How to get complete ReCharge data in Google Analytics [ebook]

It's hard enough for Shopify stores to get accurate sales and marketing data. And if you're selling by subscription, this can seem even more complicated. In fact, 88% of Shopify stores have Google Analytics setup incorrectly, leading to a throughput of less than 90% (for every 100 orders in Shopify, 12 or more go missing in GA). I hate to break it to you, but for subscription merchants the reality is even harsher. Many brands can't even segment out first-time purchases from recurring orders, let alone tie them back to marketing campaigns! Luckily there's now a better way. Top subscription brands use modern data stacks to get the data they need to make informed decisions. This means understanding your checkout flow, yes, but also product lists, subscription bundles, discounts, returns, subscription lifecycle behavior, and top marketing channels for higher LTV customers. In this new ebook on ReCharge analytics, we show you how to do just that -- no developer skills needed! Free ebook on ReCharge analytics best practices Subscription analytics are a beast, and too many brands make one of these three common mistakes: Procrastination. "We know we have a data problem but will fix it next quarter...year...never..."The wrong tools. "We bought a fancy new dashboard, that will solve everything, right?" or "We bought this subscription analytics tool that works really well for SaaS companies. Why isn't it working well for ecommerce?"Completely manual approach. "Excel is my full-time job. I don't have time for data-driven growth." Top brands use modern data tools to tame the beast of analytics. In this new ebook, you'll learn how to get the data you need to accelerate growth. See how to automatically capture data at every turn: Track one-off orders and first-time subscriptionsTrack recurring payments and tie them back to the original marketing channelCalculate customer lifetime value ("CLV" or "LTV") and build more valuable cohortsCapture subscription lifecycle events like "Subscription updated"Get accurate marketing attributionUltimately make better decisions for your store Download the free ebook >>> Learn more about what you can track with Littledata's ReCharge connection. [tip]Advanced users can also now send data directly to Segment (and any connected data warehouse, email marketing platform or reporting tool).[/tip]

by Ari
2021-04-15

For every 100 orders in Shopify, 12 go missing

If you’re using Shopify’s default Google Analytics tracking you might have noticed that the revenue in Google Analytics never matches what you see in the Shopify dashboard. This is a big problem: missing orders means orders that can’t be attributed to marketing campaigns, whether those channels are paid or organic. Littledata’s improved Google Analytics app for Shopify increases order throughput to Google Analytics from worse than 90% to better than 99.9% -- and it works automatically in the data layer. How big is the problem? We sampled a set of larger DTC brands on Shopify, together processing 50,000 orders a month through a standard Shopify checkout. Looking at a month of traffic, we compared the paid orders for these Shopify stores with the Thank You pages tracked in Google Analytics. Remarkably, only 88% of orders were tracked on average, ranging from 78% tracked in the worst store setup to 96% in the best store. That is a big loss. For every 10,000 orders processed, 1,200 were going missing. Assuming each of those customers cost $50 to acquire, that is $60,000 of marketing spend which can't be attributed to sales. Whatever the CAC for your ecommerce brand, you can’t afford to miss significant data like this about transactions, not to mention the marketing campaigns that led to those sales in the first place! For every 10,000 orders processed, 1,200 went missing Revenue aside, what about those 1,200 customers who are likely still being retargeted by abandoned checkout campaigns, even though they did complete the checkout process? There is a good case to be made for remarketing to your best customers for upsells, cross-sells, referrals and more. But remarketing to your new customer base as if they never made a purchase is certainly bad business. And it gets worse. When I looked at 10 stores that have non-standard checkout setups, using apps such as ReCharge or CartHook, the percentage of orders tracked (excluding recurring orders) ranged from a pathetic 9% up to a disappointing 70%. Shopify’s order tracking relies on customers seeing the Shopify Thank You page, and many other checkouts do not immediately redirect there. What are the main reasons for missing transactions in Google Analytics? Littledata has had five years of experience debugging GA tracking, so at this point we’ve pretty much seen it all. In fact, it's the most common question our sales team hears: why doesn't my data in Shopify match my data in Google Analytics? The ecommerce ecosystem is constantly evolving, including headless setups and subscriptions in the Shopify checkout. But some things remain the same. The most common problem areas for disappearing orders are: 1. Users not waiting for the Thank You page to load Many tech-savvy buyers know that your store will email them an order confirmation, so if they’re in a hurry - and the thank you page takes a few seconds - why should they wait? This is especially true with payment gateways like PayPal, which have their own payment confirmation page. 2. Thank you page overloaded with marketing tags Most order tracking relies on a script to fire on the thank you page, and if your store has lots of these scripts then it could take 10+ seconds before the crucial Google Analytics script is run. Customers won’t wait 10 seconds to see a page which has no value for them. 3. Draft orders paid at a later date Does your store create draft orders? This is more common for B2B stores, and means the order is completed well after the customer web session finishes. That means no thank you page, so no way to track the orders in a standard GA implementation. 4. Third-party checkouts That Thank You page on Shopify may never appear at all if your store uses third-party checkouts. 5. Recurring orders Like paid draft orders, recurring orders are payments that happen outside of the customer’s web session. The user never goes through a checkout or sees the thank you page. 6. Duplicate tracking Refreshing the order confirmation page, or clicking through on an order confirmation email to view the page again, might cause another transaction event to be fired from the page. [tip]Get the free ebook about why Shopify doesn't match Google Analytics[/tip] How is Littledata’s tracking different? Littledata offers server-side order tracking, hooking into the order creation in Shopify after the payment has been made. That allows us to track draft orders paid after the event, recurring orders, and orders through channels like Amazon that don’t use the Shopify Checkout. It also allows us to add refunds back in real-time, so you can track net sales against marketing channels. Littledata de-duplicates all orders, so an order is only ever reported once - giving a 100% match with what is in Shopify admin. Server-side tracking ensures complete analytics If you want to compare like-for-like, as I did for this article, our app also sends a ‘Thank you page’ event (in the same way the order tracking done in Shopify’s standard setup). This event can also be used to trigger Google Tag Manager tags, using the built-in GTM data layer. Interested in improving your Google Analytics setup? You might be interested in 6 common reasons why GA is not accurate and how Littledata’s Google Analytics app works. [subscribe]

2021-04-08

Replacing Additional Google Analytics JavaScript for Shopify stores

On 1st March 2021 Shopify is permanently removing scripts added in the ‘Additional Google Analytics JavaScript’ preference. This field has been hidden for some time, but was previously used to inject all kinds of additional scripts into the checkout pages. Why is Shopify removing these additional scripts? Primarily they represent a security risk: injecting key-stroke-tracking scripts into checkout pages is a common way to steal credit card information. Shopify just can’t take the risk that if the store admin gets hacked, so could the customer card details. Additionally, being able to customise the Shopify checkout pages (via the checkout.liquid file) is a key feature of Shopify Plus and so a reason for stores to upgrade to Plus. How to replace Google Analytics code added in this Additional JavaScript field I know many stores were using this preference for exactly the reason it intended: to modify the functionality of the Universal Analytics tracking script Shopify adds, if configured in the online store preferences. The good news is that the scripts you need to run (excluding the checkout) can be added in the theme <head>. You can add settings or events to GA’s command queue, which get executed when the Universal Analytics (GA) library is ready. You need to add this line of code before any additional commands below, to ensure that: If the ga function is defined already, calls to ga() are queued If the ga function is not yet defined, calls to ga() are added to a new queue [dm_code_snippet background="yes" background-mobile="yes" slim="yes" bg-color="#abb8c3" theme="light" language="javascript" wrapped="yes" copy-text="Copy Code" copy-confirmed="Copied"] window.ga=window.ga||function(){(ga.q=ga.q||[]).push(arguments)};ga.l=+new Date; [/dm_code_snippet] Shopify Plus stores can do the same thing on checkout.liquid to customise Google Analytics tracking on the checkout pages. Here are some of the common uses of Additional JavaScript, and alternatives I know of: 1. Anonymising IP address GDPR regulation in Europe requires stores not to send full IP addresses to Google’s servers in the US. You can opt out in GA by using this - but it will NOT affect pageviews sent from the checkout. [dm_code_snippet background="yes" background-mobile="yes" slim="yes" bg-color="#abb8c3" theme="light" language="javascript" wrapped="yes" copy-text="Copy Code" copy-confirmed="Copied"] ga('set', 'anonymizeIp', true); [/dm_code_snippet] 2. Tracking checkout steps To measure how far users get in the checkout, and with what products, many stores want to track checkout steps in GA. Shopify does track pageviews and some events from the checkout (not including product values), but unfortunately you can no longer add a script on Shopify’s checkout. However, Littledata’s app has a more robust solution to send checkout step events and pageviews from our servers. Tracking the checkout steps across all checkouts, including third party checkouts on ReCharge and CartHook, enables stores to retarget abandoned checkouts with Google Ads and understand how shipping and payment options affect checkout conversion. 3. Cross-domain linking Shopify already accepts incoming cross-domain tracking, but to add cross-domain tracking to links from your Shopify store you need to instruct GA to automatically decorate links: [dm_code_snippet background="yes" background-mobile="yes" slim="yes" bg-color="#abb8c3" theme="light" language="javascript" wrapped="yes" copy-text="Copy Code" copy-confirmed="Copied"] ga('linker:autoLink', ['yourblog.com']); [/dm_code_snippet] For more examples on when you need to set up cross-domain linking (for example, to third-party checkouts), see our cross-domain Shopify tracking guide. 4. Tracking logged-in users To enable a registered users view in Google Analytics you need to send a customer ID when known. The window-scope object `__st` includes that `cid` field, when the user is logged in. [dm_code_snippet background="yes" background-mobile="yes" slim="yes" bg-color="#abb8c3" theme="light" language="javascript" wrapped="yes" copy-text="Copy Code" copy-confirmed="Copied"] if(__st["cid"]) ga('set', '&uid', __st["cid"]); [/dm_code_snippet] 5. Tracking additional events You may want to trigger additional GA events, like clicks on a particular button. I’d recommend you set these up using Google Tag Manager, but you can also run a SEND command at any stage and it will send to the GA tracker Shopify loads on the page. [dm_code_snippet background="yes" background-mobile="yes" slim="yes" bg-color="#abb8c3" theme="light" language="javascript" wrapped="yes"] ga('send', 'event', 'List Filter', 'Change size filter', 'XL'); [/dm_code_snippet] 6. Tracking additional web properties Many stores need multiple tracking IDs to send data to multiple web properties, and Shopify by default only allows a single property.  I’d again recommend you set these up using Google Tag Manager, but you can also run a CREATE command in your head to track to additional properties. [dm_code_snippet background="yes" background-mobile="yes" slim="yes" bg-color="#abb8c3" theme="light" language="javascript" wrapped="yes" copy-text="Copy Code" copy-confirmed="Copied"] ga('create', 'UA-XXXXXXXX-X', 'auto'); [/dm_code_snippet] 7. Adding GTM triggers If you are using Google Tag Manager to fire other marketing tags you might have used the Additional JavaScript to run triggers - for example when customers completed an order. This could be replaced by using Littledata’s GTM data layer, which is included with our Google Analytics app.  The final result Assuming you just need items 1 and 4 from the list above, this is how the script tag in your liquid theme might look: [dm_code_snippet background="yes" background-mobile="yes" slim="yes" bg-color="#abb8c3" theme="light" language="html" wrapped="yes" copy-text="Copy Code" copy-confirmed="Copied"] <head> … <script> // Scripts moved from Additional Google Analytics JavaScript preferences window.ga=window.ga||function(){(ga.q=ga.q||[]).push(arguments)};ga.l=+new Date; ga('set', 'anonymizeIp', true); if(__st["cid"]) ga('set', '&uid', __st["cid"]); </script> </head> [/dm_code_snippet] Is there anything else your store has added? Let me know and we can add it to the list.

2021-02-22

What's new in v2 of our Shopify source for Segment

We've a built a loyal following for our Shopify to Segment connection, and this month we've rolled out the next version, v2, with new events and enhanced functionality. As Shopify and Segment both continue to see unprecedented growth, Littledata is here to ensure accurate data at every ecommerce touchpoint. We've seen a surge in DTC and CPG brands on Shopify Plus that rely on Segment to coordinate customer data across marketing, product, and analytics tools. We have continued to develop our Segment integration to fit all of these use cases. [note]If you installed Littledata's Segment connection previously, please contact us to add the v2 events.[/note] About Segment v1 Last year, we worked with Segment to create a robust Shopify source for Segment users. The aim was to make everyone's job easier, from CTOs to ecommerce managers. Littledata's Segment connection v1: Captures all customer touchpoints on your store, both pre and post checkout Sends data to any of Segment’s hundreds of destinations Works seamlessly with Google Analytics Uses a combination of client-side and server-side tracking to capture browsing activity, orders and refunds Sends user fields for calculating customer lifetime value [subscribe] What's new in Segment v2 Since we launched the first Shopify app for Segment in May 2019, we have continued to make improvements based on user feedback and new use cases. The latest version of our Shopify source for Segment offers several updates and enhancements, including support for email marketing around order fulfilment events; tracking for a range of new order and payment events, including POS orders and order cancellations; and alias calls to support additional analytics destinations such as Mixpanel and Kissmetrics. Fulfilment status Many of our customers use Segment events to trigger transactional emails on platforms like Klaviyo and Iterable. One key email that stores want to customize is the 'Your order has shipped' fulfilment email, and so we now trigger a Fulfilment Update event when the fulfilment status of an order changes. This event includes status, tracking_numbers and tracking_urls (where the shipping integration allows), so the transactional email can include actionable details for the end user. These events can also be used in analytics destinations to look at fulfilment trends by product, or see how marketing campaigns around shipping match real-world delivery times. Support for email marketing Email marketing destinations such as Klaviyo, Iterable, and Hubspot, cannot use an anonymous identifier -- so our Segment connection now sends an email property with all events (when it is known), usually from checkout step 2 onwards. Where the email is captured on landing pages (e.g. popup forms) we also send this with the Product Viewed and Product Added events, to make it easier for you to run retargeting and engagement campaigns. Support for Kissmetrics & Mixpanel destinations To support seamless customer tracking in analytics destinations such as Mixpanel, Vero and Kissmetrics, Segment requires an extra alias call. Littledata ensures the pre-checkout anonymousId is added as an alias of the userId (used from checkout step 2 onwards). Learn more in our developer docs. Customer account creation On Shopify, every checkout (even as a guest) creates a customer record. This was already passed on to Segment with an Identify call and a Customer Created event. However, it is useful to know when this customer creates a password and creates a verified account with the store. For example, some brands use this event to trigger welcome emails or offer discounts. With Segment v2, we now send a Customer Enabled event when the user has confirmed their email address and created a Shopify customer account, with verified_email set as true. Payment of draft orders Some stores (especially B2B brands and wholesalers) create draft orders which are later paid. From November 2020, Littledata's Segment connection triggers an Order Completed event whenever these draft orders are paid, linking them back to the user session when they were created. POS orders Previously POS (point-of-sale) orders were excluded from Order Completed, as this polluted the revenue attribution in Google Analytics or other Segment destinations. However, as Shopify POS and other POS orders have become more popular, we now send a separate POS Order Placed event, so you can track the POS orders and choose whether to add them to your web orders. Payment failure After a customer goes through your checkout and completes an order, there is still a chance the payment fails, usually due to fraud checks. A new Payment Failure event allows you to track these failures, and see if they are more associated with particular marketing campaigns, geographies, products, or other factors. Order cancellations If the admin has cancelled an order, perhaps due to the product being unavailable, an Order Cancelled event is now triggered (including the cancel_reason). This is useful for both tracking/analysis and re-engagement campaigns. Product properties Last, but certainly not least, we've expanded the range of product properties sent with every product for better segmentation. Details such as shopify_variant_id, category and brand are sent with all client-side events and most server-side events. For more information, read our developer docs or schedule a demo today with an analytics expert.

2020-11-04

Going headless while keeping your Shopify Plus stack

It seems like everyone's considering going headless lately. What do you need to know before you make the leap? This year, in addition to optimizing Littledata for Shopify Plus (including headless Shopify setups), we have extended our headless tracking to include ReCharge and Segment in addition to Google Analytics. And we have collaborated with Nacelle as our preferred tech partner for headless builds. Led by CEO Brian Anderson, Nacelle has raised around $4.8M in funding so far, including angel investment from Shopify and Klaviyo execs. A growing number of successful online brands seeking to go headless are using Nacelle for the build and Netlify for deployment, and it's been great to see remarkable performance improvements with shared customers like Ballsy, who saw a 28% conversion rate increase across the board after moving to a headless Nacelle setup with Littledata for analytics. So we were excited to contribute some ideas to the new Nacelle ebook on how to get the headless experience without overhauling your Shopify Plus tech stack. If you are using Shopify Plus (or planning a migration), we highly recommend downloading the free guide and sharing with your team internally -- as well as any external partners like ecommerce agencies and growth consultants. In the free guide, you’ll learn: How a headless PWA works in combination with top solutions including Shopify Plus, email, SMS marketing, reviews and user-generated content, affiliate marketing, subscriptions, analytics, and customer service What industry leaders in these respective categories have to say about going headless and enhancing functionality (including Littledata for analytics and some of our long-term partners like ReCharge for subscriptions and Refersion for affiliate sales) Real-world examples of merchant success To learn more, download the free guide from Nacelle. What about headless tracking? At Littledata, we do not see headless ecommerce as a passing fad. PWA tech has caught up to the needs of larger DTC brands, who want best-in-class technology at each customer touch point (eg. social microsites, one-click subscriptions, multi-currency payments, upsell funnels) alongside custom design and a deep cross-device user experience to match their brand story. As Nacelle explains, headless ecommerce now offers the possibility of not just integrating your current tools but actually improving the functionality of your Shopify Plus stack. Together we can build a shopping experience that is better, faster, more reliable, and more highly personalized. But without server-side tracking, getting accurate data about your headless Shopify setup can be extremely complicated. Check out our headless tracking demo to see how to automatically get complete sales and marketing data about your headless Shopify site in Segment or Google Analytics.

by Ari
2020-10-13

Join our virtual Shopify Meetup on July 15th

What are you doing on 15 July? Asking us Shopify questions, that's what! Join Littledata, CartHook and Electric Eye for a Shopify expert roundtable. This summer has seen virtual events galore for the Shopify world, and we really like the AMA (Ask Me Anything) format. So Littledata is excited to join our friends at CartHook and Electric Eye for a virtual Shopify meetup on July 15. It will be a Shopify expert roundtable with the option to submit questions in advance, and plenty of time to chat. At this meetup, the panel of Shopify experts—consisting of Jordan Gal of CartHook, Chase Clymer of Electric Eye and Honest Ecommerce, and our own Ari Messer—will answer questions asked by attendees. At the request of past Meetup attendees, the event will be held during the workday (so yes you can practically be paid to attend!). [tip]Have a question for the panel? Submit your questions online here.[/tip] Event details When: 1:30pm ET on 15 July 2020 Where: Zoom! Who: Ari Messer (Littledata) and Jordan Gal (CartHook), hosted by Chase Clymer (Electric Eye) Sponsored by Shopify and Klarna You can register for the event here About Shopify Meetups Shopify Meetups are hosted by Shopify Experts to share knowledge with the growing Shopify enthusiast community. This also includes those who work predominantly on Shopify Plus. The meetings are free and open to everyone. Education and value is the focus of these Meetups, with each event featuring speakers and offering networking opportunities. Attendees range from seasoned ecommerce experts to budding entrepreneurs. What to ask Really any Shopify questions are fair game. Actually, scratch that, anything about ecommerce in general is good too! Interested in ecommerce trends during COVID? We've got the data. Wondering how to choose the most important metrics for your store? Ask away. Looking for more technical details about how Shopify, CartHook and Littledata work (together or apart)? Now's your chance to dive in deep. How to register You can register for the event here. It's a free online event and anyone can register. See you then!

by Nico
2020-06-29

Lunch with Littledata: Q&A with Anshey Bhatia, CEO of Verbal+Visual

This week, we're continuing our Q&A segment: Lunch with Littledata! We sat down (virtually) with Anshey Bhatia, founder and CEO of Verbal+Visual, to chat about the Shopify world, good design, and where things are going. V+V is one of our fantastic agency partners here at Littledata. They work closely with thoughtful brands that are dedicated to a seamless, user-centric experience on Shopify Plus. We share a number of customers with the agency and it was great to catch up during these crazy -- but also inspirational -- times here in NYC. Let's dive right in! Q: How has COVID-19 impacted your clients overall? Have they seen a boom in orders or AOV, or has order volume been normal? Our clients with higher cost per units for non-home items have been much more affected than everyone else. While no client has seen a major boom, only one client has seen a significant loss, and they are a high-ticket, night-on-the-town apparel company that launched in February. All in all, while there was a slight dip for most in March, ecommerce rebounded quickly. Q: How has V+V adapted to the pandemic era? We have taken on some new client work that is smaller in scope than our typical projects. We’ve done this to help the immediate needs of brands that were not positioned to adapt to the acceleration of e-commerce shopping that we’ve seen. When we saw the need for smaller development projects that could save brands thousands of dollars a day in lost sales, we realized it’s more efficient to solve those short term problems before addressing a full site redesign. We saw the need for smaller development projects that could save brands thousands of dollars a day in lost sales Harley Finkelstein, the COO of Shopify, recently referred to Shopify as a “Retail Operating System”, and we agree with that definition. Our agency is not just building ecommerce websites; we create the infrastructure needed for a brand to scale across many different online and offline channels. [note]Wondering how Littledata has adapted? Here's what we're doing in response to the crisis.[/note] Q: If you were going to start a DTC brand right now, what would it sell? We partner with brands that are mission-driven and are thoughtful about their supply chains and materials. We also love working with brands focused on other mission-driven areas such as health and wellness, and empowerment / equality initiatives. With that in mind, we would start a DTC brand that sources non-perishable ingredients from local restaurants and merchants. Restaurants have come up with inventive ways to sell food and other products while their establishments are shut down, so bringing locally sourced products like sauces, spices, and seasonings to a larger audience is a huge opportunity. For example, Bread makers have seen the second largest increase in purchases from March 2019 to March 2020 as a result of COVID-19, and I have a feeling our team could design a pretty kick-ass bread maker! Q: Sounds delicious! So you're a group of ecommerce design experts — visual design, experience design, etc. What's the most challenging part of creating great design experiences for businesses running on Shopify? Two important issues come to mind. Firstly, brands always want experiential sites, however they also want high conversion rates and AOV. The two don’t always go well together. It’s important that while going through the design process, the tightrope between brand equity and conversion focus is walked across gently and that we don’t go too far in either direction at the risk of losing the other. This is not endemic to Shopify necessarily, however most brands that are on Shopify care deeply about their brand. Secondly, all ecommerce sites need to be accessible to everyone, everywhere. We need to design sites with accessibility as a priority, as it’s not only the law, it’s the right thing to do. The trick is retaining a unique experience, ensuring shoppability, and allowing equal access, all at the same time. Q: What are some underrated elements of great ecommerce design that merchants should pay more attention to? We spend a lot of time thinking about the design elements that are not immediately noticeable. A lot of the new brands we see have certain elements that are trendy or in line with an agency’s signature style. For us, we focus our energies on creating scalable design systems that will bend but not break as a company grows their enterprise. Sometimes that means we have to question the brand’s assumptions and really dig into their brand identity. It’s not always clear and then our job becomes designing a set of guidelines that can not only be applied to the digital experience, but elsewhere. While we don’t specifically focus on branding, it’s important that we understand the fundamental building blocks of the brands’ visual identity, so that we can bring that brand to life across digital touch points. We also pay attention to interactions, animations, and page transitions. These animations are not always noticeable and sometimes they are designed to be that way. If a PDP is image-heavy by design, we’ll create loading animations for those images, with the understanding that it will take a little longer to load some of those images as users scroll down the page. Q: What's your advice for merchants who may not realize that a great shopper experience is stalling their growth? A lot of brands are selling a great product, they’re creating compelling ads on Facebook and Instagram which tells the story of the brand. Then potential customers click on those ads and end up on a site that does not align with the touch points they’ve had with the brand so far. A digital experience that doesn’t align with the brand’s identity will immediately reduce trust between the customer and the brand. It’s important to have a seamless customer journey from delivering ads, to the website, to emails and even into the receipt of the packages. If parts of the customer experience don’t feel connected, you are more likely to lose your customer or lose their potential LTV. Q: How does ecommerce look different for standard Shopify stores vs. Shopify Plus stores right now? There are so many new brands appearing in different verticals right now. Shopify does a great job of giving brands the tools to get off the ground and running. However, when brands need to start to differentiate themselves, they break out of the templated design that Shopify is best for. From a design perspective, you can accomplish pretty much anything you want on a Shopify store all the way up to a Shopify Plus store. Shopify Plus stores, though, are able to elevate the holistic digital experience to another level. Shopify Plus offers significantly more functionality for brands that are going international and are expanding via physical retail or other channels. Shopify Plus is built to provide an entire commerce infrastructure, while Shopify is built for a starter level e-commerce experience. Shopify Plus also offers white glove customer service, which is hugely important for brands serious about their long term growth. Q: Is omnichannel selling a thing of the past? On the contrary, omnichannel is the future of commerce. Some people think of omnichannel as the relationship between offline and online shopping. We view omnichannel as any touch point your customer can buy at. COVID-19 has accelerated the adoption of ecommerce, but ecommerce still sits at under 30% of total commerce. While most first-time ecommerce shoppers are going to large marketplaces like Amazon, Target, and Walmart, many of them are also exploring DTC brands for the first time. Brands are looking to shift to big marketplaces while also experimenting with new channels like TikTok and mobile gaming platforms. Additionally, we’re seeing traditionally offline businesses like restaurants looking for additional revenue streams. Shopify’s updates for Shopify POS have addressed the short term safety issues surrounding COVID-19, and we believe these updates will also help to improve the dynamic between online and offline, and make more shoppers comfortable with the idea of omnichannel. Ultimately, brands want to be where their customers are. We don’t always know what channels are going to be popular, but we do know all brands need a strong digital infrastructure in place to adapt and scale. Q: How crucial is it for Shopify Plus merchants to trust their tracking? In other words, how important is accurate Shopify tracking and reporting to a store's success? We use data to drive our design process, inform the user experience, and our ecommerce strategy recommendations. As mentioned before, one of the main problems we see with brands is the misalignment between their marketing campaigns, creative content, their website, and the unboxing experience. We use data to drive our design process and inform the user experience It’s critical for us to know where customers are coming from, how they are converting, how much they are spending, and their lifetime value. This not only helps our clients’ marketing efforts, but it allows their ecommerce team to make informed decisions. We can understand what changes need to be made to landing pages, PDPs, and path to purchase, and we can attribute customers to the correct marketing channels so that teams can align around shared goals. Accurate Shopify reporting ultimately leads to clarity around ownership of the data and accountability, so we can’t stress enough the importance of being able to read and interpret these data points.   Thanks again to Anshey and the Verbal+Visual team for hanging out with us online. Looking for more Lunch with Littledata? Last month we sat down with Chad Rubin, CEO of Skubana (and a Shopify seller too!).

by Ari
2020-06-16

Everything you need to know from Shopify Reunite 2020

This time last year, we were enjoying a beautiful spring in Toronto, chock-full of new announcements for Shopify sellers around the world. But this year, COVID-19 had other plans. [note]Here's everything Shopify announced and updated from Unite 2019[/note] While we would have loved to be in Toronto, hats off to Shopify for making the most of a "lost" event. By restructuring and rebranding Shopify Unite to Shopify Reunite and taking the event virtual, Shopify has actually reached more sellers, agencies, partners and dev teams than by holding the event in-person. More than 100,000 people in the Shopify ecosystem attended the event! With our top-rated Google Analytics app for Shopify adding new features and updates and ourSegment app gaining popularity in the app store (it's the only recommended Segment app for Shopify) our eyes and ears were open wide for this year's slate of announcements! [tip]Here's what's new in our Shopify apps for Google Analytics and Segment[/tip] We chatted with our agency partners to get feedback about which announcements might have the biggest impact on their business, from design and development to growth marketing for Shopify Plus stores. Here are six major updates: [subscribe heading="Top Google Analytics app for Shopify" button_text="Learn More" button_link="https://www.littledata.io/connections/shopify"] 1) Shopify Plus galore! Shopify Plus Admin upgrades New admin helps merchants expand into new countries, products, or brands by launching new stores Merchants can also copy existing data (i.e. themes, users, already-installed apps from existing stores) Offers a more complete overview of store performance COVID-friendly automation templates for Shopify Plus Automate ecommerce workflows and marketing campaigns across apps From Littledata: trace every order back to its original marketing channel with accurate attribution in Google Analytics New Flow and Scripts templates let sellers customize checkouts, automate tasks and build product promotions easily New templates for automation include: Shopify Flow templates specific to COVID-19 Shopify Scripts templates to optimize the checkout experience Shopify Flow Connectors to connect with tools like Launchpad, ReConvert, and Omnisend [tip]Did you know we launched the first Shopify Flow connector for Google Analytics?[/tip] Page activity Merchants can now see who else is working on the same product as you. If someone is currently editing a product page (or saves changes), you won't lose your place since everyone working on the page will be notified [tip]Littledata's enterprise plans are optimized for Shopify Plus[/tip] Storefront renderer Infrastructure upgrade to accelerate site speed Changes the way Shopify serves read requests Better server-side performance 2) New finance tools Shopify Capital Shopify gave away more than $1B in cash advances to merchants this year Extended financing availability beyond US (to Canada and UK stores) Shop Pay Installments Shoppers can now pay in installments (via "buy now, pay later"): 4 equal payments, interest-free, no additional fees Littledata also integrates with Sezzle, another popular "buy now, pay later" solution Shopify saw an 18% conversion rate increase and higher AOV from the added payment flexibility, especially during the economic stress brought on by COVID-19 Shop Pay installments will launch later this year in the US and all merchants currently using Shopify Payments are eligible [note]Easily track your Shop Pay / Shopify Payments data in Google Analytics[/note] Shopify Balance Includes a banking account offering faster access to funds Includes a Shopify Card (either physical or virtual) so businesses can spend flexibly Features a rewards program for everyday spending (Shopify apps, marketing, shipping) [subscribe heading="Top Google Analytics app for Shopify Plus" button_text="Learn More" button_link="https://www.littledata.io/connections/shopifyplus"] What about custom checkouts? For Shopify Plus, new custom checkout features include: Online tipping Cross-border duties Curbside pickup Local delivery settings [tip]Track every checkout step, sale and refund in Google Analytics[/tip] 3) Borderless ecommerce Cross-border domains for international selling Offers a localized shopping and checkout experience for international customers Tailor the currency and language based on customers' buying location [tip]Get accurate multi-currency tracking and better support for Shopify and Shopify Plus[/tip] Custom FX Merchants can set a price for each currency they sell in No more worrying about fluctuating exchange rates Merchants can advertise more effectively with Google Ads and Facebook Ads in every customers' local currency 4) Greater customer reach Shopify POS Better online customer experience at every touchpoint—"the most versatile and scalable POS we've ever built" says Shopify Creates room for popular fulfillment options: local pickup, delivery, or shipping Merchants can search for inventory across locations, set retail-specific staff permissions Local pickup Local delivery Google Shopping Merchants can now list their products with Google Shopping for free via Shopify's Google Shopping app (available only in USD for now) Shop app First-of-its-kind native shopping app developed by Shopify Already more than 16 million users 5) Ecommerce infrastructure Sections (beta) Merchants can now edit sections on all pages, not just homepage, plus drag and drop apps anywhere on their online store Currently in Partner Beta Product states Products now differentiated in draft, active or archive so merchants can filter and organize products by state more easily In other words, products can be saved as unpublished and worked on later 6) Fulfillment updates Shopify Fulfillment Network (SFN) Once this news broke last year, we watched Twitter run wild as store managers imagined the possibilities with Shopify's brand new Fulfillment Network. Designed to compete with the world's top fulfillment networks (Amazon, USPS, etc.), the network will be built across the United States at first before (hopefully) expanding across the Atlantic. Shopify will be pumping over a billion dollars into this infrastructure, expanding and improving the network. Now, in 2020, that expansion and improvement has arrived: Inventory intelligence: Shopify will make recommendations as to which inventory should be stored where so that it's close to customers More brand control: Branded packaging and marketing inserts More data control: better customer insights Simple integration: Shopify will install and help set up the Shopify Fulfillment app for you Same-day fulfillment: Orders received by 4 p.m. EST will be shipped out the same day As mentioned at Unite 2019, SFN will also support the following: Multiple channels: online store, retail, Instagram, eBay, Amazon, etc. Returns and exchanges Custom (branded) packaging Stores of all sizes: "shipping 10 to 10,000 products a day", aiming to get this to "3 to 30,000" per day in coming years Is there anything we missed? Let us know! Next up, Ed and Ari will break down the announcements and unpack what they mean for Shopify Partners, agencies, and for teams that rely on Littledata's smart connections for better marketing attribution and decision-making. Stay tuned!   Photo credits: Littledata, Shopify

by Nico
2020-05-20

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