tracking multiple sites or apps in Google Analytics, you can connect all of these views to your Littledata account and easily switch between them. Watch this quick video to learn how to add or remove a Google Analytics data source in the Littledata app. [embed]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xoISTTx1zlw[/embed] FAQs - Working with multiple Google Analytics views How do Littledata reports link to Google Analytics views? When you click to set up another site you will see a list of all the Google Analytics properties and views linked to your Google account. Typically you will only be interested in one of the views, which contains data for the site or app you are working on. When you select a view, Littledata fetches the data it needs to enable core features such as our intelligent Google Analytics audit and industry benchmarking. Note that this doesn't commit you to purchase anything. The underlying data in your Google Analytics account is not affected unless you opt-in to our automated fixes, which let you automatically fix particular aspects of your Google Analytics setup. [subscribe] How many websites or apps can I track? You can set up standard reporting for as many websites as you like. However, if you're using Littledata's Pro services for advanced custom reporting, this is priced per view or data source. You can switch between these sites using the drop-down menu in the top bar. Does your reporting work with mobile app properties? Right now, some of the features will work - such as dashboards, alerts and buyer personas - but audit and benchmarking are specifically for websites. How do I add or remove a site? Once you've connected multiple web properties to your Littledata account, you can manage them using the My Sites page under the profile photo drop-down menu in the upper right. Can Littledata handle micro-sites? Yes. If each micro-site have it's own Google Analytics view, then go ahead and connect them all to your Littledata account. If the micro-sites are all under one web view, then ask the Littledata team about custom solutions to create a multi-site dashboard that lets you visualise Google Analytics data from many micro-sites and benchmark against each other. We have done this for a range of customers and are happy to discuss the details of what is involved in reporting on multiple micro-sites, whether just a few or several hundred!

2017-08-02

Why are my transactions coming from Direct or Referral in Google Analytics with no marketing attribution?

Connecting marketing data with sales data is an age-old problem, and the crowded digital landscape has made this even more complicated. Google Analytics is supposed to give you the power to attribute sales (or purchase transactions) back to marketing campaigns, but this doesn't happen automatically. [note]Frustrated by data mismatches in Shopify analytics <> Google Analytics? There's a guide for that! Learn how you can reconcile your data mismatches automatically[/note] The good news is that it's entirely possible to get the right marketing channel attribution for sales activities. Accurate marketing attribution starts with the right Google Analytics (GA) setup. Start by asking yourself the following troubleshooting questions: Have you got a large enough sample to compare data? Is the tracking script set up on your purchase confirmation page? Do you have a cross-domain tracking problem? Is your marketing campaign tagging complete? (For subscription stores) Are you looking at only first-time payments? Are you marketing mostly via offline campaigns, word of mouth marketing or mobile apps? These steps will help you figure out if your Google Analytics setup is correct, and how to use GA to get a complete view of user behaviour. A trustworthy GA setup takes a bit of work, but with a smart analytics dashboard like Littledata, much of that work can be automated. In fact, steps 1 through 4 can be checked automatically with our free Google Analytics audit tool. First things first: are you checking the right report? The best way to see marketing attribution is in the 'Channels' report in Google Analytics, under the 'Acquisition' section: Do you have a large enough sample size to compare data? Firstly, can you be sure the sales are representative? If you only have two sales, and both are ‘Direct’, that could be a fluke. We recommend selecting a long enough time period to look at more than 50 transactions before judging, as with this example: Is the tracking script set up on your purchase confirmation page? It you are getting some transactions recorded, but not 100%, then it may be possible to optimise the actual tracking script setup. See our technical guide to ecommerce tracking. This can be a particular problem if many of your sales are on mobile, since slower page load speeds on mobile may be blocking the tracking script more often. Do you have a cross-domain tracking problem? If you see many of your sales under Referral, and when you click through the list of referrers it includes payment gateways (e.g. mybank.com or shopify.com), that is a tell-tale sign you have a cross-domain problem. This means that when the buyer is referred back from the payment domain (e.g. paypal.com), their payment is not linked with the original session. [tip]Did you know you can track your customers' PayPal orders in Google Analytics?[/tip] This is almost always a problem for Shopify stores, which is why our Shopify app is essential for accurate tracking. Is your marketing campaign tagging complete? For many types of campaign (Facebook, email, etc.), unless you tag the link with correct UTM parameters, the source of the purchaser will not be tracked. So if a user clicks on an untagged Facebook Ad link on their Facebook mobile app (which is where 80 – 90% of Facebook users engage) then the source of their visit will be ‘Direct’ (not Social). Untagged email campaigns are a particular issue if you run abandoned cart / basket emails, as these untagged links will be 'stealing' the sales which should be attributed to whatever got the buyer to add to cart. Tagging is a real problem for Instagram, since currently the profile link is shown in full - and looks really messy if you include all the UTM parameters. We recommend using a service like Bitly to redirect to your homepage (or an Instagram landing page). i.e. The link redirects to yoursite.com?utm_medium=social&utm_source=instragram&utm_campaign=profile_link. Check out Caitlin Brehm's guide to Instagram links. Are you looking at only first-time payments? (for Shopify subscription stores) Tracking the source of recurring payments is impossible, if the tracking setup was incorrect at the time of the first payment. Unfortunately, you can’t change Google Analytics retrospectively. So if you are using our ReCharge integration, and you want to track lifetime value, you will have to be patient for a few months as data from the correct tracking builds up. [tip]Here's a guide to calculating LTV in Google Analytics for your subscription store[/tip] Is most of your marketing via offline campaigns, word of mouth or mobile apps? It could be that your sales really are ‘direct’: If a buyer types in the URL from a business card or flyer, that is ‘Direct’. The only way to change this is to use a link shortener to redirect to a tagged-up link (see point 4 above). If a user pastes a link to your product in WhatsApp, that is ‘Direct’. If a user sees your product on Instagram and clicks on the profile link, that is ‘Direct’. See any further issues (including the ones above) that are causing your marketing attribution to be incorrect in GA? We can help! Get in touch with our team of Google Analytics consultants here.

2017-06-13

How to add account edit permissions for Google Analytics

Being able to edit the Google Analytics account is the 2nd highest permission level. You need this if you want to create a new web property in Google Analytics. To grant permissions to another user you will need the highest permission level yourself: being able to manage users on the account. [subscribe] Step 1: Go to account user settings page First click the admin cog in any view under the account in GA you want to change, and then in the left hand list go to User Settings   EITHER Select an existing user from the list and click the 'edit' checkbox OR Add a new user's email (must be a Google account) and check the 'edit' checkbox. Step 3: Check it's working Your colleague should now be able to see 'Create new property' under the list of properties in the middle of the Admin page.

2017-05-16

How to use Analytics for mobile apps: Google Analytics SDK vs Firebase

This is the third article in the Q&A series. I will be answering some of the most-asked questions about Google Analytics and how it works. If you’ve missed the previous articles, you can access Part 2 (What is the bounce rate in Google Analytics) and see what questions we answered there.   In this article, I will give you an answer to the following questions: How Google Analytics works for mobile apps? What are the differences between Firebase Analytics and Google Analytics? How Google Analytics works for mobile apps? Instead of using JavaScript, for mobile apps, you will be using an SDK. That is a Software Development Kit and it’s what collects the data from your mobile application. As most smartphones are either Android and iOS based, you will have different SDK’s based on the operating system. The SDK works similarly as the JavaScript and collects data like the number of users and sessions, the session duration, the operating system, the device model and the location. All of that is packed in hits and sent to your Google Analytics account. Here is an overview from The Google Analytics Help Center. The main difference is that the data is not sent right away. Because a mobile device might not have a connection to the internet at some points in time, the data is stored on the device and is sent when it is eventually connected. The process is called dispatching and it’s done at different time intervals on Android and on iOS. On Android, the hits are dispatched every 30 minutes and on iOS, every 2 minutes. Those numbers can be customised though. [subscribe heading="Need help with Google Analytics?" button_link="https://www.littledata.io/contact-us" button_text="SCHEDULE A DEMO"] Keep in mind that you can customise the code so that you can track different data in case you feel the base code is not sufficient for you. What are the differences between Firebase Analytics and Google Analytics? Firebase Analytics (FA) is another way to collect the event data. While Google Analytics is a general-purpose (and more web oriented) analytics tool, Firebase was built keeping mobile in mind. There are some things that were added in in the later and also things that are missing from GA. Here are some noteworthy points when considering Firebase Analytics: Real-time view is missing for Firebase Analytics (we mainly use this when testing the app for new events). Events are available after 4 to 6 hours in Firebase Analytics. The Behavior Flow is missing from Firebase Analytics (since there are no screen views logged). The Audiences feature is a big advantage that FA has. If you couple this with the Notifications it will allow you to engage with a specific group of users. If users experience a crash, then an audience group will be created automatically when using the Firebase Crash Reporting feature. Funnel analysis based on custom events is easier in FA. However, if you use Littledata, then this problem can be solved for Google Analytics with the custom reports that we can build. Some events are logged automatically in Firebase Analytics (for example the sessions based on the Activity life-cycle). Firebase has a relatively low methods footprint compared to the methods count that Google Analytics uses - making it less processor and network intensive. As a final point there are benefits for using both platforms to track your Analytics, but if you do focus your business on mobile applications, keep in mind that Firebase Analytics was created for mobile apps. Happy Reporting. Get Social! Follow us on LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook and keep up-to-date with our Google Analytics insights.

2017-04-11

Important update to Remarketing with Google Analytics

If you got this email from Google recently, or seen the blue notification bar at the top of Google Analytics, here's what is changing and how it affects your website. The big problem in modern online marketing is that most users have multiple devices, and the device they interact with the advert on is not the same as the one they convert on: [Google’s] research shows that six in ten internet users start shopping on one device but continue or finish on a different one. Facebook has been helping advertisers track conversion across devices for a few years  - because most Facebook ads are served on their mobile app, when most conversion happens on larger screens. So Google has been forced to play catch-up. Here’s the message from the Google Analytics header: Starting May 15, 2017, all properties using Remarketing with Google Analytics will be enhanced to take advantage of new cross-device functionality. This is an important update to your remarketing settings, which may relate to your privacy policy. The change was announced last September but has only just rolled out. So you can remarket to users on a different device to the one on which they visited your site when: You build a retargeting audience in Google Analytics You have opted in to remarketing tracking in Google Analytics Users are logged into Google on more than one device Users have allowed Google to link their web and app browsing history with their Google account Users have allowed Google account to personalise ads they see across the web This may seem like a hard-to-reach audience, but Google has two secret weapons: Gmail (used by over 1 billion people and 75% of those on mobile) and Chrome (now the default web browser for desktop, and growing in mobile). So there are many cases where Google knows which devices are linked to a user. What is not changing is how Google counts users in Google Analytics. Unless you are tracking registered users, a ‘user’ in Google Analytics will still refer to one device (tablet, mobile or laptop / desktop computer).   Could Google use their account information to make Google Analytics cross-device user tracking better? Yes, they could; but Google has always been careful to keep their own data about users (the actions users take on Google.com) separate from the data individual websites capture in Google Analytics (the actions users take on mywebsite.com). The former is owned by Google, and protected by a privacy agreement that exists between Google and the user, and the latter is owned by the website adding the tracking code but stored and processed by Google Analytics. Blurring those two would create a legal minefield for Google, which is why they stress the word ‘temporary’ in their explanation of cross-device audiences: In order to support this feature, Google Analytics will collect these users’ Google-authenticated identifiers, which are Google’s personal data, and temporarily join them to your Google Analytics data in order to populate your audiences.   How can I make use of the new cross-device retargeting? The first step is to create a remarketing audience from a segment of your website visitors that are already engaged. This could be users who have viewed a product, users who have viewed the pricing page or users who have viewed more than a certain number of pages. For more help on setting up the right goals to power the remarketing audience, please contact us.

2017-04-10
Try the top-rated Google Analytics app for Shopify stores

Try the top-rated Google Analytics app for Shopify stores

Get a 30-day free trial of Littledata for Google Analytics or Segment

Free Trial