6 FAQs you may have asked during a Littledata demo

Like many SaaS companies (and Shopify app developers), we get a LOT of merchants writing in with questions. Big, small, new, old, Shopify Plus, Shopify basic, headless Shopify, platform migrations from Magento...you name it. But some questions stand out for every Shopify store. For those of you who've gone through a demo with our support or sales team, it is highly likely that you asked one of the following questions about Littledata, Shopify and Google Analytics (GA): When's the right time to install Littledata? Do you fix marketing attribution? Should we use Segment? Why doesn't my Shopify data match what I see in GA? How do you capture complete revenue data? What's included in enterprise plans? And there's a reason why — these are the questions we get the most from merchants like you. In this post, we'll break down the answers as clearly and directly as possible. Plus, we'll give you the resources you need for more detailed answers. (Rather talk directly to a human? Book a demo). [subscribe] 1) When's the right time to install Littledata? In short, it really depends on your internal process. What do we mean by process? Let's put like this: why do you need accurate data? What will you do with it? If you're still working on your checkout architecture, it's probably not the right time. If you generally don't trust data to help make decisions about CRO, marketing plans, online product merchandising, retargeting, etc., then it's definitely not the right time (nor a good fit in general). But if you just don't trust your Shopify data in Google Analytics and want to trust it, then it definitely IS time. And if you're still shopping around for Shopify Plus development agencies, it's probably not the right time (though we can help recommend one). But in most cases, the time is NOW! Every ecommerce site and DTC brand has their own internal process for moving toward data-driven decision making, and whether you're ju or already en route to scale insanely fast, we're here to help. But don't take it from us. Here are some of the cases where clients have said they were really glad they started a free trial of Littledata then and didn't wait to fix their tracking: Migrating from another ecommerce platform (most often Magento) to Shopify Ramping up paid spend and want to make sure the data is accurate (most often Facebook Ads and Instagram Ads) Recently redesigned the site or checkout -- or added products by subscription -- and want to ensure complete sales data and better segmentation in Google Analytics Recently launched multi-currency (multiple "stores" in Shopify-speak) and looking for a way to segment marketing campaigns and track sales in Google Analytics And one of my favorites: "We were actually already loving Littledata but upgraded for analytics training and extra support!" [tip]Testing your new setup in a dev store or production site before moving to a live site? Let us know and we'll set up a free test account[/tip] 2) Do you fix marketing attribution? Yes. Littledata is uniquely suited to stores that really care about getting their data right, and that's especially true if you want accurate marketing attribution. Our app fixes attribution for Shopify stores automatically with a combination of server-side and client-side tracking. We stitch sessions together to make sure nothing's lost, so you can rely on Google Analytics or Segment (our current data destinations) as the single source of truth for both pre-click and post-click data, as well as more complex stuff like segmented remarketing, comparative attribution models and LTV calculations for subscription ecommerce. Our script uses gtag and GTM data layer, and can easily supplement and improve your GTM setup (though many clients find that they no longer need GTM). So if you're asking questions like "Why is an absurd amount of my traffic showing as Direct?" or "Is it possible to see the LTV by channel for our Shopify store?", we've got you covered. As our CEO puts it, "What's the real ROI on your Facebook Ads?" [tip]Get accurate campaign tracking and know your true ROAS with our connections for Facebook Ads and Google Ads[/tip] As an added bonus, we have ecommerce benchmarks in the app. So once you have accurate data, you can see if your Facebook referrals are higher or lower than average, as well as if there are technical factors such as page load speed affecting conversions. 3) Should we use Segment? If you're considering different data pipeline and customer data solution, we highly recommend Segment. It's a powerful, clean way to track customer data alongside anonymous browsing behavior, ad performance and more. In fact, we love Segment so much that we built the only recommended Segment connection for Shopify stores. Here's what one customer has to say about it: "This app seamlessly integrated Shopify with Segment. All of our data is flowing seamlessly from Shopify into all of our destinations via Segment." If you're comparing Segment against other CDPs like mParticle and Stitch, we're happy to chat about the pros and cons and give you an honest opinion about what's best for your ecommerce business. One thing our larger Segment users find particularly useful about Segment is that once a source is set up, it tends to run really smoothly. So Segment becomes a single source of truth in a way that few other data platforms can offer, with literally hundreds of destinations for using, acting on and modeling that data. 4) Why doesn't my Shopify data match what I see in Google Analytics? [tip]There's a free resource for that! Learn how to fix Shopify <> GA data differences in our free ebook[/tip] The truth is that Google Analytics (GA) and Shopify need a little help to play nice. Most marketers use GA to track performance, but having a good data setup — even for bare essentials like transactions and revenue — is harder than it looks. In some cases, you may need the help of a Google Analytics consultant or GA expert. For other stores (especially teams well-versed in GA tracking) don't need the help of an expert. There are many reasons for differences in tracking results, but let’s take a look at the top 6 reasons. a) Orders are never recorded in Google Analytics Usually, this happens because your customer never sees the order confirmation page. More commonly, this is caused by payment gateways not sending users back to the order "thank you" page. b) The Analytics / Google Tag Manager integration contains errors Shopify's integration with Google Analytics is a pretty basic one, tracking just a few of all the possible ecommerce events and micro-moments required for a complete picture. Although Shopify’s integration is designed to work for most standard stores, there are those who build a more personalised theme. In this case, they would require a custom integration with Google Analytics. But with Littledata's Shopify app, here's what you can track. c) A script in the page prevents tracking to work on your order thank you page Many websites have various dynamics on the thank you page in order to improve user experience and increase retention. But these scripts can sometimes fail and create a domino effect, preventing other modules from executing. d) Too many products included in one transaction Every time a page on your website loads, Google Analytics sends a hit-payload to its servers which contains by default a lot of user data starting from source, path, keywords etc. combined with the data for viewed or purchased products (name, brand, category, etc). This data query can grow quite long if the user adds products with long names and descriptions. But there is a size limit for each hit-payload of 8kb, which can include information for about 20 products. When this limit is reached, GA will not send the payload to its servers, resulting in lost purchase data. e) Too many interactions have been tracked in one session This inconsistency is not encountered as often, but it needs to be taken into account when setting up Google Analytics tracking. One of GA's limitations for standard tracking is that a session can contain only 500 hits. This means that interactions taking place after the hit limit is reached will be missed by Google Analytics. 5) How do you capture complete revenue data? It's magic. Or at least it might feel that way. Once you put our tracking script in your theme and install the relevant connections, Littledata uses a savvy combination of client-side and server-side tracking to capture every shopper interaction with your online store. Because our server-side tracking sends revenue data with purchase and refund events directly to your chosen data destination (Google Analytics or Segment), it's much more reliable than waiting for an event to fire when a confirmation page loads completely, or trying to hack together a way to capture revenue data with GTM from third-party checkouts. Our app often fixes revenue variance of 20-30%, even for large retailers! Behind the scenes the setup looks something like this: Not only does Littledata capture complete sales data, including refunds, but our Shopify integration also sets up custom dimensions in your Google Analytics account for smarter segmentation and long-term tracking. After all, smart ecommerce businesses know that revenue isn't just about the first purchase numbers -- you need to track what types of customers purchase more over time. For example, do customers who come from a particular marketing channel tend to make a number of smaller purchases that actually add up to higher lifetime revenue than those one-off big spenders? So we add custom dimensions including: Lifetime value (LTV) Last order date Shopify customer ID If you're using ReCharge for subscriptions, note that we also track subscription lifecycle events such as payment method updates and subscription updates, so you can do deep dives into not just revenue changes but the reasons for those changes. [tip]Do you really know which marketing channels bring you profitable customers? Learn from our CEO how to accurately calculate lifetime value[/tip] 6) What's included in Enterprise plans? At Littledata, we've been lucky to have a chance to scale along with Shopify. Larger brands have been increasingly drawn to the platform's ease of use, and Shopify Plus merchants now include Leesa, Bulletproof Coffee, LeSportsac and Gymshark. But even with Shopify's growth, there's a consistent problem: questionable analytics. One thing I really love about working at Littledata is that we’ve managed to keep the core tracking tools extremely affordable, while also offering a wider range of enterprise plans at approximately 1/10 the cost of hiring outside consultants or someone in-house. We have a range of options for enterprise plans to fit your needs and budget, grouped around two enterprise "tiers": enterprise basic and enterprise plus. Basic enterprise Basic enterprise plans can be paid monthly or annually. They include: Dedicated account manager Shopify Plus support Unlimited connections Unlimited country stores Every account manager at Littledata is an analytics expert. They can help to ensure accurate setup of your Segment or Google Analytics tracking, and recommend proven implementation and optimization strategies for Shopify Plus. After all, once you know that you can trust your data, focusing on the right metrics can make a world of difference. Enterprise Plus Enterprise Plus plans include everything in basic Enterprise plans, such as support from an analytics expert, plus custom setup and training to fit your needs. Options include: Custom setup Analytics training Manual data audits Segment support, including solutions engineering Google Tag Manager support Analytics 360 Suite support And a whole lot more. See what’s included in our enterprise analytics plans. In short, we’re here to make sure that you can trust your data — and use that data for actionable results. If you’d like to get started with the app, you can try it free for 30 days. We're also happy to walk you through the app — just book a demo with us online!

by Ari
2020-03-27

Why remote work is more productive

The fast-spreading coronavirus is the last reason we want to be hyping up remote work. But alas, here we are. 2020 was deemed “the year of remote work" by LinkedIn leaders. More companies than ever were projected to make true strides in shifting to a more flexible, sustainable remote work model. As companies turn to remote work as a potential solution to minimize the spread of COVID-19, there are some other, very real concerns: According to Workplaceless, only 30% of business leaders feel their company is well prepared for the increase of remote work Less than 10% of employees strongly agree that their leaders have the skills needed to thrive in the digital economy Before the virus began spreading, 38% of remote workers received zero training on tips and strategies for effective remote work Tammy Bjelland, CEO of Workplaceless, even expressed concern about both employees and employers being extremely ill-prepared for this abrupt work culture shift: While remote work is a valid strategy to maintain business continuity in times of crisis like the outbreak of COVID-19, suddenly allowing remote work with no clear policy or processes in place will not have the same positive outcomes as investing adequate resources into preparing leaders and employees for success in a remote environment. And these are fair concerns. With the current public health crisis, a huge chunk of the workforce is starting to experience remote work for the first time. And the patterns don't lie: Employees generally enjoy it. But many larger companies are typically reluctant to change, especially to such a fundamental reshaping of the workplace.  In spite of all of the bad consequences of the recent virus outbreak, remote work might be the best thing to come out of all of this. It might finally bring this work revolution to the mainstream, after years of slowly brewing only within small teams or freelancers. At Littledata, we have a fully distributed team in four different countries and six different cities. Here are some benefits of our global remote culture: 1. Shorter commute time Most remote workers do their work either at home or at co-working spaces or cafes (and the same is true of our team). These are usually closer to home. Compared to my last workplace, I now save 40 minutes every day when I go into our co-working space, or 70 minutes when I work from home. That might not seem like much, but 70 minutes saved every work day comes out to 24 hours saved per month (3 full work days). That wasted energy can be put to better use by focusing it on daily work tasks. 2. Less distractions An office is usually a loud place, and even more so in an open-space layout. Although I like talking to colleagues (even though I'm more of an introvert), it can be unproductive. It can take up to 23 minutes to return to the original task after an interruption.  Most of the time, I only keep the essentials with me (laptop, charger and headphones). I don’t have to water any plants, I don’t have to rearrange my cat photos on my desk, I don’t even have a fixed desk to be emotionally attached to. :)  My co-working space is specifically tailored to tech companies. So even when I do get distracted, the talks are mainly about new technologies, which could actually help solve some bugs at work.  Every few days, we have tech meetups organized as well. 3. Everyone arrives in meetings on time This may seem counter-intuitive, but it's true; when the calendar alerts you of a meeting, everyone is usually on the conference call within a minute or two.  Every teammate is very focused on the tasks at hand, so not much useless talk occurs. Sure, the connection might drop for someone, or someone might mute their microphone by mistake, but these things get better over time. Plus, getting everyone on the same page is easier by sharing your screen — not cramming the whole team into a conference room. 4. Mutual trust and empathy At the heart of every successful remote team is trust. Sounds almost too simple, right? It’s not. When employers trust their people and the people trust their employer, good things tend to happen. Companies tend to grow, cultures tend to strengthen, and productivity tends to spike. And this isn’t unique to remote work. It’s at the core of good leadership for any organization — government, schools, non-profits, sports teams, etc. Remote work as a result of COVID-19 isn’t a tropical vacation — it’s a stressful time, especially for workers living in urban areas. Your team leaders should empower you (and trust you) to do your best work, even during this coronavirus outbreak. We certainly feel this kind of trust and empathy from our leaders at Littledata! 5. Bonus: benefits for companies As companies embrace remote work, they often realize that there are more benefits than overhead cost-cutting: Recruiting: when you make your operations remote, you have a much larger talent pool to choose from. Global support teams: you probably provide some sort of support to your customers or partners, either by phone, email or live chat. Having support teams around the world helps your team cover any timezone, and faster response times means happier customers. Of course, working remotely is not for everyone. Reduced oversight and in-person communication can reduce productivity. However, at Littledata, we believe the opposite is often true: working remotely can not only increase productivity, but can also boon creativity, critical thinking and lead to happier employees. During this coronavirus outbreak, companies are trying to figure it out. But one thing's for sure; for many people, remote work is more productive — whether or not we're social distancing. [note]We're hiring at Littledata! Check out our job openings[/note]

by Nico
2020-03-17

Littledata Shopify app featured on Shopify Dropify podcast

We're at it again with another podcast episode! Following last year's appearences on Honest Ecommerce and Ecommerce Fastlane, we joined our friends at The Cut this time around. A few months ago, our team traveled to LA for #ChargeX, a conference for Shopify subscription businesses and agencies, hosted by our partners at ReCharge. [note]Check out our CEO's ReCharge talk on calculating LTV with accuracy[/note] Before heading to California, I joined The Shopify Dropify podcast, hosted by The Cut, a group of Shopify Experts and a creative agency based in Perth, Australia. Check out the 30 min podcast below. If you have questions about how how we can help your store get accurate data, be sure to get in touch with support or our team of Google Analytics experts. Main points How our Shopify app helps merchants measure the core metrics for your business, such as average order value (AOV), customer lifetime value (LTV), etc. The most common mistakes we see Shopify stores make Why it's vital to have complete, accurate tracking at each step of the buying funnel Differentiating first-time purchases from recurring purchases via our revamped ReCharge connection for subscription Shopify businesses How merchants using our Shopify ReCharge connection have been able to predict their subscription sales performance Where many Littledata customers find themselves in the path to scale The questions we get most often Why doesn't my Shopify data match what's in Google Analytics (or what's in my bank account)? How can I get advanced analytics support? The unique challenges we think ecommerce businesses face the most How ecommerce is (ironically) driving the re-opening of physical storefronts Data trends for Shopify stores (e.g. POS systems, pop-ups, new data touch points, etc.) The one thing we suggest merchants do right now to improve your store [tip]Try our Google Analytics app for Shopify free for 30 days[/tip]

by Ari
2020-02-20

Track subscription lifecycle events with ReCharge v2

It's time to supercharge your subscription analytics! We're excited to announce that the most advanced analytics integration for ReCharge stores just got even better. With version 2.0 of Littledata's ReCharge connection, you can easily track subscription lifecycle events and attribute them back to the original source. The enhanced integration is now in public beta, so if you're a current user you can upgrade in the app. New users (get an unrestricted free trial here) will automatically start with ReCharge v2. Here's a quick guide to what's new and why it matters for your ecommerce business. What can you track? ReCharge has always been one of Littledata's most popular connections for ecommerce analytics. The new version of our ReCharge connection captures subscription lifecycle events for even more detailed tracking and attribution. What's new Track subscription lifecycle events, including subscription updates and cancellations Get accurate marketing attribution for subscription lifecycle events Include subscription lifecycle events in LTV calculations Automatically track the following subscription lifecycle events Subscription Created Subscription Cancelled Subscription Updated Order Processed Customer Updated Charge Failed Payment Method Updated Max Retries Reached [note]See everything you can track with v2, and how the events are named for Segment and Google Analytics.[/note] Of course, all the advanced ReCharge tracking in 1.0 is still there too, including LTV tracking and a separate view for recurring purchases. We've simply expanded the functionality to capture even more data points! Where can you see the data? Data is everywhere. But at Littledata, we believe you should have full ownership of your own ecommerce data. Unlike reporting tools that focus on external data storage or sexy interfaces, our app actually audits your setup, fixes your tracking, and leaves the data where it should be: with you. So where can you see the subscription analytics from our enhanced ReCharge data? ReCharge v2 is an advanced analytics connection for Shopify and Shopify Plus stores using ReCharge to sell products by subscription Littledata uses a combination of server-side tracking and web-based tracking to capture the events and original customer source, then sends that data to Google Analytics or Segment If you're using our Google Analytics app for Shopify, you can see the data directly in Google Analytics (GA) or Google Tag Manager (GTM), or your favorite reporting tool that works with GA data, such as Google Data Studio If you're using our Segment app for Shopify, you can send the data to hundreds of Segment destinations for analysis or remarketing  Benefits .The number one question that drives new users to Littledata is this: why doesn't Google Analytics data match what I see in Shopify? So from Standard and PRO plans to enterprise plans, the number one benefit our customers find with any Littledata connection is still accurate data.  The benefits of our ReCharge connection have always covered three core areas: Accurate sales data, broken down by first-time and recurring payments Better marketing attribution Custom dimensions for customer lifetime value (LTV) calculations Industry benchmarks to help you take data-driven action With v2 of our ReCharge connection, all of those benefits have become even more powerful. For example, with v2, you can now: See how a particular Facebook campaign contributes to subscriptions to a particular product group over time Dive deeper into the data to see if that campaign is acquiring customers who then update their subscriptions in a particular way 6 months later. But don't take my word for it. Check out some of the successful Shopify and ReCharge merchants using a data-driven approach to scale the smart way. As I mentioned earlier, ReCharge v2 is now the default ReCharge connection for new users. If you're a current Littledata customer, just login to your account and you'll be prompted to upgrade to the latest version of the connection. As always, let us know if you have any questions. Let's make 2020 the year that independent DTC subscription brands give Amazon a run for its money!

by Ari
2020-01-22

Optimizing Littledata's enterprise plans for Shopify Plus

Here at Littledata we've been lucky to have a chance to scale along with Shopify. Larger brands have been increasingly drawn to the platform's ease of use, and Shopify Plus merchants now include Leesa, Bulletproof Coffee, LeSportsac and Gymshark. The most successful Shopify Plus stores are using Google Analytics as the single source of truth, so we've built out connections to solve their Shopify analytics issues with tremendous attention to detail. But when it comes to extra support, there's a lot more involved. Since launching our first Shopify app in 2017, we've grown both our feature set and our enterprise plans to make it easy for Plus stores to make data-driven decisions around online sales and marketing, from major marketing channels like Facebook Ads to product mixes, custom checkout flows and multi-currency payment options. The path hasn't been short or straight. Here's how it all started, and where we are now. Shopify's growth Shopify is growing fast with no signs of slowing down (the stock price might level off, but growth remains strong). This year, significantly, Shopify's market cap surpassed eBay's and, as we noted at Shopify Unite, the annual developer conference in Toronto, the company will be pumping over a billion dollars into developing their own fulfillment network to help SMBs take aim at Amazon. It's not that Shopify is the only solution out there. There actually are viable competitors for DTC brands in certain niches -- BigCommerce, Spree Commerce, and Magento come to mind -- but I'll save those thoughts for a longer article on the state ecommerce platforms globally, including 'headless' APIs and open source solutions. As Shopify Plus has become the most recognized solution, larger brands are realizing that plug-and-play doesn't mean too-many-limitations, or at least that those limitations are changing. Larger brands -- especially when managed by ecommerce veterans who've had to maintain, not just build, an ecommerce solution by hand in the past -- are seeing the inherent limitations to the slickest UI and building blocks on the market, as a blessing not a curse. Shopify Plus now clearly excels at: Usability. Shopify Plus makes it easy for merchants to create slick, responsive sites. It's been that way from the beginning, but as the capabilities have expanded, that usability has become a key value prop for larger brands. Multi-currency sales tools. It's now easy to sell in multiple currencies with multiple 'stores' or Shopify Plus instances. Selling in US dollars but want to launch a new brand experience in France or Japan? Shopify Plus makes this relatively painless with Shopify Pay. Everything Instagram. While larger brands rely on a variety of social networks for sales and marketing, Instagram has quickly risen to the top. Shopify has made it easy to integrate Instagram into your shopping experience and make any Instagram post or story a shopping experience. Customizable without being easily breakable. Thanks to Shopify Scripts, available only to Plus stores, and (an increasing number of) ecommerce APIs, Shopify Plus is now an excellent option for customization that doesn't require a team of developers to build or maintain.  A vibrant app ecosystem. The Shopify app store is an industry-leading approach to solutions built in response to real merchant needs. This allows for a thriving community around what Paul Rogers calls the 'app' approach, where the core of the platform is "managed" by Shopify and set in stone, so you can build flexible customer experiences on top of it. Automation. With Shopify Flow connectors, it's easy to build automations (when this happens, trigger this other thing). Name recognition. Let's face it. Name recognition is something that's often overlooked in industry analysis about the growth and churn for ecommerce platforms, but it's no small feat. Top agencies are finding that even if they try to recommend a different platform to a merchant, it can be an uphill battle. But there's also a consistent problem: questionable analytics. Shopify Plus stores often find out even after a much faster launch process than they might have found with a different platform, and a seamless design experience, their Shopify data doesn't match Google Analytics. That's where Littledata comes in. How we've adapted Are Plus stores really that different from 'regular' Shopify stores? Well, yes and no. The needs for ecommerce growth hacking -- using analytics to make data-driven decisions to scale an ecommerce site consistently -- are remarkably similar for both Shopify and Shopify Plus stores, and the core tracking issues are the same for any store with a Shopify checkout , whether you're doing 100 orders per month or 10,000+. The difference often comes from more subtle issues with Google Tag Manager implementation, or custom setup and reporting, like the need for a comparative attribution model or lifetime value reporting segmented in a way specific to your landing pages, product groups or checkout flow. To fit the needs of Shopify Plus stores we have honed our main analytics connectors and tested and improved them for ease-of-use and scalability. Here are some of the enhancements specific to Plus stores: Server-side tracking for Shopify. Complete sales tracking, including checkout steps and refunds, is the core of our business and we've continued to improve this for Plus stores, whether you're sending the ecommerce data directly to Google Analytics, or to Segment first. We're here to help you track every checkout step and marketing channel, no matter how custom your setup. Smart connections. The success of our app with Plus merchants has led to a wide range of improvements to additional connections, such as plug-and-play tracking for custom checkouts with our ReCharge and CartHook connections, and ensuring that the Facebook-Ads-to-Google-Analytics connection works for Instagram Ads too! Lifetime value (CLV/LTV) reporting. Customer lifetime value reporting is essential, but it's hard to do manually. So we now automatically include custom dimensions for calculating lifetime value in Google Analytics. Data ownership. After testing a reporting dashboard in the app, we found that Plus stores wanted more direct data ownership. So now you own the data completely, in Segment or Google Analytics. On an enterprise plan, we can help create custom reporting specific to your business in tools like Data Studio and Tableau, or even directly in Google Analytics. Segment.com integration. Segment is increasingly used by Plus stores. So over this past year, we worked with Segment to launch their only officially recommended Shopify connector. You can now use Shopify as a Segment source and get consistent, reliable data. Google Tag Manager. Our script now uses gtag and is easy to customize for any GTM setup. On enterprise plans, Littledata customers are able to get help with planning, testing, implementing a custom Tag Manager setup, plus optimizing site design and online marketing using that data. Multi-currency tracking. We offer multi-currency tracking for all of the payment gateways we support. If you're using Google Analytics, you can also use Littledata to segment all of your orders (and customer behavior before purchase) by payment gateway. Subscription ecommerce. The subscription ecommerce market continues to grow rapidly, now totalling more than $12 billion in the US alone. We've honed our ReCharge and Bold integrations to offer Shopify Plus stores advanced tracking for subscription sales, automatically. Expert support. We now offer enterprise plans to fit any DTC brand budget, so you don't have to be lost in the dark about analytics. One thing I really love about Littledata is how we've managed to keep the core tracking tools extremely affordable, while also offering a wider range of enterprise plans at approximately 1/10 the cost of hiring outside consultants or someone in-house. How do we do it? With the power of our own tech, plus a top-rated team in terms of both customer happiness and analytics expertise. Enterprise plans What's included in enterprise plans today for merchants that want additional support? Here's how they break down. Littledata Enterprise We've always offered some form of support on enterprise plans, but early on we struggled as an organization to figure out how best to use that support time with our merchants. Now we have it down to both an art and a science. Especially popular with Shopify Plus stores that have started to get some brand recognition, such as Rachel Zoe's Box of Style subscription box, Craft Gin Club in the UK, and Dave Asprey's coffee lifestyle brand Bulletproof, Littledata's enterprise plans give you data when you need it and support when you want it. Basic enterprise plans can be paid monthly or annually. They include: Dedicated account manager Shopify Plus support Unlimited connections Unlimited data thresholds Unlimited country stores Every account manager at Littledata is an analytics expert. They can help to ensure accurate setup of your Segment or Google Analytics tracking, and recommend proven implementation and optimization strategies for Shopify Plus. After all, once you know that you can trust your data, focusing on the right metrics can make a world of difference. Enterprise Plus We've also started to offer a specific set of additional services for Shopify Plus stores in customizable Enterprise Plus plans. Every Enterprise Plus plan is unique to your enterprise ecommerce needs, whether you're looking for advanced multi-currency tracking, Tag Manager support for custom ad campaigns or checkout flows, or custom LTV reporting for subscription ecommerce. Enterprise Plus plans include everything in basic Enterprise plans, such as support from an analytics expert, plus some combination of the following: Custom setup Custom reporting Manual data audits Segment support Google Tag Manager support Analytics 360 Suite support Optimization support And a whole lot more. See what's included in our enterprise analytics plans. In short, we're here to make sure that you can trust your data -- and use that data for actionable results.  We've come a long way already, but this is just the beginning. The sky's the limit! If you'd like to apply for a Littledata Enterprise plan, the first step is to book a demo online.

by Ari
2019-10-24

Quick tips for subscription stores using Google Analytics custom dimensions

One of the challenges subscription businesses face is differentiating between order types.  The problem For Shopify merchants, offering single purchase options complicates things even more — with single purchase options, order data will show in two places (Shopify and ReCharge). This leads to a major disconnect between user behaviour and orders, unable to leverage the full potential of Google Analytics.  At this point, you probably have a multitude of “known unknowns”, such as: Which traffic sources drive more first time subscription orders? What's my conversion rate on one time purchases? What's my average customer lifetime value (CLV or LTV)? Do my one time purchasers end up converting to subscribers? What's my churn rate month over month? [tip]Get accurate tracking for repeat orders with the ultimate Shopify ReCharge guide.[/tip] The solution Bridging the gap with Littledata Littledata helps bridge different platforms by linking orders betweenShopify, ReCharge and Google Analytics.  [subscribe] Differentiating between order types With Littledata’s improved tracker, merchants can differentiate between order types. For this, we use the Affiliation dimension.  In the Google Analytics report, it will look something like this:  Right away, this information answers a few questions: What is the distribution between my order types? Are my recurring subscription orders growing month over month? Is the average order value (AOV) of subscribers higher than that of one time purchasers?  Both of these can be viewed in this custom report. What traffic sources drive the most sales?  One of the questions our team is asked most often is what sources of traffic drive the most subscription orders?  Short answer: the Affiliation dimension can be used as a secondary dimension in the source/medium reports, or use this custom report.  By using filters to single out an order type, you can easily determine what traffic sources drive the most first time subscription orders. Segment more Segmentation opens up new ways to look at the data as well. Creating two segments for one time purchases and first subscription purchases, you can see how the two types of purchases differ.  Look for behavioural differences like:  Do One Time purchasers AOV higher or lower compared to First Subscription orders? Are users testing the product first and then committing to a subscription?  Littledata custom dimensions Google Analytics custom dimensions are an excellent way to expand your data collection and reporting power. With our Shopify app, Littledata adds these custom dimensions: Littledata - Shopify Customer ID Littledata - Last Transaction Date Littledata - Purchase Count Littledata - Lifetime Revenue Littledata - Payment Gateway With the help of these custom dimensions, we can answer the following questions:  What's my median customer lifetime value (CLV)? How many purchases do customers make in their lifetime? What's my churn rate month over month? Since these are custom dimensions, they cannot be aggregated on Google Analytics, meaning the data will need to be displayed using a different method. For this, we’ll use Google Sheets with the Google Analytics add-on to query the data and pivot tables.  Step 1 - Query all the data you need Metrics Avg. Order Value Revenue Dimensions Littledata - Shopify Customer ID  Littledata - Lifetime Revenue Littledata - Purchase Count Affiliation - to differentiate between the order types.  It should look something like this:  In this case, the custom dimensions are at index 4, 6 and 8. This may differ depending on your setup.  Step 2 - Run the report After you run the report, this will create another sheet in your document. It will look something like this:  Step 3 - Create a pivot table  In the rows section, add the Affiliation dimension to differentiate between the order types.  Shopify will mean a one time purchase (normal purchase). The other two order types are the first subscription order and recurring order.  In the values area, add:  The user IDs summarised by countunique The customer lifetime value summarised by median so that we have the median LTV. We use median over average so that this number is not influenced too much by the outliers.  Purchase count summarised by median.  Average order value  The end result should look something like this:  Step 4 - Interpret the data In this report, we can instantly draw some conclusions:  Most customers make single purchases rather than subscribing  Subscription first order median purchase is 2, so this means users have purchased in the past before committing to a subscription Subscribers purchase 8 times (median value), with a median CLV is around $500.  How to take this further Since we know most customers order at least once before committing to a subscription, we can calculate the average number of days between a single purchase and a first subscription purchase.  When you’re armed with that type of information, you can adjust your email marketing flows accordingly and adjust your remarketing campaigns to shorten or lengthen the number of days your ads show to leads.  With the help of the Customer IDs, we can also calculate the month over month churn rate (we’ll get to that in a follow-up post). It's your turn now How do you use these additional events and custom dimensions in your segmentation?  What was your biggest insight using these events and custom dimensions?  How did it influence your marketing campaigns? Share your experience (and current approach with GA) via the live chat in the bottom corner. I'm curious about the different ways you make use of these additional data points! In the meantime, our team is at the ChargeXSummit in Santa Monica sharing all about our ReCharge connection for subscription-based stores. [note]Now, with a revamped ReCharge connection — ReCharge v2 — you can track subscription lifecycle events with ease![/note]

2019-09-19

Why Shopify is still the best ecommerce platform for larger merchants

It's no accident that Shopify is the cream of the crop in the world of enterprise ecommerce. But what do Shopify's major announcements last week mean for the platform's growth going forward? To remain on top, Shopify must continue investing in areas of opportunity and customer need. That's exactly what they're doing, including major investment in an independent fulfillment network, multi-currency and multiple-store/multi-site improvements for Shopify Plus, and a stunning new range of developer-friendly APIs. In this post, I'll look at: Which types of ecommerce merchants are using the major platforms Shopify's announcements at the Shopify Unite conference 2019 What these announcements mean for larger retailers, Shopify experts and agencies Who's using what: ecommerce platforms by size and use I've been crunching the numbers in several different ways these past few weeks, and my findings were consistent: Shopify is the platform of choice for mid-sized to large stores globally. Last week at the annual Shopify Unite partner event, Shopify announced the plans that will keep Shopify leading the pack (Magento, Salesforce Commerce Cloud, BigCommerce, etc.). Shopify's recent announcements confirm my research findings. Shopify will continue to be the ecommerce platform with the strongest growth in larger stores. At first I looked at trend data from BuiltWith that showed the number of net installs on each platform over the past year. Only the top 1 million websites were measured (as defined by BuiltWith.com). When it came to pure volume of installs, WooCommerce came out on top. However, the average WooCommerce store is much smaller and less active than the average Shopify store. I confirmed this by looking at our own data set of over 4,000 stores on these ecommerce platforms: The bars represent range from the bottom to top quartile of store sizes, with the purple marker representing median store size. While Magento 2 and Salesforce Commerce Cloud had higher median store sizes (32k and 107k monthly visits, respectively), Shopify had a very consistent interquartile range of 6,000 to 60,000 monthly visits. By contrast, WooCommerce only had one quarter of stores receiving over 10,000 monthly visits — and zero stores doing more than 2.5 million visits in our data set. In other words, if this trend continues, Shopify is positioned to take on a big share of the stores migrating from Magento 1 over the next year or so. And that's not all. What this means for merchants using Littledata These larger stores will need a range of robust apps to extend Shopify’s platform, especially when it comes to analytics. We've responded to this need in a many ways, including: Launching the only recommended Segment connection for Shopify and Shopify Plus Rebuilding our Shopify data layer and tracking script for speed and performance at scale Standardising Littledata's Enterprise Plans to provide account management and SLAs Working with select clients to build private connectors and apps to bridge legacy systems In other words, Littledata's commitment to Shopify's ecosystem has only continued to grow. We hope the pattern continues as we hone our popular Shopify integrations like ReCharge for subscription analytics, and continue to improve our better smart connections for other popular apps (CartHook, Refersion, Bold Cashier) over the coming months. [subscribe heading="Try Littledata free for 14 days" background_color="green" button_text="get started"] What this means for Shopify users Enterprise-grade features In the past, global brands running a network of stores in multiple countries have been frustrated by the simplicity of Shopify’s setup. The launch of features such as multi-currency, multi-language and multi-store login from a single Shopify Plus dashboard will go a long way in quelling those user frustrations — all while making Shopify Plus an attractive alternative for current users of Salesforce Commerce Cloud. Fulfillment network to compete head-to-head with Amazon (FBA) Fulfillment is the biggest headache for DTC brands selling globally, and FBA is currently the only game in town for end-to-end purchasing and logistics. However, as ecommerce brands scale, more and more are looking to "own the experience" from start to finish. This includes branded packaging and visibility of delivery on the customers' end. Both of these things may very well have a better solution in Shopify Fulfillment Network: Amazon vs Shopify. @aobtweetz says Shopify is like retail entertainment: consumers who want to read the blog, engage with the brand and then buy - not just buy a commodity on Amazon @debriefevent #ShopifyUnite — Edward Upton (@eUpton) June 21, 2019 The network will start in the US. While it will take time to scale, early looks indicate it will be a sensible way for Shopify to spend its large pile of cash while pulling itself away from the crowded pack of SaaS ecommerce. Developer-first attitude We developers love companies that don’t forget their product-first roots. Much of Shopify’s growth has been due to making the platform easy to extend while encouraging a vibrant yet curated app store. Shopify continues to exercise caution when offering its existing app partners access to new core features (subscription billing, opening up new APIs for partners to develop on). A staggering 11 new APIs were announced at this Unite alone. While Shopify clearly believes that core experiences like checkout and payment should be owned and developed by Shopify itself, many non-core features (including many types of reporting) are actively pushed to partners with a relevant app or service. A living example of Shopify's developer-first approach? Their new Shopify app CLI, which speeds up timetables for new app launches. Where does Shopify go next? After more than doubling its number of active stores over the last two years, Shopify's current haul of 820,000 active stores is in good position to surpass 1.5 million stores within the next two years. For many larger Shopify partners, perhaps the more important pattern of growth isn't Shopify's standard offerings — it's Shopify Plus. [subscribe heading="Try Littledata free for 14 days" background_color="green" button_text="get started"] At a recent Commerce Plus event in London (organised by Shopify Plus), the main "complaint" was that Shopify’s sales reps "can’t onboard shops fast enough". With a newly revamped, user-centered design, Shopify Plus is an exciting platform to be a part of right now. It's only going up from here. If you didn't get a chance to read about everything Shopify announced last week in Toronto, don't worry. We have you covered! Check out our full recap of announcements. Also, check out our award-winning Google Analytics Shopify app. With AI-based tech, the app fixes your Shopify analytics by providing: Website benchmarks by industry Ecommerce benchmarking Shopify reporting Customer lifetime value Average order value Other crucial data metrics Wondering how your site compares? Check out our list of essential benchmarks for Shopify stores.

2019-06-25

Littledata featured on the Honest Ecommerce podcast for Shopify stores

I recently stopped by the Honest Ecommerce podcast to give listeners the lowdown on ecommerce analytics. Check it out to learn how to fix tracking for Shopify stores! Get the free podcast episode here: Ep. 21 - How To Track Shopify Sales & Marketing (In A Way That Is Accurate & Useful) Honest Ecommerce is one of the fastest growing podcasts for Shopify and Shopify Plus store owners, from the good folks at Electric Eye agency in Columbus, Ohio. While the episode is focused on tips for Shopify stores, we chat about ecommerce tracking for every type of store, whatever platform and business model you're using, and how to do more with less, rather than getting bogged down in too much -- or inaccurate -- data. In the episode we cover: Why we started Littledata and the journey so far What is wrong with your data? (Does your Shopify data match what you see in Google Analytics?) What KPIs should you be looking at in Google Analytics? Using data to drive your business Analytics audits & ecommerce benchmarking How our integrations work, including Facebook Ads, ReCharge and Refersion Littledata's new Segment app for Shopify stores How to connect Facebook Ads data with Google Analytics automatically Which types of ecommerce sites get the most out of Littledata? And much more! :) Check it out and let us know what you'd like to hear about in our next podcast appearance. Haven't tried Littledata yet? Explore our connections or sign up for a free trial today. Transcript [00:00:01.750] - AriYou don't want to start redesigning the site or changing your product line based on a really limited sample because it could be just random. So the more data you can get, the more you can make sophisticated decisions. [00:00:16.300] - AnnetteWelcome to Honest Ecommerce, where we are dedicated to cutting through the b.s. and finding actionable advice for online store owners. [00:00:24.000] - ChaseI'm your host, Chase Clymer [00:00:26.050] - Annetteand I'm your host, Annette Grant [00:00:28.660] - Bothand we believe running an online business does not have to be complicated or a guessing game. [00:00:33.160] - AnnetteIf you are struggling into scaling your sales electric I is here to help to apply to work with us. Today's episode of Honest Eommerce. We welcome the co-founder of Littledata, Ari Messer. [00:00:53.930] - ChaseHe's going to explain to us that our data is broken and how to fix it. [00:01:04.310] - ChaseHey everybody welcome back to yet another episode of Honest Ecommerce. I do want to take one second to say thank you to everyone that's actually listening to it. I've gotten so many e-mails from people or just correspondents where people are like "we actually listened to your podcast. Like I learned something from your podcast." So now I have proof that I'm not just talking into the cloud. [00:01:23.240] - AnnetteWell Chase I hate to break it to you. That's me. I've made a lot of aliases and I'm emailing you to make you feel good about yourself. [00:01:29.360] - ChaseCool. Well then that's a bummer (laughs). Anyways welcome to Honest Ecommerce. [00:01:34.730] - ChaseI'm Chase Clymer, this is my co-host Annette Grant. And today we welcome to the show Ari from Littledata. He is going to kick our butts into gear with Google Analytics. Welcome to the show Ari, and let us know how you know so much about analytics. [00:01:49.130] - AriIt's good to be here. And I actually have I haven't created any aliases but I have the show that I've heard so far. I think it's great to have something here that's, you know, merchants really find useful and find that other agencies and partners too. [00:02:02.910] - ChaseSo yeah I just don't like to blow smoke up people's butts I like it to be honest and real. It takes hard work. [00:02:09.320] - AriYes. Yeah I think there's a lot more space for that now. If you can speak intelligently to people, they'll pay attention. [00:02:17.360] - AriThe more you learn about analytics, the more there is to know (laughs). Basically I joined Littledata as a co-founder a few years ago, and we've been on Shopify for about two years now. We're adding a lot of connections, the main ones being to Google Analytics. So what I knew before joining was really about how analytics could be used to help people grow a SaaS app, because they really were in the startup space a lot and now have learned more and more about analytics for ecommerce. So that's what we're here to talk about today. [00:02:53.150] - ChaseAwesome. So what was that transition like? How did you go from helping SaaS companies to building Littledata. [00:03:00.230] - AriYeah, it was really a natural transition. As we all know, ecommerce is huge. It's growing in all directions, it's continuing to grow and not just in the US, but all around the world. I'd had some cool gigs helping SaaS companies build out integrations. I used to work mostly on the product marketing side. Now, being this close to the company, I sort of do all kinds of things. It was really a lot of those integrations were either directly ecommerce-related or something that was sort of peripherally commerce-related, like helping build out an integration to do retargeting for card abandonment and stuff like that. [00:03:41.390] - AriAnd then with Littledata I met Edward Upton, the original founder in London, and kind of came on and as a Google Analytics consultant at first and just thought, "oh wow, this is a really cool idea — you're actually helping people fix their data, not just report on it." [00:03:57.590] - ChaseSo what is one of those common mistakes that you guys were seeing out there with the data? What's broken with my data? [00:04:08.370] - AriWe do have an audit tool that people can plug in and sort of get a sense for what might be tracked correctly and what's not. So there are all kinds of things that can go wrong. I think for Shopify stores in particular, there's often a mismatch between how sales are being calculated. So that includes different parts of the checkout funnel, when types of products or product groups people are adding to cart that are not purchased, and all the way through actual sales and refunds. [00:04:42.870] - ChaseI can agree with that. I noticed there's always a mismatch between the number in Google Analytics and the number in Shopify. [00:04:49.790] - AriAbsolutely. And with our app, we basically fix that issue. You know sometimes, you have to do a few more connections and activate some of our plugins (like if you're using ReCharge to do subscription sales or whatever it might be). But basically, what the app does, (not to get too geeky) is use server-side tracking so that every single user action and every sale is tracked in Google Analytics. So what you see in Shopify will match what you see in GA. [00:05:22.170] - AnnetteSo you can get yours to match Google Analytics? [00:05:26.610] - AriYeah, I would say 99.9%. [00:05:30.780] - AnnetteWow. So if people if things aren't tracking properly, is it because the developer didn't set up Google Analytics correctly? Let's kind of peel it back for for our listeners. If they're looking at their Google Analytics, what are some red flags where they would be in need of "pick your theme and get it in the app." Google Analytics sometimes gets very confusing, so walk me through what are the top things to look at and what needs to be fixed? [00:06:13.260] - AriThe main thing is just like Chase was mentioning that just raw sales numbers like when you look at the number in your bank account maybe doesn't match what's Shopify shows. And that doesn't match what's in Google Analytics. So that's definitely a red flag because if you're looking at any sort of marketing campaign — I know we're all getting more and more sophisticated about using audiences and all this stuff like fancy stuff for retargeting and trying to sort of sell people stuff that they're more likely to want to buy — often, you go in there and look and say "well this campaign seems to have worked really well, and yet, the overall sales number is not matching what should be the number of conversions that we got. So it's any kind of mismatch like that, when you're like "this just doesn't seem right." And then of course as you grow, being off by a couple percent can means more and more amount of money. So any kind of mismatch is kind of the thing to look for. [00:07:15.670] - ChaseYeah I mean it's just a snowball effect. Like "oh it's just a few dollars" but that can add up. [00:07:20.760] - AriAnd I wouldn't blame the developers for a lot of it. Some of it's just that Shopify's native tracking and their native Google Analytics integrations are fine, but they're just not that sophisticated. And as we all know, part of that's because they have this really awesome app ecosystem. So you kind of have to find the right tools to make sure it works so that nothing is missing. I mean, I've been guilty of it too, not tagging campaigns consistently, like when you're making your Facebook campaigns and then you start to add more, like the snowball effect. Like how do you really organize them or make sure everything's tracked right? [00:08:03.980] - ChaseThere's just so much in there. So I just want to bring it down to simplify it a bit for our listeners. So, you know, I've got Joe's shoe shop. We're selling sneakers and we're real business. This isn't like a side hustle, this is my full time job. What are the KPIs I should be looking at in Google Analytics? Let's just try to educate people about Google Analytics a bit. [00:08:28.600] - AriSo one thing you should be looking at is how detailed...like if you start to wonder "is this product group performing well?" so stuff that's sort of outside normal questions about overall how's the business doing. So stuff like payment cart abandonment, products being added to the cart, particular pages getting more views than other pages. What are some of the basic thing is that make sense? Like it's the sort of details if you think about merchandising or you're thinking about the next season or what you're going to do for a promotion if you want to go in and look in GA to try to figure out a data-driven view of of what to sell or what to promote or things that might get more subscriptions. [00:09:26.500] - AriLet's say the shoe business is on subscription, running shoes where you've got a new one every month or every quarter or something. You'd want to go into GA and be able to see the type of product that you should promote. [00:10:55.390] - ChaseI think a common oversight with analytics is "it's just data." It's just a bunch of numbers and you have to extrapolate from those numbers and make inferences. You use that data to drive your business and if there isn't like a on-size-fits-all approach to it, it's definitely business-specific. [00:11:20.650] - AriYeah for sure. And so for us, you know with Littledata, what the app does is first, fix the tracking, so then for your particular business, you can go in and figure out the key metrics to to pay attention to. With ReCharge, I'm sure you have a lot of clients doing subscription business. And we're definitely seeing a lot of people that are either experimenting with subscriptions or that's like all of what they do, you know for like athletic supplements or workout clothes or whatever it is. [00:11:52.240] - AriI'm just bringing it up but I think it's a really good sort of case study in how a basic fix in analytics can really help. And you might want to just see if your advertising campaigns are leading to more first time purchases or recurring purchases, like people signing up to get stuff every month. And unless you've set up tracking correctly for the checkout flow, you'll go into Google Analytics...you could be running your company for years and go in (to GA) and suddenly realize there's no way to see that that split. [00:12:29.870] - ChaseYeah that's definitely important information. [00:12:32.720] - AnnetteThis might be a left field question, but can the app at all help with search engine optimization like work the organic there if things are behind the scenes are running smoother? Like could it help you notice things that would help you rise to the top a little bit more? [00:12:51.440] - AriIt's definitely not the main focus, but we do have some fixes (both sort of audit checks) and actually website benchmarks against other sites which you can also see in the app, against Shopify stores and things. For technical performance stuff like page load speed, it actually does have a big effect on SEO. [00:13:12.810] - AnnetteOh cool. So just to make sure I understand this, inside the app, you will have competition in there and I could see like their page speed load compared to mine? [00:13:22.070] - AriExactly. [00:13:22.170] - AnnetteOh that's awesome. OK. Now that's that's a huge value. [00:13:26.460] - AriYeah. We have those benchmarks broken down by sector, so you could look and say (obviously you can't see the actual stores it's all anonymized, I should say that upfront) but you could go in and say against other people selling shoes with an average order value around one hundred dollars per purchase, "is this a good page load speed, is this a good conversion rate?" stuff like that. [00:13:53.300] - AnnetteThat's really valuable. [00:13:53.410] - ChaseIt is. So there's data everywhere. Is it only Google Analytics you guys are taking a look at? [00:14:00.220] - AriSo the main app does connect with Google Analytics. Our main Shopify app is called Google Analytics by Littledata. By the time this podcast comes out, hopefully we will have launched an app for Segment. So Segment is sort of a connector between all kinds of different apps and platforms. And what this app will do is pull Shopify data, and again making sure everything's tracked correctly (checkout steps, sales, etc.) and pull that into Segment, so then you can connect it from Segment to any destination, which includes Google Analytics. [00:14:46.640] - ChaseThat's wonderful. Yeah I'm over here on the website and I see there's so many connections you guys have set up. [00:14:51.160] - AriCool, yeah. We're building out more, so to the listeners, if there are things you'd like to see, or if you've found a particular analytics problem, let us know and maybe we can fix it or help you find a way to automate or automatically check if it's working or not. [00:15:11.540] - AnnetteDo you want to explain those connections. Like I'm actually looking at your site right now too. So if I were to call in to see if I could get the app, what are some of those things that you would talk, about like the Facebook Ads connection that you have? [00:15:22.710] - AriSure yeah. So basically, for all the connections other than Segment, first you connect to Google Analytics. We're using that as sort of the ultimate source of truth. We always recommend to clients that it's good to gather lots of data and you want to be able to get detailed, but you really want to focus on just a couple of core metrics that are most important (like we were saying earlier) to your business. [00:15:59.700] - AriSo for some people, that will be how their Facebook Ad cost contributes to a particular detail about sales for one kind of product or a new product type or sales type or whatever it is. So what the Facebook Ads connection does is actually pull your ad costs and campaign details into GA so that then you don't have to rely on what Facebook is telling you in terms of how well the ad has performed and how many conversions you got. Instead, you can look and say "oh this campaign actually led to people adding a bunch of this type of product to the cart" or "it ended up leading to X amount of subscription revenue" [00:16:41.740] - ChaseSo you can drill down to the product level to see what had been added to the card from that campaign. [00:16:48.590] - AriExactly. Google makes that pretty easy to do with their own products, but they make it fairly complicated for people using other platforms. And so what a connection like that does is pull in the Facebook data and then suddenly plug that in along with everything else. [00:17:04.710] - ChaseCan I use this app to also see that information from Google AdWords and Google Shopping? [00:17:09.600] - AriYou can. The AdWords connection works a little different whereas it's pulling...I mean the effect is similar, but it actually lets you pull your Google Analytics data into AdWords so you can see sales again...like product sales next to campaign performance. [00:18:20.720] - ChaseWell I'm one hundred percent going to do a demo of this app. This is awesome. [00:18:25.160] - AnnetteYeah I have a question...Chase, you might be able to answer this too. So for instance, are my Facebook Ads currently connected to Google Analytics automatically, or do you have to have an app like Littledata to do that for you? [00:18:41.420] - AriI'd have to take a look at yours in particular, but in general, unless you've gone through and set it up, no they won't be. You might have Facebook as a source, but that won't give you much detail. [00:18:54.640] - AnnetteRight because, specifically going back to what you guys just talked about, I have an ad running right now for a piece of equipment that's a higher dollar and I'm making sales not the ad, but I'm not selling that particular product and I want to drill down and see exactly what I'm selling off of the ad, but I can't do that in Facebook Ads but this would enable me to do that, correct? [00:19:18.940] - AriExactly. That's the perfect test. Yeah. [00:19:21.080] - ChaseAnd you can take it one step further and see if those people are viewing that expensive product for a long time or create a segment to retarget those people and educate those people. Set up some drip campaigns if you have their email? [00:19:37.360] - AriExactly super smart. It's kind of like maybe they're not buying it but they actually were really interested in it. They're like "oh I'll try this first" [00:19:46.890] - ChaseAnd then it's your job to market them and educate them. Here's the thing, I think with just any advertising campaigns, people go for the kill, like instantly it's "buy this buy this buy this." You need to explain what the product is first and educate them about the product, especially if it's an expensive product. No one's just going to drop one hundred dollars plus on something that they didn't know existed before your ad. [00:20:12.500] - AnnetteThey won't drop 500 not knowing what it is? (laughs) [00:20:15.150] - AnnetteI'm going to run this ad, new product 30 days and do it. But what's happening (exactly my issue, so sign me up for the Littledata app today) because I don't know what they're buying. They're not buying the high dollar, they're buying other products and I want to see how that ad is tricking down to that. That's something before we even started this conversation — I didn't know that that connection would do that. [00:20:42.740] - ChaseWe have clients ask all the time to drill down like, what are people doing from the ad if they're not...It's like yeah you made money off the ad your turned out fantastic but they're like cool, like what were they buying? There's no easy way to see that in Facebook. [00:20:56.000] - AriTotally. And even when we started Littledata, we didn't realize that at first. And as we started working with more companies, we were doing custom setups with Google Tag Manager to try to figure this out, and then we were like "wait a sec. If we could just build something that would pull this into Google Analytics, voila." [00:21:16.320] - AnnetteThat is so valuable. My brain is kind of rocked. That's awesome. [00:21:23.960] - ChaseYeah you just ruined Annette's weekend. Now she's going play with this. [00:21:31.610] - ChaseIt takes time to get data that you can make a decision from. You don't need to be looking your data everyday. Unless you're getting so many page views and sessions a day, which is top tier million dollar companies, you don't have enough data to make a decision from 24 hours ago. Even with ads, if you're not spending thousands of dollars a day you know your ads run for like a week before you see what the hell is going on. [00:22:03.040] - AnnetteActually Chase, you taught me that. Like this specific ad that I'm running right now...t's what, the twenty eighth of the month? We started running it at the beginning and I said "hey I'm not even going to look at this. Let's just let it roll, like let's not even look at." I looked at it yesterday and I was like "wait, what's happening here?" I would know if I sold that high dollar product. We didn't. And I'm like I'm just going to let this roll for a while just not even pay attention to it and focus on everything else. And when I looked at it yesterday...we're selling stuff, we're not selling that product, the ad is working, but how? [00:22:32.730] - ChaseYeah the attribution on Facebook is unique in and of itself...and honestly you can get some sketchy agencies that make that thing really long. And they get that attribution up and they're like "Yeah, we made you all this money" but you're like where is it? Where's that money? [00:22:52.300] - AriYeah. [00:22:52.370] - AnnetteBeing a store owner, I have wonderful developers that I work with but sometimes I try to do some of this stuff myself. So when I now, after my mind's been blown and I get the app, is this something that you need to have a developer connect for you, or is it easy enough for a DIY store owner to do themselves? [00:23:17.790] - AriYeah we've definitely tried to make it easy enough. And the good thing is for Shopify (and we do have clients on other platforms like Magento, BigCommerce) it's fully automated. So unless you have a really customized theme (in which case we do have separate setup steps where our support team can help you) it all should just happen automatically [00:23:39.020] - AnnetteAnd that is for Facebook Ads also? [00:23:41.340] - AriYeah. [00:23:42.560] - AnnetteOh wow. OK. [00:23:44.030] - AriIt'll give you a guide in the app. You'll have to make sure that the campaigns have been named in a certain way. There's some things we can't do automatically. But for those few things that we can't do it, it gives very clear steps. [00:24:00.760] - ChaseSo what size stores does this make sense for? [00:24:07.720] - AriI always say anyone who wants to grow should start tracking things early, because otherwise you'll get to a point where you can't go back and get a start date if the tracking wasn't set. Basically once you start to introduce traffic, our basic plan runs up to about five hundred orders per month. We have the pricing tiered based on sessions, orders or sales, but the number of orders is a pretty good indicator. So once you're starting to get traffic and have some orders come through, it's a good time to go with it. And then for our enterprise plans, where we do help with custom setup and reporting and things as needed, those are generally larger — you know, bigger DTC brands doing maybe five to 50 million a year. [00:24:55.020] - AnnetteAwesome. Just for our listeners (this is something I always like when apps offer this), Littledata offers a twenty five percent off discount if you pay the annual fee upfront so you can save some serious dollars. [00:25:09.330] - AriOh yeah. Hey you're doing my job for me! That's a good point. [00:25:13.420] - AnnetteIt's always nice to be rewarded if you're going to pay for something upfront, as a consumer. [00:25:22.160] - AriYeah. And we do find like Chase was saying, it takes a while to start gathering the data for advertising campaigns, and also just for understanding user flows on your site because you really need a lot of information. You don't want to start redesigning the site or changing your product line based on a really limited sample, because it could be just random. So the more data you can get, the more you can make sophisticated decisions. [00:25:47.740] - ChaseAwesome. I think that is the gem of the podcast right there. And with that I think we're going to wrap this one up. [00:25:54.700] - ChaseIs there anything that you want to leave with our guests? I know everyone probably want to go check out the app. It's Littledata.io slash Shopify (90 percent of our listeners are probably on Shopify). [00:26:05.430] - AriYeah, nothing in particular...ifyou're using ReCharge, our Shopify ReCharge connection is really powerful will probably solve a lot of tracking issues that you thought couldn't be solved. So check that out. And that's about it. It's a great podcast. Good to be here. [00:26:23.970] - AnnetteNo, thank you! I do appreciate it. You actually answered the question I was going to ask Chase after the podcast (laughs). [00:26:30.500] - ChaseI hate when we have podcasts when it's like a sales letter, but for this app, it's just so fancy — it works. It solves problems and that's what people want. [00:26:41.840] - AnnetteActually it's solving problems I didn't even know there was a solution for. So that's exciting. Thank you Ari. We appreciate having you on today. [00:26:52.690] - AriOh and you just one more thing...If anyone has questions, even if they don't need the app, we do a lot on our blog around analytics issues. So feel free to write to us with topics you'd like covered and we'll sort of investigate. [00:27:09.790] - ChaseOh cool awesome I'll check that. I'll check the blog out too. Awesome. Well thanks a lot.

by Ari
2019-05-29
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