Is it worth attending that ecommerce conference?

Ecommerce conference season is upon us. In the past few weeks, the Littledata team was at Shop.org in Las Vegas, Paris Retail Week, and the Google Expert Summit in Waterloo, Canada -- three very different events in three rather different countries. Then we also hit up Agile Cambridge and Technology for Marketing in the UK, the UPRISE fest in Dublin, TechDay LA in sunny Los Angeles and the BigCommerce partner summit in Austin. And while we unfortunately couldn't make ReCharge's Recur event for the subscription industry, or Hawke Media's Hawkefest, the ultimate anti-conference, many of our partners and merchants were there and had awesome things to say. But wait a second. Slow down! With so many exciting events to potentially attend during what is already one of the busiest times of year for those of us in the industry (Black Friday is just around the corner from a marketer's perspective), how do you choose? Is that conference you've been debating attending really worth it? If we've learned anything... Over the years I've had a mixed experience with conferences. But with Littledata we've found a good rhythm. Of course it helps that we're on the cutting edge of new technology, actually using AI and machine learning as opposed to just talking about it, and that we already have major customers around the world, even though we're technically still a 'startup'. This gives us a wide range of high-quality speaking and learning opportunities. But at the same time our productive conference experiences haven't happened by accident, whether for ecommerce or general tech events. We've found such a good conference rhythm -- a dance that produces a consistently high ROI on in-person events -- by looking closely at our own data on a quarterly and yearly basis. Our strategy is always evolving, but some stats have been consistent. For example, we discovered that at the right events: Though we don't necessarily have a higher win rate for enterprise leads from conferences, the sales cycle is condensed, on average 3x faster from meeting to close. This saves our sales team valuable time chasing down leads, and also helps us improve our product, pitches and processes at a faster rate. Agencies we meet in person are 4x more likely to refer us a customer within the next 30 days -- even if we never did a formal product demo. What's your company's take on conferences? Here are a few insights that might help you get more out of the conference experience, whether that means big tech industry events or smaller, focused meetups. [subscribe] There is no such thing as a must-attend conference The great irony with ecommerce conferences is that they tend to be scheduled at what are already busy times for those of us in the industry. Whether it's the shows we attended these past 6 weeks that overlapped with everyone getting back to work after summer holidays, or European standbys like NetComm Suisse's later fall events and One to One in Monaco every March, right after SXSW in Austin, it's either an embarrassment of riches or -- depending on your perspective -- a really confusing hodge podge of hard-to-classify opportunities. There are simply too many choices, and it's especially hard to decide whether to attend a tech conference or meetup if your company has never attended that particular show before. One thing I love about our industry is that merchants (stores and ecommerce managers) and vendors (apps, platforms, consultants, designers and agencies) are all in the same boat. In short, we have no time for BS. We want events that focus on real information, emerging technologies and human connection. So how do you decide? First things first, make your own list. There are a ton of blog posts out there about 'must attend' conferences, those 'not to miss'. Give me a break! Every business is unique, and you're only as viable as your buyer personas. So make a list of conferences, events and meetups that might help connect you with your prime customers and best partners. Brainstorm, look online, ask around. Make your own list and plan to review every quarter. Then once you've made that list, on paper or Trello or however you work best, go through the following checklist with as many members of your team as possible, especially if you can bring in decision makers from both Product and Marketing. A simple checklist When deciding if you should attend a conference for the first or second time, it's useful to have a checklist for quick, consistent analysis. The checklist I use is deceptively simple. It has only 5 indicators. Would one significant sale pay for itself in terms of customer acquisition cost (CAC)? If the conference did work out, is it something you would attend every year? Would it be the right place for you to speak, either now or in the future? Is this your scene, your community? Are there companies, merchants, agencies, vendors etc. attending whom you wouldn't see any other time this year? (Even just one counts, if sufficiently high-value.) In short, if you can tick all five boxes then you should attend the conference. If you can only tick four, it's probably worth attending but needs more debate. If this is the case, then considering point number one in detail -- looking at your current LTV/CAC ratio and considering how the conference could help improve or at least maintain it -- is essential. For ecommerce tech companies like our own, this generally means one big sale or partnership. For ecommerce sites it can also take the form of discovering new tech (like Littledata, Klickly or ReCharge) that will help increase sales and marketing ROI. If you can tick all five boxes then you should definitely attend the conference The checklist works even if you've already attended the conference in the past. Just consider point two already covered and proven! If you're in the ecommerce space, definitely consider platform-specific conferences. Shopify and Magento have regular events and meetups around the world, and word on the street is that BigCommerce will be really ramping up their local partner events in 2019. Shopify Unite has consistently been that rare conference that ticks all the boxes for us here at Littledata, but that doesn't mean we're ignoring others that only tick four. We've cast our net wide (using the checklist of course) and are still seeing results. If you want to get a head start on conference browsing for next year,  Veeqo has created a calendar of best worldwide ecommerce conferences for 2019. Across the board remember this: success at a conference almost never comes in the form of expected outcomes. Yes, the best outcomes will be aligned with your sales and marketing goals, but sometime the biggest benefits will not be clear for 3, 6 or even 12 months down the line. That's why we do quarterly and yearly reviews of all in-person activities, from networking events to large conferences. I suggest you do the same. Most importantly, have fun! Gone are the days of boring trade shows. Show up. Make connections. And if we're there too, come say hi! Maybe nobody can make analytics sexy, but we at least promise to make them useful. And usefulness is a good place to start...

by Ari
2018-10-23

Categorising websites by industry sector: how we solved a technical challenge

When Littledata first started working with benchmark data we found the biggest barrier to accuracy was self-reporting on industry sectors. Here’s how we built a better feature to categorise customer websites. Google Analytics has offered benchmarks for many years, but with limited usefulness since the industry sector field for the website is often inaccurate. The problem is that GA is typically set up by a developer or agency without knowledge or care about the company’s line of business - or understanding of what that industry sector is used for. To fix this problem Littledata needed a way to categorise websites which didn’t rely on our users selecting from a drop-down list. Google Analytics has offered benchmarks for many years, but with limited usefulness since the industry sector field for the website is often inaccurate. [subscribe] The first iteration: IBM Watson NLP and a basic taxonomy Our first iteration of this feature used a pre-trained model as part of IBM Watson’s set of natural language APIs. It was simple: we sent the URL, and back came a category according to the Internet Advertising Bureau taxonomy. After running this across thousands of websites we quickly realised the limitations: It failed with non-English websites It failed when website homepage was heavy with images rather than text It failed when the website was rendered via Javascript Since our customer base is growing most strongly outside the UK, with graphical product lists on their homepage, and using the latest Javascript frameworks (such as React), the failure rate was above 50% and rising. So we prioritised a second iteration. The second iteration: Extraction, translation and public APIs The success criteria was that the second iteration could categorise 8 sites which the first iteration failed with, and should go on to be 80% accurate. We also wanted to use mainly public APIs, to avoid maintaining code libraries, so we broke the detection process into 3 steps: Extracting meaningful text from the website Translating that text into English Categorising the English text to an IAB category and subcategory The Watson API seemed to perform well when given sufficient formatted text, at minimal cost per use, so we kept this for step 3. For step 2, the obvious choice was Google Translate API. The magic of this API is that it can detect the language of origin (with a minimum of ~4 words) and then provide the English translation. That left us focussing the development time on step 1 - extracting meaningful text. Initially we looked for a public API, and found the Aylien article extraction API. However, after testing it out on our sample sites, it suffered from the same flaws as the IBM Watson processing: unable to handle highly graphical sites, or those with Javascript rendering. To give us more control of the text extraction, we then opted to use a PhantomJS browser on our server. Phantom provides a standard function to extract the HTML and text from the rendered page, but at the expense of being somewhat memory intensive. Putting the first few thousand characters of the website text into translation and then categorisation produced better results, but still suffered from false positives - for example if the text contained legal-ease about data privacy it got categorised as technical or legal. We then looked at categorising the page title and meta description, which any SEO-savvy site would stuff with industry language. The problem here is that the text can be short, and mainly filled with brand names. After struggling for a day we hit upon the magic formula: categorising both the page title and the page body text, and looking for consistent categorisation across the two. By using two text sources from the same page we more than doubled the accuracy, and it worked for all but one of our ‘difficult’ websites. This hold-out site - joone.fr - has almost no mention of its main product (diapers, or nappies), which makes it uniquely hard to categorise. So to put it all the new steps together, here’s how it works for our long-term enterprise client MADE.com's French-language site. Step 1: Render the page in PhantomJS and extract the page title and description Step 2: Extract the page body text, remove any cookie policy and format Step 3: Translate both text strings in Google Translate Step 4: Compare the categorisations of the title vs page body text Step 5: If the two sources match, store the category I’m pleased that a few weeks after launching the new website classifier we have found it to be 95% accurate. Benchmarking is a core part of our feature set, informing everything that we do here at Littledata. From Shopify store benchmarks to general web performance data, the improved accuracy and deeper industry sector data is helping our customers get actionable insights to improve their ecommerce performance. If you’re interested in using our categorisation API, please contact us for a pilot. And note that Littledata is also recruiting developers, so if you like solving these kind of challenges, think about coming to join us!

2018-10-16

Are you benchmarking your ecommerce site in the right sector?

Littledata launched benchmarks for websites two years ago. They quickly became a key feature of our app, and as customers became more engaged, so did ideas for how to improve our benchmarking and the algorithms that learn from those benchmarks. In response to customer feedback and deeper research into industry sectors, we've made some really exciting improvements over the last few months to make the comparisons even more useful -- and even more dynamic. The changes are five-fold. Detailed sectors and sub-sectors. Almost every customer we talked to said the benchmark comparison was most useful if it was for very similar sites. Previously we only had 50 high-level sectors to compare with; now we have hundreds of low-level sectors. You can visualise the full range. Smarter auto-categorisation of your website. Our machine learning process now has a 95% chance of finding the best sector for your website, meaning you can compare against the most useful benchmark without filling in a single form! Ability to manually change industry sector. And of course, if you're in that 5% that needs human input, then you (or your Enterprise account manager) can pick a better sector in the general app settings page. You might also want to change sectors just to see how you compare. No problem. Benchmarks for technology stacks. Want to see if you are making the most of a technology such as Shopify or Yieldify? Now you can compare with other sites using the same technology, making our ecommerce benchmarking even more powerful for agencies and web developers. Benchmarks for starter websites. Previously we only generated benchmarks for sites with at least 500 monthly visits. We dropped that to 200 monthly visits, so starter websites can see a comparison - and see more detail as they grow. We've launched a live visualisation of how our AI-based website categorizer is mapping a range of industry sectors. It offers a full overview of website categories and segments. And you can drill down to see more details. For example, we've seen a big rise in wine, coffee and health shake retailers this year, many of whom are using our ReCharge integration to get insight into their subscription business models. As our algorithms learn about ecommerce businesses selling beverages of many varieties and automatically categorises sites accordingly, you can now look closely at a particular segment to see how your site compares. Littledata is an Agile company. We're constantly iterating, and continuously improving the benchmarks to make them more actionable, so please give us feedback if you'd like to see more. Happy benchmarking! [subscribe]

2018-09-25

New help center articles on Shopify tracking and ReCharge integration

We recently launched the Littledata Help Center to make it easier for customers to find the most relevant answers to their analytics questions. You can think of it as the more formal, technically-minded cousin of our popular analytics blog (which you're reading right now). With detailed new articles on Shopify tracking and how our ReCharge integration works, the Littledata Help Center is a go-to resource for current customers and ecommerce managers looking for a clearer view of how to use Google Analytics effectively. About our Help Center Like many startups, we began by using our blog as the main support resource, with articles on everything from Google Analytics to GDPR. Yet as we've grown, so have the number of setup guides and technical details we feel we should provide for a seamless user experience. In short, our support articles have outgrown the blog! Not to worry, blog fans. The blog will continue to be a resource for anyone interested in ecommerce analytics. We've been honoured at all the industry attention our blog has received, and we look forward to growing both resources side-by-side in the coming years. Shopify tracking Until you know what to look for, choosing the right Shopify reporting app can seem like a daunting process. There are a number of apps that are good at tracking just one thing, or helping you visualise some of the tracking you already have set up. Littledata's Shopify app is different. It's become especially popular with Shopify Plus stores and medium-sized Shopify sites on the enterprise growth path because it fixes your tracking and provides a full optimisation suite, including automated reports, benchmarks and buyer personas, to help optimise for dramatically higher revenue and conversions. New support articles help break down how this all-in-one solution works, including what you can track with our Shopify reporting app and setup guides for basic and custom installations. [subscribe] ReCharge integration Advanced Google Analytics integration for stores using ReCharge is one of our most popular integrations. It's a streamlined way to get accurate subscription analytics, including marketing attribution and LTV reporting. New support articles break down how ReCharge integration works with Littledata. You'll find guides on everything from how to check if the integration is working, to FAQs and more technical articles about tracking first-time versus recurring payments with GA views. We hope you take full advantage of Littledata's Help Center. Of course, you can always reach out to our support team directly from the Intercom popups on our blog, public site and app. We're available Monday to Friday in time zones around the world. Don't hesitate to get in touch, and remember -- your success is our success!

2018-08-21

Intro to the Littledata app (VIDEO)

How does the Littledata app work? It's magic! Or at least it feels that way. This new video gives a quick overview of how it all fits together. Our ecommerce analytics app is the only one on the planet to both fix your tracking and automate reporting. Our customers see dramatic growth, from higher add-to-cart rates to better return on paid search. But what happens first, and what happens next? If you're an ecommerce marketer using Google Analytics, Littledata will make your job a whole lot easier. The process breaks down to four core steps, which you can repeat as often as you'd like. First you connect your analytics account, marketing channels like Google AdWords and Facebook Ads, and website data from tools like Shopify, ReCharge and CartHook. (And yes, we'll help you comply with GDPR). Then you use the Littledata app to audit your analytics setup and fix your tracking. Shopify stores can fix tracking automatically -- other sites get clear recommendations on what to do. [subscribe] If your goals include higher marketing ROI and increased conversions, the next step is to automate reporting with report packs and a smart dashboard, available directly in the app. And then it's time to optimise revenue with industry benchmarks, enhanced reporting and buyer personas, all built automatically. Sign up today for a free audit of your analytics setup, or book a demo to learn more. A complete picture of your ecommerce business is just around the corner!

by Ari
2018-08-14

Introducing Littledata's agency partner program

We're excited to announce a new partner program for agencies! The pilot version was a huge success, so now we're opening up the program to any agency looking for a smarter ecommerce analytics solution. If you're using a BI dashboard and maybe some tools like Data Studio and Supermetrics, that's great, but you still need an advanced analytics solution like Littledata. Our app takes data science to the next level by actually fixing your customers' Google Analytics setups to ensure accurate tracking at every customer touch point. Then the app uses that data to automatically build smart, relevant reports. Additional benefits for partners include advanced setup with GTM and Facebook Pixel, custom reporting and analytics training. It's a win-win! If you're a digital agency with ecommerce clients, Littledata will make your job a whole lot easier. Ecommerce analytics for agencies Partnerships are at the centre of our business. At Shopify Unite this year, we announced the pilot phase of this new program that makes it easier for marketing agencies and ecommerce site developers to bring accurate analytics to their clients. But while Shopify is our most extensive integration, our agency partner program is designed for anyone working the ecommerce space, whether your clients are on Shopify Plus, Magento, Demandware, another platform or a custom build. As long as they're using Google Analytics to track marketing and shopping behaviour, Littledata will help you help them. Key benefits for agencies: Guarantee accurate data for your customers Save time by automating Google Analytics setup and reporting Automated reporting with proven results for ecommerce growth Custom views and dimensions in GA that you can use however you want Google-certified account managers to answer customer questions about analytics Easy access to client reports with our team members feature Analytics training for your team Complete ecommerce analytics suite: Scan and fix tracking issues with our industry-leading analytics audit tool Automate reporting with both pre-built report packs and custom reports for your client base Smart marketing tools, including buyer personas and Enhanced Ecommerce tracking for more effective AdWords retargeting Web and ecommerce benchmarks, plus an option for private benchmarks among your clients Subscription analytics for clients selling subscription boxes or offering subscription plans (we offer the only advanced Google Analytics integration for ReCharge stores) Easy integrations with apps like Refersion and Carthook How it works Our onboarding process for ecommerce agencies is very straightforward. It starts with a conversation where we can learn about each other's businesses. If it's a good match, we move on to sign a partnership agreement with clear terms for referrals and revenue share, then get you started with a test account for your first referral. The Littledata app creates a test property so that you - and your client, if you wish - can see how our tracking compares against the current Google Analytics setup. Once you go live with the new tracking, we work directly with your team to help you get the most out of the app's functionality, and begin to develop custom reports and private benchmarks, depending on what's most relevant to your agency business model. We also build a co-marketing plan with your team to help the partnership reach the right customers at the right time. And then - you got it - we grow together to take over the universe! Or at least we help growing ecommerce sites reach exponential levels of growth. (Read some customer stories.) Littledata's agency partner program is highly selective, but we do try to respond to all inquiries. So if you're looking for better ecommerce analytics for your clients, please do get in touch. [subscribe]  

by Ari
2018-06-28

My first design sprint

Littledata believes that happiness and productivity go hand-in-hand, but what does that look like in practice? In this post I'll share a bit about our workplace culture and most recent design sprint, from the perspective of me, our newest team member! Four years ago a new company emerged - Littledata. Fast forward to today and we have major ecommerce customers around the world, including Made.com, Figleaves and Age UK. Our consulting business has grown to develop a suite of ecommerce analytics technology that anybody can use - including an industry-leading analytics audit, automated reporting with Google Analytics and even a dedicated Shopify reporting app. And the team has continued to expand - Meet our great team here My story I joined Littledata two months ago, and it's already been an amazing journey. I was working as a marketing specialist at a Romanian company when a friend pinged me about the opportunity to work at Littledata. I was not looking for a job at the time but I was impressed about the innovative app they had created, so I knew I had to meet them. Initially, I applied for an open position listed on Littledata's careers page. Unfortunately, my background experience in that field was not so generous and I did not get the job. (True story!) But no worries there, as Littledata saw potential in my good attitude, proactive work ethic and willingness to learn. After some additional interviews and a test project, they gave me a chance and created a new position for me as a marketing assistant. This was a clear sign of an open-minded work culture that invests in its employees and focuses as much on potential as on experience. In short, I accepted the job and joined the European team. It was one of the best professional decisions I've ever made. Since I joined Littledata I've learned more in two months than in an entire year at other companies. My colleagues and supervisor took time and patience to teach me and guide me through skills that otherwise I couldn’t have learned by myself. Littledata is a data company - and Google Analytics isn’t easy stuff - but since we’re dedicated to making analytics as painless and as useful as possible to our customers, it’s an exciting and exhilarating place to work. There are new challenges and great successes every single day in the office. Besides the best mentorship I am receiving, my peers proved to be very fun and sociable. It’s a place where we do work as a TEAM, helping and supporting each other. The only competition we have is from our competitors. Moreover, the perks I got with the job with remote-working hours and annual offsites in a different countries, easily trump the perks of working at big corporations. I discovered that the fast evolution of Littledata is due to its employees. Littledata’s senior staff believes that true innovation comes from happy employees. (Want to see the data? There is statistical evidence that happiness and a positive workplace culture drive both productivity and profit.) By focusing on building a strong internal bond, offering excellent benefits and driving diversity, Littledata created a one-of-a-kind workplace environment. Things weren’t always easy tough. They’ve had their share of challenges. See how Littledata went through the challenges of developing a Shopify integration. [subscribe] Where do we work? As Littledata grew, the team expanded worldwide. Our offices are located in New York City, London and Cluj-Napoca (Romania), and we have employees and consultants in over 8 different cities. Here in Cluj, the workspace was recently renovated and each room is personalised after each employee’s personal mark. In this way, we all feel comfortable and productive at our workspace. Many times we don’t even use our office desks, preferring to work intently on our sofas and bean bag chairs, or outside in the hammocks. We might have a remote work culture, but we stay constantly connected. Our communication strategy includes Skype for official meetings and Google products (Calendar, Drive, etc) and Slack for fast chatting, collaborating and updating. To keep track of our projects we use Trello cards, where we split the team into different boards, depending on their department. We found that it’s the best way to connect all our team and not get lost in a messaging abyss despite the different time zones. My first design sprint In order to bring clarity in our roadmap and kickstart new features, we embrace the Design Sprint philosophy. A design sprint is a five-phase framework that helps answer business questions through a fast-paced prototyping and user testing. Understand (review background and user insights) Diverge (brainstorm what’s possible) Converge (rank solutions, pick one) Prototype (create a minimum viable concept) Test (validate with users) Basically, we pick a time and a place where we all gather up every three months and do some Sprint-Planning focused on a specific goal. The process helps to spark innovation and align team members under a shared vision. Through this hyper-focus, we can build better features and launch them faster. I recently joined a Design Sprint that took place in a beautiful villa on the island of Mallorca. In the first day I assisted at a short introduction from our organizer, followed-up by the schedule presentation of our 5 day sprint-design and reviews from my colleagues regarding the last Sprint. Afterwards, we separated into two groups, the product team and the marketing team. I joined the marketing team, and for the next 5 days we worked on new ways to promote Littledata by answering the needs and the common questions our customers have. After we all agreed on the most important topics to cover we split up into three teams of two people each. One team managed a new promotional video, the other took on the app’s features process and the last one worked on a customer onboarding process. I was in the app’s features team - check them out: Littledata’s features. The product team came up with a way to increase engagement in our Shopify app and started to develop an exciting new feature that we’ll be launching next quarter! On the 4th day the product team and the marketing team reunited, presented their work and ideas, and voted on each other’s ideas. The last working day was the prototype day where both teams tested their prototypes with real customers. This was an essential part of the Sprint and definitely worth doing if you’re thinking of running a Design Sprint yourself! The Sprint-Planning was also a great way for catching up with each other and spend quality time with all the team members. Our leisure time was spent in Spain, traveling and engaging in fun activities. Work hard, play hard! We even spotted one of our customer's products, Micro-scooters, in a shop window Palma's old city! Perks In my opinion, one of the biggest perks of working at Littledata is the remote-working hours. A flexible and personalized work schedule gives the employees the opportunity to balance work and personal life very efficiently. Besides, the company offers the benefit of working from home when needed. We can work from a coffee shop, a HubSpot, a park or wherever we feel like it. You can work from anywhere ... just make sure to have a good internet connection. Healthcare is also assured. No need to worry about this topic, because for employees in Romania, Littledata grants personal health insurance through our Groupama collaborators. Wellness is also supported by weekly fruit baskets, tea, coffee and other yummy snacks. Integrating all of these pieces together we create a comfy and positive environment for our employees. Workplace culture (PS we're hiring) Our growing team is opened in hiring new staff members who bring value and personality into Littledata. A strong professional background helpful, but a drive to learn is just as important - get involved and be proactive, we encourage learning in all of our activities. We look for people that are passionate, ambitious and always want to challenge themselves. Another criteria that we are fond of is respect. Our company has a strong policy in respecting its employees. As we are very diverse in culture, we coordinate to celebrate each person's holiday and major life event. And last but not least, we are fun folks. Be serious in your work but have a positive and cheerful attitude. And guess what? We are hiring! We have big plans building some awesome products. So come join us, either as an employee or as a collaborator, to create new features using the latest analytics technology. Check out our open positions here. We’d love to hear your opinion - what do you think a great workplace looks like? Leave a comment below and subscribe to our newsletter for the latest in everything analytics.

2018-06-05

Introducing Team Invites

Team invites are here! It's now easier than ever to collaborate with team members in your Littledata account. In the new digital landscape, collaboration is the mother of invention. Our new Team feature lets you easily manage additional users for your Littledata account, so that everybody on your home team - or on a particular marketing or ecommerce project - can view smart metrics and reports for your site. What's new All Littledata accounts now include team functionality. You can invite and manage team members from your Littledata admin. Here's what you can do with Team members in Littledata: Invite new team members Manage current members Respond to requests to join your team From simply sharing reports to collaborating on complex analytics projects, team invites are a straightforward way to share information and hone down on accurate data, whether you're currently in the data setup phase or focusing on making and understanding business decisions based on that data stream. Adding team members to your account helps to ensure that your colleagues can take advantage of the automated reporting you set up in Littledata to get a clear view of your online business performance. And it doesn't stop there. Team members have access to all of the features in your Littledata plan, so you can collaborate on projects such as setting up accurate tracking, benchmarking your site, and running data-driven campaigns based on buyer personas. Note that while you can have multiple team members, there can only be one account owner for each Littledata subscription -- and only the owner can use the app to make changes in GA. Team members can view audits and reports but cannot make changes to the connected Google Analytics property using the Littledata app. We automatically limit permissions in this way to ensure that the account owner has oversight on any changes to tracking and reporting. [subscribe] Benefits for users, partners and agencies Team invites aren't just for your core ecommerce team. They can be used to enhance collaboration and ensure accurate reporting on any number of projects. The benefits extend to every type of Littledata user: General users can collaborate with both internal teams and external consultants such as PPC agencies Agencies can manage customer accounts internally (as an owner) or externally (as a team member) Partners can access client website data in one streamlined tool, including benchmarks, and find ways to optimise custom report packs based on client needs Team owners can always remove member permissions at a later date, so the Team feature is ideal for growing ecommerce sites that want to control who has access to their Google Analytics data when they change agencies or move on to a different project. Your Littledata team might be composed of members from a variety of teams in your office, and that's okay. In fact, it's encouraged. Sometimes your marketing department needs a good way to collaborate with your data team, your online merchandising department or your ecommerce site developers. As Littledata offers ways to both fix your tracking and get more relevant reporting, our app often brings new teams together to make smarter decisions. Early adopters of our Team functionality have found it particularly useful for expanding the range of reports they use in Littledata. In addition to finding ways to further enhance custom dashboards and reports, sometimes a team member will notice a particularly relevant report pack that had previously been overlooked, and the metrics in that pack will end up making the biggest difference to your online revenue. How to invite new team members and manage invitations To manage team members, login to your Littledata account and go to Settings > Members. You can access the Settings menu by clicking on the gear icon on the upper right, and you'll find Members in menu bar on the left. From the Members page, you can send new invitations, manage sent invitations, and respond to requests to join your team. In addition to invites, users can request to join an existing team. When new users sign up for Littledata or current users add a new site/view to their account, they can search for your site and request to join your team. When someone requests to join your team, you'll receive a notification at your registered email. You can either accept or remove their request. Wondering how to join a current Littledata team? You can request to join an existing team when you sign up using your Google account or a supported social login (currently Facebook and Twitter). Scalability Team member functionality is the logical next step in helping to support sustainable business growth for our customers. Last year we switched to transaction-based pricing because we are dedicated to providing apps and managed services that easily scale with any online business, whether you're doing $5,000 or $250,000 per month in sales when you first get going with Littledata. Our pricing is per web property (you need a separate account for each particular Google Analytics view or data source), not per user. Standard and higher plans include unlimited team members, but if you need a unique team setup or multi-site dashboard, let us know. We hope you love the new Team feature as much as our team does here at Littledata!

by Ari
2018-03-23

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