ReCharge integration for subscription analytics

We're excited to announce that Littledata's Shopify app now integrates seamlessly with ReCharge! The integration makes it easy to get an accurate data stream about your ReCharge subscriptions in Google Analytics. What is ReCharge? ReCharge is the most popular recurring billing solution for Shopify stores. It lets you easily sell subscriptions on a Shopify store. ReCharge has a robust feature set for stores selling physical products on subscription, allowing for single product, mixed cart & entire cart subscriptions. The app powers thousands of stores processing tens of thousands of orders daily, including Littledata customers like Tiege Hanley skin care and BIOHM probiotics. Until we built this new integration, ReCharge customers didn't have a way to get a complete data collection in Google Analytics without hiring expensive GA consultants. How the integration works Integrating Littledata with ReCharge lets you capture data about the entire subscriber journey, from marketing campaigns to first-time payments and recurring revenue. The integration uses Littledata's magic sauce to connect Shopify and ReCharge data to Google Analytics. The reporting includes essential information for understanding business performance: End-to-end Google Analytics tracking for the subscriber journey Marketing attribution for subscription revenue, including first-time payments and recurring charges Segmentation by payment source, subscription plan type and product category With this integration plus the power of Littledata's analytics audit tool, you ensure accurate tracking of everything in your ecommerce funnel. You can then take advantage of automated reporting to help you increase revenue, including report packs built specifically for subscription analytics. Littledata's revenue optimisation tools pull directly from your GA data. Advanced users can can also use that data directly in GA - and connect it to dashboard tools like Data Studio and Supermetrics. And the price is right! Littledata provides Google Analytics for ReCharge stores at no extra cost. It's a free integration for any Shopify store using both apps! [subscribe] Setup guide For the Littledata - ReCharge integration to work, you need to install both apps for your Shopify store, then connect them by activating the integration. Install ReCharge Install Littledata’s Shopify app Follow these steps to activate the integration Note that you will activate ReCharge’s basic Google Analytics integration as part of the setup process, but you need to complete the Littledata integration to get full marketing attribution and to track recurring subscriptions (not just first-time payments). For more information about how our ReCharge integration works, check out our knowledge base. If you’re looking for custom setup or help with reporting, consider one of Littledata’s enterprise plans. Higher-tier plans include a dedicated account manager and support from analytics experts. We have many happy ReCharge customers, so please get in touch if you have any special requests!   This post was updated in June 2018

by Ari
2017-06-05

How to add account edit permissions for Google Analytics

Being able to edit the Google Analytics account is the 2nd highest permission level. You need this if you want to create a new web property in Google Analytics. To grant permissions to another user you will need the highest permission level yourself: being able to manage users on the account. [subscribe] Step 1: Go to account user settings page First click the admin cog in any view under the account in GA you want to change, and then in the left hand list go to User Settings   EITHER Select an existing user from the list and click the 'edit' checkbox OR Add a new user's email (must be a Google account) and check the 'edit' checkbox. Step 3: Check it's working Your colleague should now be able to see 'Create new property' under the list of properties in the middle of the Admin page.

2017-05-16

Shopify Marketing Events vs Google Analytics

At the Shopify Unite conference today I heard plenty of great ideas such as ShopifyPay but the most interesting for me as a data specialist was the marketing events API. Since we launched our Fix Google Analytics Shopify app earlier this year we’ve known that reporting was a weak spot in Shopify’s platform offering, and they admit that ‘understanding marketing campaign performance’ is one of the biggest challenges of Shopify merchants right now. The ability for other Shopify apps to plug their campaign cost and attribution data into Shopify (via the marketing events API) is a logical step to building Shopify’s own analytics capability, but I don’t believe it will be a substitute for Google Analytics (GA) anytime soon. Here’s why: 1. Google Analytics is the industry standard Every online marketer has used Google Analytics, and many have favourite reports they’ve learned to interpret. Moving them to use a whole new analysis platform will take time– and it’s taken GA 10 years to achieve that dominance. 2. GA provides platform-agnostic data collection For a store using Shopify as their only source of insights, moving away from Shopify would mean losing all the historic marketing performance data – so it would be very hard to make like-for-like comparisons between the old platform and the new. Many of our customers have used GA during and after a platform shift to get continuous historical data. Which ties into my first point that over 85% of businesses have a history of data in GA. 3. Incomplete marketing tagging will still cause issues Making valid analysis on multi-channel marketing performance relies on having ALL the campaigns captured - which is why our GA audit tool checks for completeness of campaign tagging. Shopify’s tracking relies on the same ‘utm_campaign’ parameters as GA, and campaigns that are not properly tagged at the time cannot be altered retrospectively. [subscribe] 4. Google is rapidly developing Google Analytics I’d like to see the Shopify marketing event collection evolve from its launch yesterday, but Google already has a team of hundreds working on Google Analytics, and it seems unlikely that Shopify will be able to dedicate resources to keep up with the functionality that power users need. 5. More integrations are needed for full campaign coverage Shopify’s marketing analysis will only be available for apps that upgrade to using the new API.  Marketing Events has launched with integrations for Mailchimp and Facebook (via Kit) but it won’t cover many of the major channels (other emails, AdWords, DoubleClick for Publishers) that stores use. Those integrations will get built in time, but until then any attribution will be skewed. 6. GA has many third-party integrations Our experience is that any store interested in their campaign attribution quickly wants more custom analysis or cuts of the data. Being able to export the data into Littledata’s custom reports (or Google Sheets or Excel) is a popular feature – and right now Shopify lacks a reporting API to provide the same customisations. You can only pull raw event data back out. That said, there are flaws with how GA attribution works. Importing campaign cost data is difficult and time consuming in GA – apart from the seamless integration with AdWords – and as a result hardly any of the stores we monitor do so. If Shopify can encourage those costs to be imported along with the campaign dates, then the return on investment calculations will be much easier for merchants. I also think Shopify has taken the right pragmatic approach to attribution windows. It counts a campaign as ‘assisting’ the sale if it happens within 30 days of the campaign, and also whether it was ‘last click’ or ‘first click’. I’ve never seen a good reason to get more complicated than that with multi-channel reports in GA, and it’s unlikely that many customers remember a campaign longer than 30 days ago. In conclusion, we love that Shopify is starting to take marketing attribution seriously, and we look forward to helping improve the marketing events feature from its launch yesterday, but we recommend anyone with a serious interest in their marketing performance sticks to Google Analytics in the meantime (and use our Shopify app to do so).

2017-04-21

How to track recurring billing & subscriptions

Recurring billing & subscriptions have proved to be, at least in the last few years, the most viable model of business. The return on investment, value per customer and frequency of buying are all higher for any business that adopted a recurring subscription model. This article is focused on Shopify stores that use apps like ReCharge solution and Fix Google Analytics - Littledata app. Nonetheless, everything in here can be applied to all recurring payments business models. Recharge is the most used Shopify recurring billing solution powering thousands of stores and processing tens of thousands of orders daily. Fix Google Analytics - Littledata app completes ReCharge app by providing accurate sales attribution through Google Analytics. If you don't know what the Fix Google Analytics - Littledata app does, here is a short description: We fix your data collection, offer marketing insights and suggest improvements all in one app. Say goodbye to inaccurate data and start getting the full Enhanced Ecommerce experience. [subscribe] Install this app to get: Proper marketing attribution in Google Analytics Product views and shopping behavior Checkout conversion funnels (including voucher usage) Understanding of repeat buyers The first steps to install the Google Analytics tracking for Shopify are illustrated here: How to install the “Fix Google Analytics” Shopify app. Besides this, if you want to go ahead and make an advanced analysis of your customers then you need to make the following setup also: Enable the feature in Google Analytics Firstly, go into Google Analytics (both your normal Google Analytics property and the property that has been created by Littledata) and enable the User-ID feature by going to Admin > Property > Tracking info > User-ID. Click On, next, On, next, give the new view a name and you're done. Attention: The new view will start to collect data from the point of creation so you will need to wait a bit to use this report. The sources of the purchases will be collected from the point of creation so most of the orders will be shown in the first month from direct / (none). Enable the Enhanced Ecommerce feature in Google Analytics Go in Google Analytics, Click Admin. In the right side under view choose the new Registered Users view, that you've created earlier and click Ecommerce Setings. Toggle to ON and then click Next step. Toggle ON for Enhanced Ecommerce, save and you're done. How to see what was the initial source for recurring subscriptions? Using the registered view go under ACQUISITION -> All traffic -> Source/Medium or Channels. This report will show both new customers and recurring ones. We need to apply a segment to this report in order to show only the recurring users. This is how you set up the segment to exclude first time buyers: Now, with the above segment applied, you can check what was the original source or the sale for all transactions from repeating buyers. The other cool and helpful report is the AUDIENCE->Cohort Analysis report. You can see what was the retention of these users in this report for each day, week or month. This report must be read from left to right for the bellow image: Users that bought in December continued to buy in January in a proportion of 38% and in February in a proportion of only 10%. Combining this report with an advanced segment that excludes the first-time buyers AND includes only buyers that had their first transaction in December will provide the number of users that started the subscription package in December and what was the retention of these people. We would love to hear how you use these reports and what you think of the new version of our Fix Google Analytics - Littledata app.

2017-03-22

Why do I need Google Analytics with Shopify?

If the lack of consistency between Shopify’s dashboards and the audience numbers in Google Analytics is confusing, you might conclude that it’s safer to trust Shopify. There is a problem with the reliability of transaction volumes in Google Analytics (something which can be fixed with Littledata’s app) - but using Shopify’s reports alone to guide your marketing is ignoring the power that has led Google Analytics to become over by over 80% of large retailers. Last-click attribution Let’s imagine your shoe store runs a Google AdWords campaign for ‘blue suede shoes’. Shopify allows you to see how many visits or sales were attributed to that particular campaign, by looking at UTM ‘blue suede shoes’. However, this is only capturing those visitors who clicked on the advert and in the same web session, purchased the product. So if the visitor, in fact, went off to check prices elsewhere, or was just researching the product options, and comes back a few hours later to buy they won’t be attributed to that campaign. The campaign reports in Shopify are all-or-nothing – the campaign or channel sending the ‘last-click’ is credited with 100% of the sale, and any other previous campaigns the same customer saw is given nothing. Multi-channel attribution Google Analytics, by contrast, has the ability for multi-channel attribution. You can choose an ‘attribution model’ (such as giving all campaigns before a purchase equal credit) and see how much one campaign contributed to overall sales. Most online marketing can now be divided into ‘prospecting’ and ‘retargeting’; the former is to introduce the brand to a new audience, and the latter is to deliberately retarget ads at an engaged audience. Prospecting ads – and Google AdWords or Facebook Ads are often used that way – will usually not be the last click, and so will be under-rated in the standard Shopify reports. So why not just use the analytics reports directly in Google AdWords, Facebook Business, Twitter Ads etc.? Consistent comparison The problem is that all these different tools (and especially Facebook) have different ways of attributing sales to their platform – usually being as generous as possible to their own adverting platform. You need a single view, where you can compare the contribution of each traffic source – including organic search, marketing emails and referrals from other sites – in a consistent way. Unfortunately, Google Analytics needs some special setup to do that for Shopify. For example, if the customer is redirected via a payment gateway or a 3D secure page before completing the transaction then the sale will be attributed to a ‘referral’ from the bank - not the original campaign. Return on Advertising Spend (ROAS) Once you iron out the marketing attribution glitches using our app, you can make meaningful decisions about whether a particular form of marketing is driving more revenue that it is costing you – whether there is a positive Return on Advertising Spend. The advertising cost is automatically imported when you link Adwords to Google Analytics, but for other sources, you will need to upload cost data manually or use a tool like funnel.io . Then Google Analytics uniquely allows you to decide if a particular campaign is bringing more revenue than it is costing and, on a relative basis, where are the best channels to deploy your budget. Conclusion Shopify’s dashboards give you a simple daily overview of sales and products sold, but if you are spending more than hundreds of dollars a month on online advertising – or investing in SEO tactics – you need a more sophisticated way to measure success. Want more information on how we will help improve your Shopify analytics? Get in touch with our experts! Interested in joining the list to start a free trial? Sign up! Get Social! Follow us on LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook and keep up-to-date with our Google Analytics insights.

2016-12-07

Top 5 Google Analytics metrics Shopify stores can use to improve conversion

Stop using vanity metrics to measure your website's performance! The pros are using 5 detailed metrics in the customer conversion journey to measure and improve. Pageviews or time-on-site are bad ways to measure visitor engagement. Your visitors could view a lot of pages, yet be unable to find the right product, or seem to spend a long time on site, but be confused about the shipping rates. Here are the 5 better metrics, and how they help you improve your Shopify store: 1. Product list click-through rate Of the products viewed in a list or category page, how many click through to see the product details? Products need good images, naming and pricing to even get considered by your visitors. If a product has a low click-through rate, relative to other products in the list, then you know either the image, title or price is wrong. Like-wise, products with very high list click-through, but low purchases, may be hidden gems that you could promote on your homepage and recommended lists to increase revenue. If traffic from a particular campaign or keyword has a low click-through rate overall, then the marketing message may be a bad match with the products offered – similar to having a high bounce rate. 2. Add-to-cart rate Of the product details viewed, how many products were added to the cart? If visitors to your store normally land straight on the product details page, or you have a low number of SKUs, then the add-to-cart rate is more useful. A low add-to-cart rate could be caused by uncompetitive pricing, a weak product description, or issues with the detailed features of the product. Obviously, it will also drop if you have limited variants (sizes or colours) in stock. Again, it’s worth looking at whether particular marketing campaigns have lower add-to-cart rates, as it means that particular audience just isn’t interested in your product. 3. Cart to Checkout rate Number of checkout processes started, divided by the number of sessions where a product is added to cart A low rate may indicate that customers are shopping around for products – they add to cart, but then go to check a similar product on another site. It could also mean customers are unclear about shipping or return options before they decide to pay. Is the rate especially low for customers from a particular country, or products with unusual shipping costs? 4. Checkout conversion rate Number of visitors paying for their cart, divided by those that start the process Shopify provides a standard checkout process, optimised for ease of transaction, but the conversion rate can still vary between sites, depending on payment options and desire. Put simply: if your product is a must-have, customers will jump through any hoops to complete the checkout. Yet for impulse purchases, or luxury items, any tiny flaws in the checkout experience will reduce conversion. Is the checkout conversion worse for particular geographies? It could be that shipping or payment options are worrying users. Does using an order coupon or voucher at checkout increase the conversion rate? With Littledata’s app you can split out the checkout steps to decide if the issue is shipping or payment. 5. Refund rate Percent of transactions refunded Refunds are a growing issue for all ecommerce but especially fashion retail. You legally have to honour refunds, but are you taking them into account in your marketing analysis? If your refund rate is high, and you base your return on advertising spend on gross sales (before refunds), then you risk burning cash on promoting to customers who just return the product. The refund rate is also essential for merchandising: aside from quality issues, was an often-refunded product badly described or promoted on the site, leading to false expectations? Conclusion If you’re not finding it easy to get a clear picture of these 5 steps, we're in the process of developing Littledata’s new Shopify app. You can join the list to be the first to get a free trial! We ensure all of the above metrics are accurate in Google Analytics, and the outliers can then be analysed in our Pro reports. You can also benchmark your store performance against stores in similar sectors, to decide if there are tweaks to the store template or promotions you need to make. Have more questions? Comment below or get in touch with our lovely team of Google Analytics experts!   Get Social! Follow us on LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook and keep up-to-date with our Google Analytics insights.

2016-11-30

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