Littledata featured in new Shopify App Store collection

Happy 2021! We are excited to announce that Littledata's Google Analytics app for Shopify stores is featured in a new Shopify App Store collection called Plan for what's next. As ecommerce continues to scale at lightning speed, planning for growth (and how to beat the rising tides of DTC competition) is on everyone's mind this year, so we couldn't be happier with the timing for this app store promotion. Google Analytics by Littledata is one of the top-reviewed apps in the app store. Benefits include: Complete sales trackingMarketing attributionAdvanced tracking for apps like ReCharge and CartHookCustom dimensions for tracking payment gateways and customer lifetime value (LTV)Own the data in Google Analytics The Shopify App Store ecosystem has grown quite a bit since we launched our first Shopify app there in 2017, and it's always nice to be promoted internally by Shopify to reach even more merchants that could benefit from complete ecommerce analytics. The app store has evolved, but it's still all about apps that work well together, whether you're selling by subscription or going headless. If you're serious about data-driven growth, it's time to give Littledata a try. Start a 30-day free trial today and say hello to accurate data. View the new collection in the Shopify App Store >>> Learn more On Shopify Plus? Running multiple country stores? Learn more about Littledata's plans and pricingExplore Littledata's connections with other popular Shopify apps, including ReCharge, Bold and CartHook (plus automatic integrations like Klaviyo)Read technical documentation on Littledata's GTM and Google Analytics data layer for Shopify stores

by Ari
2021-01-13

Product update: Shopify Order Names

We are pleased to announce a product update for how Littledata tracks unique identifiers for Shopify orders. Previously Littledata passed orders from Shopify to Google Analytics (or Segment) using only the order number (Order ID). Shopify offers the ability to add a prefix or suffix to this number to create an order name, and we now support Shopify Order Name tracking in addition to Shopify Order ID tracking. You can now choose between tracking either the Shopify Order ID or Shopify Order Name, and Order Name tracking is the default for new installs. Read on to see what's changed, and why we made the shift. What was the problem with tracking order numbers? There is nothing wrong with tracking order numbers per se, but for some Shopify stores -- especially larger brands on Shopify Plus -- it's often more useful to track the complete order name, which includes a particular prefix or suffix. Brands running multiple Shopify stores in local currencies often want to analyze total sales across geographic operations, while also segmenting by individual stores. This is useful whether or not you are using a rollup property for data analysis. With only order number tracking, there were two options: The largest brands, running GA 360, could set up a different web property for each store and then a 'rollup property' for all the stores. This option is expensive.The brand could send all the web orders to one GA web property, and then create filtered views based on the hostname the order was made on. But this didn't work for non-Shopify checkouts, such as ReCharge, where the hostname did not vary by store. So Littledata built a third option, order name tracking, which makes it easier to track multi-currency sales in GA and other data destinations, and also ensures no clashes with order numbers from non-Shopify systems. How to change the order ID format for your Shopify store Shopify and Shoify Plus merchants can change their Shopify order numbers to include a particular prefix and/or suffix. If you want to make this change, go to Shopify Admin > Settings > General > Standards and formats. Here you can configure a prefix or a suffix to every order, unique for that store. While you can't change the order number itself, you can add this default info to make it easier to see and segment your orders. For example, if you are selling in the US and the UK, you might want to add country-type prefix to your orders, such as 'US' and 'UK' to those country stores. Then your orders will come through with order names such as 'US1792' and 'UK1793'. [subscribe] How to enable Order ID or Order Name tracking in Segment or Google Analytics Shopify Order Name tracking is now the default. So if you installed Littledata after 19th October 2020, then you will already be using order names. This applies to both our Segment connection and our Google Analytics connection in the Shopify App Store. [note]If you installed Littledata after 19th October 2020, then we will be tracking the Shopify Order Name by default. You can change this in your Littledata Settings.[/note] If you installed Littledata before 19th October 2020, we will be tracking Shopify Order ID by default. You can check which unique order identifier we're using for your store, and make any necessary changes, directly in the Littledata admin. Go to Settings > General on the bottom leftUnder Unique identifier for all orders, select either "Shopify Order ID" or "Shopify Order Name"Click Save We will then pass the order information in your chosen format. How to use the data in Google Analytics Order identifiers offer a broad range of reporting and analysis possibilities in Google Analytics and connected analytics dashboards. Here's the ecommerce Sales Performance report showing orders including the prefix appearing in Google Analytics. If you are operating multiple country stores and using Littledata for multi-currency tracking, you will see different prefixes here for each currency. You can also create a segment including only orders with that prefix, by filtering by Transaction ID. What's next We are constantly enhancing Littledata's functionality. This year we have introduced a range of general updates and a new version of our Shopify to Segment connection. If you are setting up a raw data pipeline, we also now offer a Measurement Protocol connection for use with a range of ETLs, data collection platforms (like Snowplow) and data warehouses (like Google BigQuery). Check out our release notes to stay up to date, and don't forget to browse the complete documentation in our help center.

2020-12-09

Why doesn't Shopify match Google Analytics? [webinar]

Have plans this Thursday? Join me, Tamas Hanko, in a new webinar about why Shopify data doesn't always match Google Analytics -- and how to fix this. In this free webinar on Thursday, November 19th, hosted by our partners at Prisync, we will dive deep into the waters of Shopify and Google Analytics, and look at how to make this data play well together to power your ecommerce sales and marketing. There are lots of reasons why Shopify and GA might have a mismatch, and we'll run through the common ones plus a few outliers. Every site is unique, but there are common setup and tracking issues, especially with Shopify's checkout. In this free presentation, you will learn: Common issues with making Shopify data match Google Analytics dataUnderstanding the differences in how metrics are calculated in Analytics and ShopifyWhat server-side tracking can (and can't) do to help fix these issues Reserve your free spot today Can't make the live webinar? Sign up anyway and we'll send you a recording after the session. You can also check out Littledata's free ebook on Shopify and Google Analytics.

2020-11-16

What's new in v2 of our Shopify source for Segment

We've a built a loyal following for our Shopify to Segment connection, and this month we've rolled out the next version, v2, with new events and enhanced functionality. As Shopify and Segment both continue to see unprecedented growth, Littledata is here to ensure accurate data at every ecommerce touchpoint. We've seen a surge in DTC and CPG brands on Shopify Plus that rely on Segment to coordinate customer data across marketing, product, and analytics tools. We have continued to develop our Segment integration to fit all of these use cases. [note]If you installed Littledata's Segment connection previously, please contact us to add the v2 events.[/note] About Segment v1 Last year, we worked with Segment to create a robust Shopify source for Segment users. The aim was to make everyone's job easier, from CTOs to ecommerce managers. Littledata's Segment connection v1: Captures all customer touchpoints on your store, both pre and post checkout Sends data to any of Segment’s hundreds of destinations Works seamlessly with Google Analytics Uses a combination of client-side and server-side tracking to capture browsing activity, orders and refunds Sends user fields for calculating customer lifetime value [subscribe] What's new in Segment v2 Since we launched the first Shopify app for Segment in May 2019, we have continued to make improvements based on user feedback and new use cases. The latest version of our Shopify source for Segment offers several updates and enhancements, including support for email marketing around order fulfilment events; tracking for a range of new order and payment events, including POS orders and order cancellations; and alias calls to support additional analytics destinations such as Mixpanel and Kissmetrics. Fulfilment status Many of our customers use Segment events to trigger transactional emails on platforms like Klaviyo and Iterable. One key email that stores want to customize is the 'Your order has shipped' fulfilment email, and so we now trigger a Fulfilment Update event when the fulfilment status of an order changes. This event includes status, tracking_numbers and tracking_urls (where the shipping integration allows), so the transactional email can include actionable details for the end user. These events can also be used in analytics destinations to look at fulfilment trends by product, or see how marketing campaigns around shipping match real-world delivery times. Support for email marketing Email marketing destinations such as Klaviyo, Iterable, and Hubspot, cannot use an anonymous identifier -- so our Segment connection now sends an email property with all events (when it is known), usually from checkout step 2 onwards. Where the email is captured on landing pages (e.g. popup forms) we also send this with the Product Viewed and Product Added events, to make it easier for you to run retargeting and engagement campaigns. Support for Kissmetrics & Mixpanel destinations To support seamless customer tracking in analytics destinations such as Mixpanel, Vero and Kissmetrics, Segment requires an extra alias call. Littledata ensures the pre-checkout anonymousId is added as an alias of the userId (used from checkout step 2 onwards). Learn more in our developer docs. Customer account creation On Shopify, every checkout (even as a guest) creates a customer record. This was already passed on to Segment with an Identify call and a Customer Created event. However, it is useful to know when this customer creates a password and creates a verified account with the store. For example, some brands use this event to trigger welcome emails or offer discounts. With Segment v2, we now send a Customer Enabled event when the user has confirmed their email address and created a Shopify customer account, with verified_email set as true. Payment of draft orders Some stores (especially B2B brands and wholesalers) create draft orders which are later paid. From November 2020, Littledata's Segment connection triggers an Order Completed event whenever these draft orders are paid, linking them back to the user session when they were created. POS orders Previously POS (point-of-sale) orders were excluded from Order Completed, as this polluted the revenue attribution in Google Analytics or other Segment destinations. However, as Shopify POS and other POS orders have become more popular, we now send a separate POS Order Placed event, so you can track the POS orders and choose whether to add them to your web orders. Payment failure After a customer goes through your checkout and completes an order, there is still a chance the payment fails, usually due to fraud checks. A new Payment Failure event allows you to track these failures, and see if they are more associated with particular marketing campaigns, geographies, products, or other factors. Order cancellations If the admin has cancelled an order, perhaps due to the product being unavailable, an Order Cancelled event is now triggered (including the cancel_reason). This is useful for both tracking/analysis and re-engagement campaigns. Product properties Last, but certainly not least, we've expanded the range of product properties sent with every product for better segmentation. Details such as shopify_variant_id, category and brand are sent with all client-side events and most server-side events. For more information, read our developer docs or schedule a demo today with an analytics expert.

2020-11-04

Going headless while keeping your Shopify Plus stack

It seems like everyone's considering going headless lately. What do you need to know before you make the leap? This year, in addition to optimizing Littledata for Shopify Plus (including headless Shopify setups), we have extended our headless tracking to include ReCharge and Segment in addition to Google Analytics. And we have collaborated with Nacelle as our preferred tech partner for headless builds. Led by CEO Brian Anderson, Nacelle has raised around $4.8M in funding so far, including angel investment from Shopify and Klaviyo execs. A growing number of successful online brands seeking to go headless are using Nacelle for the build and Netlify for deployment, and it's been great to see remarkable performance improvements with shared customers like Ballsy, who saw a 28% conversion rate increase across the board after moving to a headless Nacelle setup with Littledata for analytics. So we were excited to contribute some ideas to the new Nacelle ebook on how to get the headless experience without overhauling your Shopify Plus tech stack. If you are using Shopify Plus (or planning a migration), we highly recommend downloading the free guide and sharing with your team internally -- as well as any external partners like ecommerce agencies and growth consultants. In the free guide, you’ll learn: How a headless PWA works in combination with top solutions including Shopify Plus, email, SMS marketing, reviews and user-generated content, affiliate marketing, subscriptions, analytics, and customer serviceWhat industry leaders in these respective categories have to say about going headless and enhancing functionality (including Littledata for analytics and some of our long-term partners like ReCharge for subscriptions and Refersion for affiliate sales)Real-world examples of merchant success To learn more, download the free guide from Nacelle. What about headless tracking? At Littledata, we do not see headless ecommerce as a passing fad. PWA tech has caught up to the needs of larger DTC brands, who want best-in-class technology at each customer touch point (eg. social microsites, one-click subscriptions, multi-currency payments, upsell funnels) alongside custom design and a deep cross-device user experience to match their brand story. As Nacelle explains, headless ecommerce now offers the possibility of not just integrating your current tools but actually improving the functionality of your Shopify Plus stack. Together we can build a shopping experience that is better, faster, more reliable, and more highly personalized. But without server-side tracking, getting accurate data about your headless Shopify setup can be extremely complicated. Check out our headless tracking demo to see how to automatically get complete sales and marketing data about your headless Shopify site in Segment or Google Analytics.

by Ari
2020-10-13

Why does shop.app appear as a referral source in Google Analytics?

You may have noticed a new referral source appearing in your Google Analytics, or an increase in sales from the 'Referral' channel. This is a change Shopify made with the launch of the new Shop app, and can be easily fixed. What is Shop.app? SHOP by Shopify is a consumer mobile app, aggregating products and experiences from many Shopify merchants. It is heavily integrated with ShopPay, and so Shopify is now directing one-click checkout traffic to the shop.app domain instead of pay.shopify.com. How would SHOP fit into the user journey? There are two scenarios: 1. Customer is using Shop.app for checkout and payment Example journey: User clicks on Facebook Ad Lands on myshop.myshopify.com?utm_source=facebook Selects a product Logged in, and directed to shop.app for checkout Returns to myshop.myshopify.com for order confirmation In this scenario we should exclude shop.app as a referrer, as the original source of the order is really Facebook 2. End customer is using Shop.app for browsing / product discovery Example journey: User discovers product on shop.app Clicks product link to myshop.myshopify.com?utm_source=shop_app Logged in, and directed to shop.app for checkout Returns to myshop.myshopify.com for order confirmation Here, shop.app is the referrer but it will show up with UTM source How do I see the true source of the referral in Google Analytics? Firstly, you need to exclude shop.app as a referral source. Only in scenario 2 is SHOP genuinely a source of customers, and there the UTM source tag will ensure it appears as a referrer. Littledata's latest tracking script sets this up automatically. The second fix is harder. Unfortunately, at the time of writing, Shopify only sets utm_source=shop_app in the URL query parameters in scenario 2, and Google Analytics won't consider this a referral unless utm_medium is also set. So it appears under the (not set) channel. I've written a patch for our tracking script so that we set utm_medium as referral if only the source is specified, but you can also edit the default channel grouping in GA so that shop_app is grouped as a referral. Thirdly, you want to differentiate orders going through shop.app from the normal Shopify checkout. Littledata's Shopify app does this by translating the order tag shop_app into the transaction affiliation in Google Analytics, so the affiliation is Shopify, Shop App. Conclusion So if you're a Littledata customer: our app has got you covered. And if not there's a few changes you'll need to make in Google Analytics settings to make sure shop.app traffic is treated correctly.

2020-09-22

The growing Polish ecommerce market

What does the future of ecommerce look like in Poland? This week, I was honored to be invited onto a panel discussing ‘Riding the Wave of Ecommerce into the Future’ as part of the Ecommerce Trends Summit. Organized by MIT Sloan Management Institute Polska and the ICAN Institute, the summit offered a timely forum about ecommerce for a country rapidly undergoing digital transformation. As with all countries, Poland has seen a massive shift online post-Covid, and predominantly offline companies are scrambling to catch up with online-first retailers. These laggards were behind on use of modern ecommerce platforms like Shopify, but are now catching up fast as they understand the true cost of maintaining an excellent web channel. Since Shopify launched local language versions of their store admin in 2019 it has been a more popular choice for Europe-based companies, and Shopify is now heavily marketing in France, Germany and other countries. Many brands are extending across these markets, and at Littledata we've built multi-currency tracking into our main SaaS product for Shopify merchants. In the Shopify world, each country site is a separate-but-connected "country store" for localized shopping and payments. I’d expect more Polish companies to migrate to Shopify or other cloud solutions (WooCommerce, BigCommerce, etc) in the near future. The larger brands will likely choose Shopify Plus. [note]See the ecommerce trends we've identified during the COVID-19 crisis[/note] The other themes of the panel were more general to retailers globally: stores need smarter marketing, better personalization and a more unique sales proposition as competition heats up. In addition, Amazon.de (Amazon Germany) is just as big a threat to individual brands as elsewhere, but that makes it just as important for stores to own their own customer channel and direct brand experience. And that means running their own online store. Let’s hope Littledata gets to do more business with Polish ecommerce sites soon! [tip]Book Littledata CEO Edward Upton as an expert ecommerce speaker at your next online event[/tip]

2020-09-11

Lunch with Littledata: Q&A with Casey Armstrong, CMO at ShipBob

This week, we're continuing our Q&A segment: Lunch with Littledata! We recently caught up with Casey Armstrong, CMO at ShipBob, to chat about the Shopify world, fulfillment, decision-making during COVID, Shopify analytics, and more. ShipBob is a tech-enabled 3PL that fulfills ecommerce orders for DTC brands; their mission is to make Shopify stores feel more successful online by providing reliable fulfillment solutions, warehouses near customers to help transit times, shipping costs, and the overall delivery experience. ShipBob also has a strong Shopify integration. [tip]Check out Littledata's top-rated Shopify app for Google Analytics -- with advanced tracking for Shopify Plus[/tip] Let's dive right in! Q: Has ShipBob’s core market changed during the crisis? Our core market has not changed since the COVID-19 pandemic started, but our core market has grown considerably. The reliance on selling direct-to-consumer and ecommerce has been steadily increasing year-over-year and now everybody who was hesitant or putting it off has to adapt immediately. "The reliance on selling direct-to-consumer has been steadily increasing" In addition, buyers are creating habits and becoming more comfortable buying online. This will impact retail forever. There is no going back to the percentage of retail occurring offline in the US. Q: Are you still seeing a big uptick in AOV when customers migrate to using ShipBob's fulfillment solution? This varies greatly by merchant, but by offering free shipping, fast shipping, or fast and free shipping, we have seen merchants see increases in AOV from 17% and up to 98% in extreme cases. Q: If you were personally to start an ecommerce business in North America right now, what would you sell? Happiness :) Q: What's the most common misconception ecommerce businesses have about fulfillment, or just 3PL solutions in general? The biggest misconception is that they have to be doing a lot of volume. That is not the case. In fact, ShipBob was built to democratize fulfillment for all ecommerce merchants. We have customers that are doing 50 shipments per month and customers that are doing well over 50,000 shipments per month. They both have access to the same fulfillment center network, run by the same warehouse management system, and they see everything in the same merchant application. Plus, we charge $0 for all of our software, including all integrations and our analytics tools. Q: Are a number of your Shopify merchants selling by subscription? Which apps are they using? Yes, we have a lot of merchants utilizing subscription offerings, so they can increase customer LTV and have a more predictable revenue stream. The most common applications we see now are ReCharge and Bold Subscriptions. [tip]See how you can track your subscription data with complete accuracy.[/tip] Q: Any tips for merchants who might be new to ecommerce? Know your numbers: COGS, customer acquisition costs, and fulfillment costs. Sounds basic, but if you don’t know your numbers, you can't efficiently scale your business or know which levers to focus on!   Quick links Littledata's partner program for Shopify Plus agencies and tech partners Free ebooks about how to improve Shopify analytics Headless Shopify tracking with Littledata

by Ari
2020-08-20

Try the top-rated Google Analytics app for Shopify stores

Get a 30-day free trial of Littledata for Google Analytics or Segment