Do I need the Google Analytics tracking code on every page?

The script that triggers/sends the tracking events to Google Analytics must be loaded once (and only once) on every page of your site. While you don't need a Google Analytics consultant or Google Analytics consulting group to help you set up tracking, you’ll usually need either your Analytics tracking ID or the entire Javascript tracking code snippet to complete the manual setup. This corresponds to your Google Analytics property. To find the tracking ID and code snippet: Sign in to your Google Analytics account. Select the Admin tab. Select an account from the drop-down menu in the ACCOUNT column. Select a property from the drop-down menu in the PROPERTY column. Under PROPERTY, click Tracking Info > Tracking Code. The snippet provided here must be implemented on every page, even the pages you're not interested in. If you chose to not include the code on every page then: You will not be able to see the full flow of a client on your website. You will have inaccurate data about the time spent on site and actions taken. Visits to untracked pages will appear as 'referrals' and so will skew the volume of sessions. Marketing campaigns to the untracked pages will be lost. The easy way for an established website to verify the tracking is complete is Google Analytics > Acquisition > Referrals and search in the report after the name of your website, as shown below. You can also use Littledata's audit tool (hint hint). [subscribe heading="Try Littledata free for 30 days" background_color="green" button_text="Start my free trial" button_link="https://www.littledata.io/app/get-free-trial"] Choose your method for tracking setup There are several ways to collect data in Google Analytics, depending on whether you want to track a website, an app or other internet-connected devices. To select the best installation method for what you wish to track, here is the complete guide from Google. Once you have successfully installed Google Analytics tracking, it may take up to 24 hours for data such as traffic referral information, user characteristics and browsing information to appear in your reports. Some of these metrics include buying behavior, average order value (AOV), customer lifetime value (LTV) and more. However, you can immediately check your web tracking code setup. If you don’t think it's working correctly, you can check your Real-Time reports or use Google Tag Assistant to verify your setup. Enhanced Ecommerce tracking The main benefit of enabling Enhanced Ecommerce tracking (EEC) over standard tracking is the number of valuable reports you have access to with EEC. Not only that, but you can segment data based on ecommerce events — i.e. which users visited your product pages, where the customer journey hit a roadblock (e.g. a customer pondered a product but didn’t add to cart, etc.) or which steps of the checkout process a user abandoned their cart. This kind of data helps you zoom in on your sales funnel and change the parts of the process that don’t lead to conversions. At Littledata, we typically set up EEC with Google Tag Manager. Here's how to set up Enhanced Ecommerce tracking via GTM. Setting up Shopify tracking [tip]If you haven't already, check out our free Shopify connection guide[/tip] If you're on Shopify and using Google Analytics as your main tracking tool, you're in luck. Our new tracking code update for Shopify users is faster, more versatile and more efficient than ever before. We also have new features and updates in our Shopify app for Google Analytics. With the app, you'll only see fixed, accurate data in Google Analytics. This means you won't need to rely on the broken data in Shopify analytics or the incomplete tracking in GA's default view. Fixed marketing attribution and accurate shopper behavior are now at your fingertips. That means better, more informed marketing & sales decisions for your Shopify store. 🚀

2019-05-04

Littledata's Shopify connection is now using gtag and GTM data layer

Littledata’s Shopify app is updating to use Google’s latest tracking code library. This will simplify your setup for Google Ads and speed up your site. Google’s ‘global site tag’ or gtag has been live for a year now and is stable for Littledata to adopt. In version 5 of our tracking script we now use gtag for all the events sent to Google Analytics. The advantages of gtag are: Integrates with Google Ads out of the box – no need for separate Google Ads conversion tracker Smaller Javascript library = faster page load times Future proof for using Google Optimize In addition, we are now using the standard 'data layer' format used by Google Tag Manager. This will make it easier for all you hackers to extend Littledata's tracking and use GTM with the enhanced ecommerce data layer, and easily create tags for marketing platforms like: Facebook, Criteo, etc. [subscribe] We've also moved to using the default ecommerce event naming recommended by Google. For example, the event category 'Ecommerce' is now 'ecommerce' (lower case) and event action 'Add to cart' is now 'add_to_cart' (snake case). If you have goals or reports based on the old event names you may need to update them. One final change is that we're only sending page views to GA when the page is not hidden in the browser. Certain advertising campaigns, including SnapChat ads, preload your webpages to provide a faster experience for users, but this skews your analytics with lots of low-grade visits who didn't actually 'see' your landing page. How to update the script If your store already has our tracking script installed, just click on the in-app notification to update. Not a Littledata user yet? If you're struggling with implementing Google Ads conversion tracking or GTM for a Shopify store, check out our Google Analytics connections for Shopify and Shopify Plus stores. Let our app fix your tracking, so you can get back to business!

2019-02-12

How to stop Google Tag Manager being hacked

In two high-profile data breaches this year – at Ticketmaster and British Airways – over half a million credit cards were stolen via a compromised script inserted on the payment pages. Update 8/7/19: British Airways was fined a record £183m over this data breach, under new GDPR regulation. They are contesting the fine. Google Tag Manager is a powerful tool which enables you to insert any script you want onto pages of your website, but that power can used against you by hackers if you're not careful – and below we’ll look at how to stop GTM being a security risk on your payment pages. Firstly, how did the hackers get the card details from these sites? And how is it relevant to GTM on your site? Security firm RiskIQ has traced the breach to a compromised Javascript file which skimmed the card details from the payment form. So when a user entered their credit card number and security code on BritishAirways.com (or their mobile app) those details were posted to a third party server, unknown to British Airways or the customer. This is a high-scale equivalent of placing a skimming devices on an ATM, which reads one card at a time. In Ticketmaster’s hack the script was one loaded from a chatbot vendor on their site, Inbenta. Inbenta claims not even to have been aware the script was used on payment pages. The changes to the script were subtle: not breaking any functionality, and in BA’s case using a domain ‘baway.com’ which looked somewhat authentic. To protect your site against a similar attack you obviously need to lock down accounts used by your developers to change scripts in the page source code, but you also need to secure GTM – which can be used to deploy such scripts. We have a few rules at Littledata to help reduce risks in using tag management on payment pages: 1. Use pixels over custom JavaScript tags on payment pages You probably need a few standard tags, such as Google Analytics, on payment pages but try to avoid any custom scripts which could possibly skim card details. Many non-standard tags use JavaScript only to create the URL of a tracking pixel – and it is much safer (and faster) to call the tracking pixel directly. Contact the vendor to find out how. (Littledata's Shopify app even removes the need to have any script on the payment pages, by hooking into the order as it's registered on Shopify's servers) 2. Avoid loading external JavaScript files in GTM Many vendors want you to load a file from their server (e.g. myvendor.com/tracking.js) from GTM, so they can update the tracking code whenever they want. This is flexible for them, but risky for you. If the vendor gets hacked (e.g. with Inbenta above) then you get compromised. It’s less risky to embed that script directly in GTM, and control version changes from there (although a fraction slower to load the page). Of particular risk is embedding a tag manager within a tag manager – where you are giving the third party rights to publish any other scripts within the one tag. Don’t do that! [subscribe] 3. Lock down Edit and Publish rights on GTM Your organisation probably has a high turnover of contract web developers and agencies, so have you checked that only the current staff or agencies have permission to edit and publish? It's OK to have external editors use 'workspaces' for version control in GTM, but ideally someone with direct accountability to your company should check and Publish. 4. Blacklist custom JavaScript tag on the payment pages You can set a blacklist from the on-page data layer to prevent certain types of tags being deployed on the payment pages. If you have a GTM container with many users, this may be more practical that step 3. 5. Remove tags from old vendors There are many thousands of marketing tools out there, and your company has probably tried a few. Do you remove all the tags from vendors when you stop working with them? These are most at risk of being hacked. At Littledata we run a quarterly process for marketing stakeholders opt-in tags they still need for tracking or optimisation. 6. Ensure all custom JavaScript tags are reviewed by a developer before publishing It can be hard to review minimised JavaScript libraries, but worth it for payment pages if you can’t follow rules 1 and 2. If you’re still worried, you can audit the actual network requests sent from payment pages. For example, in Chrome developer tools, in the 'Network' tab, you can inspect what requests sent out by the browser and to what servers. It’s easy for malicious code to hide in the patchwork of JavaScript that powers most modern web experiences, but what is harder to hide is the network requests made from the browser to external servers (i.e. to post the stolen card information out). This request to Google Analytics is fine, but if the domain of a request is dubious, look it up or ask around the team. Good luck, and keep safe with GTM!

2018-11-24

How to set up Enhanced Ecommerce tracking via Google Tag Manager

Enhanced Ecommerce (EEC) is a Google Analytics plug-in that provides merchants with better insights for the shopping behavior of users. Enhanced Ecommerce tracking requires your developers to send lots of extra product and checkout information in a way that Google Analytics can understand. So why use it? Why use Enhanced Ecommerce? The main benefit of EEC over standard ecommerce implementation is the sheer number of valuable reports merchants have access to with EEC. Not only that, but merchants can segment data based on ecommerce events — which users visited your product pages, where the customer journey hit a roadblock (e.g. a customer pondered a product but didn’t add it to cart, etc.) or which steps of the checkout process a user abandoned their cart. Ultimately, this kind of data helps merchants zoom in on their sales funnel and alter the parts of the process that don’t lead to conversion. [subscribe] Enchanced Ecommerce implementation is no small feat, but it also depends on a number of factors — the size of your store, the number and type of Google Analytics custom dimensions you need to add, etc. Without question, Google Tag Manager is the simplest and best way to enable Enhanced Ecommerce in Google Analytics. If you already use Google Tag Manager (GTM) to track page views, you must send ecommerce data via Google Tag Manager. If you don’t already use GTM, it’s simple to set up: just activate EEC within your Google Analytics tags and use a dataLayer as an ecommerce data source. Just make sure the dataLayer contains all ecommerce data. Step 1 Enable enhanced ecommerce reporting in the Google Analytics view admin setting, under ‘Ecommerce Settings’ Step 2 Select names for your checkout steps (see point 4 below): Step 3 Get your developers to push the product data behind the scenes to the page ‘dataLayer’. Here is the developer guide. Step 4 Make sure the following steps are tracked as a pageview or event, and for each step set up a Universal Analytics tracking tag:  Product listing view Product detail view  Add to cart event Remove from cart event Checkout step 1 (views the checkout page) Checkout step 2 etc – whatever registration, shipping or tax steps you have Purchase confirmation Refund Step 5 Send the data to Google Analytics using the Data Layer. Instruct the tags to look into the Data Layer and pull the key-value pairs from the eCommerce object pushed most recently into dataLayer by selecting the correct Google Analytics variable. Step 6 This step involves checking the setup. After you have configured everything in place, you'll need to check your entire. What you should be looking for is: Are all the keys configured in the dataLayer.push() getting picked up and being sent to Google Analytics? Is the payload length too long? Is there a risk of data duplication with some hits? To debug these, you really only need three tools: GTM's own Preview mode, the Google Analytics Debugger browser extension, and Google Chrome browser's DevTools. Yes, there are plenty of other tools you can use, but these have proven to be more than enough in my own experience. Wrapping up Need some more help? Get in touch with our lovely team of Google Analytics experts and we'd be happy to answer any questions! At Littledata, our Google Analytics connection is the easiest way for you to automate GA for ecommerce sites. With the connection, you also get: Smart audits to check for accurate tracking Seamless connections with apps like ReCharge and CartHook Benchmarks against over 12,000 ecommerce sites Raw data that remains available in Google Analytics Shopify tracking you can trust consistently You can also try our Google Analytics app for Shopify free for 30 days.

2018-11-10

6 reasons Facebook ads don’t match the data you see in Google Analytics

If you run Facebook Ads and want to see how they perform in Google Analytics, you may have noticed some big discrepancies between the data available in Facebook Ad Manager and GA. Both systems use different ways to track clicks and visitors, so let’s unpick where the differences are. There are two kinds of metrics you’ll be interested in: ‘website clicks’ = the number of Facebook users who clicked on an advert on your own site, and (if you do ecommerce) the transaction value which was attributed to that advert. Website Clicks vs Sessions from Facebook 1. GA isn’t picking up Facebook as the referrer If users click on a link in Facebook’s mobile app and your website opens in an in-app browser, the browser may not log that ‘facebook.com’ was the referrer. You can override this (and any other link) by setting the medium, source, campaign and content attributes in the link directly. e.g. www.mysite.com?utm_medium=social&utm_source=facebook.com&utm_campaign=ad Pro Tip: you can use GA’s URL builder to set the UTM tags on every Facebook campaign link for GA. In GA, under the Admin tag and then ‘Property settings’ you should also tick the box saying ‘Allow manual tagging (UTM values) to override auto-tagging (GCLID values)’ to make this work more reliably. 2. The user leaves the page before the GA tag fires There’s a time delay between a user clicking on the advert in Facebook and being directed to your site. On a mobile, this delay may be several seconds long, and during the delay, the user will think about going back to safety (Facebook’s app) or just closing the app entirely. This will happen more often if the visitor is not familiar with your brand, and also when the page contents are slow to load. By Facebook’s estimation the GA tracking won’t fire anywhere between 10% and 80% of clicks on a mobile, but fewer than 5% of clicks on a desktop. It depends on what stage in the page load the GA pixel is requested. If you use a tag manager, you can control this firing order – so try firing the tag as a top priority and when the tag container is first loaded. Pro Tip: you can also use Google's mobile site speed suggestions to improve mobile load speed, and reduce this post-click drop-off. 3. A Javascript bug is preventing GA receiving data from in-app browsers It’s possible your page has a specific problem that prevents the GA tag firing only for mobile Safari (or Android equivalent). You’ll need to get your developers to test out the landing pages specifically from Facebook’s app. Luckily Facebook Ad Manager has a good way to preview the adverts on your mobile. Facebook Revenue vs GA Ecommerce revenue 4. Attribution: post-click vs last non-direct click Currently, Facebook has two types of attribution: post-view and post-click. This means any sale the user makes after viewing the advert or clicking on the advert, within the attribution window (typically 28 days after clicking and 1 day after viewing), is attributed to that advert. GA, by contrast, can use a variety of attribution models, the default being last non-direct click. This means that if the user clicks on an advert and on the same device buys something within the attribution window (typically 30 days), it will be attributed to Facebook.  GA doesn't know about views of the advert. If another campaign brings the same user to your site between the Facebook ad engagement and the purchase, this other campaign takes the credit as the ‘last non-direct click’. So to match as closely as possible we recommend setting the attribution window to be '28 days after clicking the ad' and no 'after view' attribution in Facebook (see screenshot above) and then creating a custom attribution model in GA, with the lookback window at 28 days, and the attribution 'linear' The differences typically come when: a user engages with more than one Facebook campaign (e.g. a brand campaign and a re-targeting one) where the revenue will only be counted against the last campaign (with a priority for ads clicked vs viewed) a user clicks on a Facebook ad, but then clicks on another advert (maybe Adwords) before buying. Facebook doesn’t know about this 2nd advert, so will attribute all the revenue to the Facebook ad. GA knows better, and will attribute all (or part) of it to Adwords. 5. Facebook cross-device tracking The main advantage Facebook has over GA is that users log in to its platform across all of their devices, so it can stitch together the view of a mobile advert on day 1 with a purchase made from the user’s desktop computer on day 2. Here’s a fuller explanation. By contrast, unless that user logs into your website on both devices, and you have cross-device tracking setup, GA won’t attribute the sale to Facebook. 6. Date of click vs date of purchase In Facebook, revenue is attributed to the date the user saw the advert; in GA it is to the date of purchase. So if a user clicks on the advert on 1st September, and then buys on the 3rd September, this will appear on the 1st on Facebook – and on the 3rd in GA. 7. The sampling problem Finally, did you check if the GA report is sampled? In the top right of the screen, in the grey bar, you'll see that the report is based on a sample.  If that sample is less than 100% it means the numbers you see are estimates.  The smaller the sample size used, the larger the possibility of error.  So in this example, a 45% sample of 270,000 sessions could skew our results plus or minus 0.2% in the best case. As a rule of thumb, Google applies sampling when looking over more than 500,000 sessions (even if you select the 'greater precision' option from the drop-down menu). You can check your own sample using this confidence interval calculator. Conclusion Altogether, there’s a formidable list of reasons why the data will never be an exact match, but I hope it gives you a way to optimise the tracking. Please let us know if you’ve seen other tracking issues aside from these.   Get Social! Follow us on LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook and keep up-to-date with our Google Analytics insights.

2017-02-08

Cross Domain tracking for Eventbrite using Google Tag Manager (GTM)

Are you using Eventbrite for event registrations? And would you like to see the marketing campaign which drove that event registration correctly attributed in Google Analytics? Then you've come to right place! Here is a simple guide to adding a Google Tag Manager tag to ensure the correct data is sent to Eventbrite to enable cross-domain tracking with your own website. Many thanks to the Lunametrics blog for their detailed solution, which we have adapted here for GTM. Before this will work you need to have: links from your site to Eventbrite (including mysite.eventbrite.com or www.eventbrite.co.uk) the Universal Analytics tracking code on both your site and your Eventbrite pages. only have one GA tracking code on your own site - or else see the Lunametrics article to cope with this 1. Create a new tag in GTM Create a new custom HTML tag in GTM and paste this script: [code language="javascript"] <script> (function(document, window) { //Uses the first GA tracker registered, which is fine for 99.9% of users. //won't work for browsers older than IE8 if (!document.querySelector) return; var gaName = window.GoogleAnalyticsObject || "ga" ; // Safely instantiate our GA queue. window[gaName]=window[gaName]||function(){(window[gaName].q=window[gaName].q||[]).push(arguments)};window[gaName].l=+new Date; window[gaName](function() { // Defer to the back of the queue if no tracker is ready if (!ga.getAll().length) { window[gaName](bindUrls); } else bindUrls(); }); function bindUrls() { var urls = document.querySelectorAll("a"); var eventbrite = /eventbrite\./ var url, i; for (i = 0; i < urls.length; i++) { url = urls[i]; if (eventbrite.test(url.hostname) === true) { //only fetches clientID if this page has Eventbrite links var clientId = getClientId(); var parameter = "_eboga=" + clientId; // If we're in debug mode and can't find a client if (!clientId) { window.console && window.console.error("GTM Eventbrite Cross Domain: Unable to detect Client ID. Verify you are using Universal Analytics."); break; return; } url.search = url.search ? url.search + "&" + parameter : "?" + parameter; } } } function getClientId() { var trackers = window[gaName].getAll(); return trackers[0].get("clientId"); } })(document, window); </script> [/code]   2. Set the tag to fire 'DOM ready' Create a new trigger (if you don't have a suitable one) to fire the tag on every page at the DOM ready stage.  We need to make sure the Google Analytics tracker has loaded first. 3. Test the marketing attribution With the script working you should see pageviews of the Eventbrite pages as a continuation of the same session. You can test this by: Opening the 'real time' reporting tag in Google Analytics, on an unfiltered view Searching for your own site in Google Navigating to the page with the Eventbrite link and clicking on it Looking under the Traffic Sources report and checking you are still listed as organic search after viewing the Eventbrite page Need more help? Comment below or get in touch!   Get Social! Follow us on LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook and keep up-to-date with our Google Analytics insights.

2017-02-07

3 reasons you should be using Google Tag Manager for Shopify

Anyone running a Shopify store knows there are hundreds of Shopify apps, integrations and connections in the ecommerce world that can help you grow faster. But from Google Ads, DoubleClick, and Facebook Ads to custom plugins, many tools require you to insert scripts on the pages that need tagging, and for a lot of store owners, this can be a huge hassle without asking for developer help. Google Tag Manager (GTM) can launch new tags with just a few clicks. As the world's most popular enterprise-grade tag management solution, Google Tag Manager supports both Google and third-party tags. We've written quite a few articles on Google Tag Manager (including a full FAQ) and how to use it, but until now, we haven't dug deep into why you should use GTM. Here are 3 reasons why: 1. Reliable and accurate ecommerce data When your tags aren’t working properly, they can hurt your site performance, resulting in slow load times, website unavailability, or a loss of functionality. That’s why it’s critical to have a tag management solution in place that allows you to quickly determine the status of your tags. Easy-to-use error checking and speedy tag loading in Google Tag Manager means you know for certain that every tag works. You can rest assured knowing your mission-critical data is being collected reliably and accurately! Your IT team will also feel confident that the site is running smoothly, so everyone's happy, even during busy holidays or the launch of a new campaign. Large brands have implemented GTM to launch their tags exactly for this reason: reliable and accurate ecommerce data. PizzaHut, Made.com, AgeUK and many other brands running on Shopify use GTM to manage their tags for Google and third-party platforms. Setting up Enhanced Ecommerce via GTM In Google Analytics, the main benefit of using Enhanced Ecommerce tracking (EEC) over standard ecommerce implementation is the amount of valuable reports you have access to as a merchant with EEC. But that's not all—you can also segment data based on ecommerce events, such as: Which users visited your product pages Where your shoppers hit a roadblock in the customer journey (e.g. a shopper viewed a product but never added to cart) Which step of the checkout process a shopper abandoned cart This kind of data helps you zoom in on your sales funnel and update the parts of the process that either stall conversions or slow down the path to purchase. Enchanced Ecommerce implementation is no walk in the park, but it does depend on a few things: How large is your store? How many Google Analytics custom dimensions do you need to add? What type of custom dimensions? etc. Without question, Google Tag Manager is the easiest way to enable Enhanced Ecommerce in Google Analytics — and we can help with that! Do you already use GTM? If you already use GTM to track page views, you must send ecommerce data via Google Tag Manager. If you don't already use GTM...It’s a simple setup: activate EEC within your Google Analytics tags and use a dataLayer as an ecommerce data source. Just make sure the dataLayer contains all ecommerce data! 2. Quickly deploy Google and third-party tags With so many tracking tools out there, marketers need flexibility—whether that’s changing tags on the fly or having the ability to easily add tags from other sources. In GTM, marketers can add or change their own tags as needed. Google Tag Manager supports all tags and has easy-to-use templates for a wide range of Google and third-party tags for web and mobile apps. Don’t see a tag listed? You can add it immediately as a custom tag. With this much flexibility, your campaign can be underway with just a few clicks. Even if you are using Google Ads (Adwords), Adroll, Facebook, Hotjar, Criteo or your own script, you can implement it with Google Tag Manager. Even if you're a publisher as, let's say, nationalgeographic-magazine.com, sell furniture at Made.com, sell event tickets as eventbrite.com or organise courses as redcrossfirstaidtraining.co.uk, GTM is the best way to organise all the scripts your partners provides. 3. Collaborate across the enterprise and make tag updates efficiently Collaboration across a large team can be a challenge. Not having the proper tools can stall workflows, which decreases productivity and efficiency. Workspaces and granular access controls allow your team to work together efficiently within Google Tag Manager: Multiple users can complete tagging updates at the same time and publish changes as they’re ready Multi-environment testing lets you publish to different environments to ensure things are working as expected I don't know about you, but every time I need to add a new script on my website, I hesitate out of fear my website will break and I wouldn't know how to fix it. I wanted a solution where I could add a script on my own, test it and then publish it without any developer help. And then I found Google Tag Manager. GTM lets you collaborate and work independently, at the same time, on the same website. You can publish a tag at the same time your teammate is creating an A/B testing experiment, all in the same GTM container. Adding Google Tag Manager to Shopify will help increase the value of your store and the accuracy of your Shopify tracking. GTM is free, it's reliable, and you can find plenty of how-tos on online so you can start using it right away. Google Tag Manager currently provides out-of-the-box integrations with: Google Analytics AdWords Conversion Tracking AdWords Remarketing (aka Google Ads, which we integrate with for accurate marketing attribution) DoubleClick Google Optimize (which we have a connection for!) Google Surveys Website Satisfaction - Google Surveys AdRoll Crazy Egg Hotjar LinkedIn Yieldify and more This out-of-the-box integration doesn't require any special knowledge. And, for any other script that you might have, we can walk you through the process of integrating Google Tag Manager and Shopify. Questions about GTM? Get in touch with our team of Shopify experts and Google Analytics consultants!   Quick links Building funnels and triggering other marketing tags in GTM How to set up Enhanced Ecommerce tracking via GTM Google Tag Manager FAQ Connecting your Google Analytics store for accurate Shopify tracking

2016-12-13

New interface and workspaces in Google Tag Manager

Google Tag Manager has recently had quite a revamp to its interface. Not to mention the addition of much talked about workspaces feature. Google Tag Manager (GTM) is a great tool that saves the development and implementation time, and the new drastic changes in any of Google’s tools can be quite a shock when you’re used to one way of workflow. The latest changes to the interface are radical but as with everything else, it just takes a short while to get used to. GTM still works the same, though. There’s no change to how your tags, triggers and variables are set up. So let’s see what's changed! Overlays on top of overlays This is the biggest change in the interface! Whether you’re creating a new tag or changing an existing one, you’ll be making your updates in overlays that slide in from the right hand side of the screen. Whilst this may be confusing initially, this is a great improvement on the previous workflow. Before you had to create your variables before the tag, or if creating the tag, save the progress, then create the variable separately, and then return to the tag to add in your variable. Too many steps! The new overlay doesn’t cover the whole screen and instead, leaves a bit of space on the left so you can see where you started from. Now that I’ve embraced the workspaces, I’ve realised how great it is to be able to do changes and updates without navigating elsewhere. Icons replace colours Previously, when viewing a list of tags all the triggers were colour coded so you could quickly see types of triggers used. Now, they’re all grey with icons at the beginning. I’ve previously found the colour coding very handy in quickly determining where the tags have been set to work. I’m not convinced that the icons will do as great of a job, but like with all of the changes – just embrace them and move on. List of variables They’ve lost the ‘enabled built-in variables’ section at the top. It used to have checkboxes so you could quickly enable or disable select variables. Now you have a list of built-in variables and for any changes, you have to click ‘configure’ button and then select which ones you want or not. And of course, you’ll have to do these changes in the overlay that slides over. The variables you've created previously will be in a separate list when you scroll down the page. If you want to view the details of the variable, then you’ll have to click on the variable and see its setup in the new overlay. Remember, remember… Do you tend to forget to specify your container's name and description? Now you get reminded to do so when you click to ‘publish’ your container and haven’t set the details. Timestamps I love it when a small change can make a big difference! This is that kind of change. When hovering over any relative timestamps in the triggers, overview or other sections, you will see the exact date and time of the latest change. What are workspaces? Workspaces are multiple containers that teams and users can work on without worrying about publishing someone else’s updates that may not be ready to go live. For someone working within a number of teams, like we do, this is a very welcomed update. After using it for a few weeks, I’ve already seen improvements in the speed of publishing updates. Now, fewer people have been blocked from progressing on their tags, which is really great! So now you can make your additions or amendments in a separate space and publish them when they're ready. What really happens when you publish is that anything new in your workspace gets added to the default workspace. This may include any updates to tags, triggers, variables, and any notes you may have added. If you can, stick to making smaller sets of changes within workspaces so you have a more robust version history, allowing you to trace updates and roll back to previous versions more quickly. You’ll get 3 workspaces in total so 1 default one + 2 custom workspaces, whilst 360 accounts get unlimited workspaces. Here’s how they work. To create a separate workspace click on the ‘Default Workspace’ in the left panel. In the new overlay click on the + icon in the top right corner. Now enter the name and description for the workspace so when you choose a workspace you can quickly see what's being worked on in there, or what the purpose of the workspace is. You can always refer to these for information on what was worked on or published as part of this workspace. A new workspace will always be created based on the latest GTM version and include the latest tags, triggers, and variables. If you're publishing a workspace that has conflicting updates with another workspace, then GTM will let you know and give you the option to resolve conflicts in their very easy to use conflict resolution tool. Once you publish the non-default workspace, it will be automatically removed. Better tag management You know how GTM has a number of tag templates for the most typical tracking needs, for example, AdWords and DoubleClick. These templates are very useful for creating and maintaining tags without codes, allowing to insert only required data, and making the whole process less error-prone. Well, they've expanded their selection with additional templates from vendors such as Bing, Twitter, Hotjar, Nielsen, Yieldify and many many more. I've been setting up a number of tags from the new vendors so I'm glad to see they've finally caught up with this. Here's a full list of supported tags is available in Tag Manager's Help section.   So these are some of the most notable changes. My favourite ones are overlays, timestamps and workspaces for reasons I mentioned above. The overlays don't seem to have got much love when they were first launched, but it's definitely a step up on the previous workflow. Got strong feelings about any of the latest updates? Let me know what you love or hate in the comments below.   Get Social! Follow us on LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook and keep up-to-date with our Google Analytics insights.   Image credit: screenshot of 'conflict resolution tool' courtesy of Google Analytics Blog

2016-10-13
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