Top 5 pitfalls in tracking ecommerce in Google Analytics

We all need our Google Analytics data to be correct and realistic. Ecommerce, just like any other website, needs correct data. What makes ecommerce websites more open to error is the ecommerce data capturing. We have put together a list of 5 mistakes in a Google Analytics integration that you should check before starting reporting on your online store! Top 5 pitfalls in tracking ecommerce in Google Analytics Tracking code is missing from some pages Multiple page views sent Multi- and subdomain tracking issues Wrong usage of UTM parameters Wrong usage of filters   Tracking code is missing from some pages The easy way for an established website to see if the tracking is complete is to go to Google Analytics > Acquisition > Referrals and search the report for the name of your website, as shown below. If you have a lot of pages and are not sure how to find which exact pages are missing the code, you can use the GA Checker.   Multiple page views sent The second most common issue we found is having multiple Google Analytics scripts on the same page. The easiest way to check this is with the Tag Assistant extension from chrome. Go on your website and inspect the page (see image below). You can also use the GA Checker for this. The solution is to leave only one script on the page. There are situations where you're sending data through Google Tag Manager. If you see 2 pageviews in Tag Assistant or gachecker.com, you should take a look at your tags. There should be only one for pageview tracking!   Multi- and Subdomain Tracking Issues Are you seeing sales attributed to your own website? Or your payment gateway? Then you have a cross-domain issue. And you can read all about it in our blog post: Why do you need cross-domain tracking?. You can see if this is the case by going to Acquisition > Overview > Source/Medium and find your domain name or payment provider.   Wrong usage of UTM parameters You should never tag your internal links with UTM parameters. If you do so every time a clients click's on a UTM tagged link, a new session and the original source will be overwritten. Pay attention to your campaign sources and search if something suspicious appears in the list. You'll find, you have internal links tagged when you will try to find the source of your transactions and find the name of the UTM parameters from your website instead. Read what UTM's are and why you should use them in our blog post: Why should you tag your campaigns?.   Wrong usage of filters Using filters will improve the accuracy of your data, however, data manipulated by your filters cannot be undone! To prevent your filter settings or experiments to permanently alter your traffic data you should set up separate views, and leave an unfiltered view with raw data just in case. Check your filters section and be sure you know each purpose. You can check more on this blog post: Your data is wrong from gravitatedesign.com. Need help with any of these common mistakes? Get in touch and we'd be happy to help!   Get Social! Follow us on LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook and keep up-to-date with our Google Analytics insights.

2016-11-01

How to increase the product click-through rate

According to W3Techs, Google Analytics is being used by 52.9 percent of all websites on the internet, more than 10 times the next most popular analytics option, Yandex Metrics. But how do we really use the information in Google Analytics so we can increase our revenue? BuiltWith says that 69.5 percent of Quantcast’s Top 10,000 sites (based on traffic) are using Google Analytics, and 54.6 percent of the top million websites are those that it tracks. Most of the large websites use the information in Google Analytics to make strategic decisions about the product or information posted online. Ecommerce websites, in particular, have the possibility to improve their performance looking at ecommerce data available in Google Analytics. The Enhanced ecommerce tracking from Google Analytics is a complete revamp of the traditional ecommerce tracking in the sense that, it provides many more ways to collect and analyse ecommerce data. Enhanced e-commerce provides deep insight into e-commerce engagement of your users. You can read more on Google Support about what is possible with Enhance Ecommerce data. We will try to show you how you can optimise product listings using Enhance Ecommerce - the non-technical way. We assume that you already have the full ecommerce setup for Analytics in place and you already have access to data like this in your account: If you don't, it's worth going through this blog post: Set up Ecommerce tracking with Google Tag Manager. Also, before moving forward, you should generate the product listing performance reports based on the first part of this blog post: Use Enhanced Ecommerce to optimise product listings. As you've seen in the blog post mentioned above, having enhanced ecommerce data, gives you unlimited ways to react to the customer's behaviour. Starting with this graphic above, let's make a strategy to improve product listing and increase the website conversion rate. We have 3 situations First, we have the non-starters product category. These products never get clicked on within the list. Either there are incorrectly categorised, or the thumbnail / title doesn’t appeal to the audience. They need to be amended or removed. Second, we have the lucky products: quick sellers: these had an excellent add-to-cart rate, but did not get enough list clicks. Many of them were 'upsell items', and should be promoted as ‘you may also like this’. And last, poor converters: these had high click-through rates, but did not get added to cart. Either the product imaging, description or features need adjusting. We will focus on the non-starters and poor converters ones and give you a list of things to do. Non-starters As we mentioned before these products are never clicked. For these kinds of products, you should check and improve the following. Are they in the correct category? If not put adjust them! Does this product have the correct position on the category page? If is a product is important to you, don't leave it at the end of the category listing on page 100. Does this product have a picture? If yes, change it as it is clearly not performing. Is this product easy to find in the category when filters are applied? Is this product easy to find using the internal search of the website? Is this product part of an upsell or cross-sell strategy? Poor Convertors Are the pictures of this product clear and from all relevant angles? If this product is an expensive one, does it have a video showing the benefits? On this product page are there sufficient details about the product, their benefits, age limit, and so on? If this is an assembled type of product do you have the assembly e-book or mention that they will receive it with the package? Do you mention, on a scale, how hard it is to assemble this product? Do you have reviews from previous customers that describe this product? Do you make all the costs of this product clear, including VAT, shipping, and other taxes? Is your add-to-cart button on this page working? Is the flow from add-to-cart to check out a smooth one, with no errors, and no "out of stock" notice? Do you use retargeting if the client sees a product multiple times but doesn't seem to add it to the basket? If you have other suggestions for the list above fell free to send us your ideas and we will update it. If you are interested in setting up Enhanced Ecommerce to get this kind of data or need help with marketing analytics then please get in touch!   Get Social! Follow us on LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook and keep up-to-date with our Google Analytics insights.

2016-10-25

Personalising your site for a local event with Google Optimize

Google Optimize (standard edition) will be released publically at the end of October, allowing free access to powerful AB testing and personalisation features. Here’s a guide to launching your first test, assuming you have the Google Optimize 360 snippet installed on your page. Step 1: Create the experiment I want to trigger a personalisation on Littledata’s homepage, shown only to visitors from London, which promotes a local workshop we have running later this month. It’s not a real AB test, as we won’t have enough traffic to judge whether the banner is a success, but we can use the ‘experiment’ to launch this personalisation for a local audience. First, I need a new test (click the big blue plus sign) and select an AB test. I’ll name my test, and set the editor page as our homepage – which is pre-filled from Google Analytics anyway… Since I have Google Analytics linked, I can select a goal from GA as the objective. In this case, the banner will promote the event (which isn’t tracked on our site) so the only sensible goal is promoting more pageviews – but it’s possible it will also increase signups for our app, so I’ll include that as a secondary objective. Next, I need to add a variant, which is going to load my event banner. I’ve named it ‘add yellow bar’. Clicking on the variant row will take me to the editor. Step 2: Edit the ‘B’ version Note: Optimize’s editor works as a Chrome Plugin, so you’ll need to install that in Google Chrome first. It’s easy to select an element on the page to edit or hide, but my variant will load a new snippet of HTML code which is not already on the page. So I’ll select the element at the top of the page (with ID ‘content’) and then go to the select elements icon in the top left. Now I’ve got the right element to use as a building block, I’m going to add an ‘HTML’ change. And set it to insert the HTML ‘before’ the current element. I’ve pasted in the HTML I’ve recycled from another page. Once I click apply we can see the new element previewing at the top of the page. Next, let’s check it looks OK on mobile – there’s a standard list of devices I can select from. Yes, that is looking good – but if it wasn’t I could click the ‘1 change’ text in the header to edit the code. Lastly, in the editor, you may have noticed a warning notification icon in the top right of the Optimize editor. This is warning me that, since Littledata is a single-page Javascript site, the variant may not load as expected. I’m confident Optimize is still going to work fine in this case. Step 3: Launching the experiment After clicking ‘Done’ on the editor, I go back to the experiment setup. Usually, we’d split the traffic 50:50 between the original and the variant, but in this case, I want to make sure all visitors from London see the message. I’ll click on the weighting number, and then set ‘add yellow bar’ to show 99.9% of the time (I can’t make it 100%). Then, we want to set the geotargeting. The experiment is already limited to the homepage, and now I click ‘and’ to add a 2nd rule and then select ‘geo’ from the list of rules. I want the yellow bar to show only for visitors from London. The city is a standard category, and it recognised London in the autocomplete. As the final step, I need to click ‘Start Experiment’. I can’t edit the rules of any running experiments (as this would mess up the reporting), but I can stop and then copy an experiment which is incorrect. Conclusion Google Optimize makes it really simple to set up tests and personalisations, although it is missing a few features such as scheduling. The premium edition (Optimize 360) will allow more analysis of tests using Google Analytics, and also allow the import of custom audiences from other Google 360 products. This is powerful if you want to launch a customised landing pages experience based on, say, a DoubleClick display ad campaign. So try it out, and if you have any questions, contact one of our experts! Get Social! Follow us on LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook and keep up-to-date with our Google Analytics insights.

2016-10-18

New interface and workspaces in Google Tag Manager

Google Tag Manager has recently had quite a revamp to its interface. Not to mention the addition of much talked about workspaces feature. Google Tag Manager (GTM) is a great tool that saves the development and implementation time, and the new drastic changes in any of Google’s tools can be quite a shock when you’re used to one way of workflow. The latest changes to the interface are radical but as with everything else, it just takes a short while to get used to. GTM still works the same, though. There’s no change to how your tags, triggers and variables are set up. So let’s see what's changed! Overlays on top of overlays This is the biggest change in the interface! Whether you’re creating a new tag or changing an existing one, you’ll be making your updates in overlays that slide in from the right hand side of the screen. Whilst this may be confusing initially, this is a great improvement on the previous workflow. Before you had to create your variables before the tag, or if creating the tag, save the progress, then create the variable separately, and then return to the tag to add in your variable. Too many steps! The new overlay doesn’t cover the whole screen and instead, leaves a bit of space on the left so you can see where you started from. Now that I’ve embraced the workspaces, I’ve realised how great it is to be able to do changes and updates without navigating elsewhere. Icons replace colours Previously, when viewing a list of tags all the triggers were colour coded so you could quickly see types of triggers used. Now, they’re all grey with icons at the beginning. I’ve previously found the colour coding very handy in quickly determining where the tags have been set to work. I’m not convinced that the icons will do as great of a job, but like with all of the changes – just embrace them and move on. List of variables They’ve lost the ‘enabled built-in variables’ section at the top. It used to have checkboxes so you could quickly enable or disable select variables. Now you have a list of built-in variables and for any changes, you have to click ‘configure’ button and then select which ones you want or not. And of course, you’ll have to do these changes in the overlay that slides over. The variables you've created previously will be in a separate list when you scroll down the page. If you want to view the details of the variable, then you’ll have to click on the variable and see its setup in the new overlay. Remember, remember… Do you tend to forget to specify your container's name and description? Now you get reminded to do so when you click to ‘publish’ your container and haven’t set the details. Timestamps I love it when a small change can make a big difference! This is that kind of change. When hovering over any relative timestamps in the triggers, overview or other sections, you will see the exact date and time of the latest change. What are workspaces? Workspaces are multiple containers that teams and users can work on without worrying about publishing someone else’s updates that may not be ready to go live. For someone working within a number of teams, like we do, this is a very welcomed update. After using it for a few weeks, I’ve already seen improvements in the speed of publishing updates. Now, fewer people have been blocked from progressing on their tags, which is really great! So now you can make your additions or amendments in a separate space and publish them when they're ready. What really happens when you publish is that anything new in your workspace gets added to the default workspace. This may include any updates to tags, triggers, variables, and any notes you may have added. If you can, stick to making smaller sets of changes within workspaces so you have a more robust version history, allowing you to trace updates and roll back to previous versions more quickly. You’ll get 3 workspaces in total so 1 default one + 2 custom workspaces, whilst 360 accounts get unlimited workspaces. Here’s how they work. To create a separate workspace click on the ‘Default Workspace’ in the left panel. In the new overlay click on the + icon in the top right corner. Now enter the name and description for the workspace so when you choose a workspace you can quickly see what's being worked on in there, or what the purpose of the workspace is. You can always refer to these for information on what was worked on or published as part of this workspace. A new workspace will always be created based on the latest GTM version and include the latest tags, triggers, and variables. If you're publishing a workspace that has conflicting updates with another workspace, then GTM will let you know and give you the option to resolve conflicts in their very easy to use conflict resolution tool. Once you publish the non-default workspace, it will be automatically removed. Better tag management You know how GTM has a number of tag templates for the most typical tracking needs, for example, AdWords and DoubleClick. These templates are very useful for creating and maintaining tags without codes, allowing to insert only required data, and making the whole process less error-prone. Well, they've expanded their selection with additional templates from vendors such as Bing, Twitter, Hotjar, Nielsen, Yieldify and many many more. I've been setting up a number of tags from the new vendors so I'm glad to see they've finally caught up with this. Here's a full list of supported tags is available in Tag Manager's Help section.   So these are some of the most notable changes. My favourite ones are overlays, timestamps and workspaces for reasons I mentioned above. The overlays don't seem to have got much love when they were first launched, but it's definitely a step up on the previous workflow. Got strong feelings about any of the latest updates? Let me know what you love or hate in the comments below.   Get Social! Follow us on LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook and keep up-to-date with our Google Analytics insights.   Image credit: screenshot of 'conflict resolution tool' courtesy of Google Analytics Blog

2016-10-13

How to track forms which don't redirect to a thank you page

Many contact forms now use Javascript to submit and do not redirect to a new page. So to track the form, unless you trigger an event on the submit button, you need to listen for a piece of text (usually saying thank you). We have created a custom HTML script that listens to the changes in the page and triggers an event called 'formSubmitted'. This event can then be used to fire a separate tag with event details to Google Analytics. We've tested this on our contact form at Littledata and here's how you can set it up too. Step 1 The first step is to go through the contact form and see what the steps are in completing it. On ours, you just enter the information in the fields and press "SUBMIT MESSAGE". When the message is sent out, the button will say "SENT!". Here the only thing that changed was the text on the button from 'submit message' to 'sent'. We built this HTML script that listens to the changes on the page, but you'll need to change line 10 to be whatever the message is in your form. You will also need to change line 15 if you have multiple forms on the page. [code lang="js"] <script> // **** Littledata Javascript form tracker **** // Generates a GTM custom event called 'formSubmitted' // When an on-page form is submitted // CHANGE the text to match the message displayed // when the form is successfully completed // It is not case sensitive var text = "sent!" // By default it will search for text within the first form // Set to false if text is outside a form // or change to a higher false if there are multiple forms var formIndex = 0; // OPTIONALLY, restrict the search to an HTML element ID // If you leave this blank, the whole page will be searched; // this causes the script to run more slowly var targetId = "" // **** No changes needed to the script below **** text = text.toLowerCase() dataLayer = dataLayer || []; if (!formIndex && targetId.length == 0) console.error('Form tracker needs either a form or an element ID') var checkEveryMilliseconds = 500; formTrackerInterval = window.setInterval(function(){ var target = "" if (formIndex >= 0) { var form = document.getElementsByTagName('form') target = (form.length > 0) ? form[formIndex].textContent : ""; } else target = document.getElementById(targetId).textContent target = target.toLowerCase() if (target.indexOf(text) > -1) { window.clearInterval(formTrackerInterval); dataLayer.push({ event: 'formSubmitted' }) } },checkEveryMilliseconds) </script> [/code] Step 2 Now we need to add the script to listen out for when the form is submitted. Create a custom HTML tag in your GTM container. You can name the tag 'LISTENER Contact form submit event' or anything else you will remember it by. Choose the tag type 'Custom HTML'. Copy and paste your HTML/Javascript into the textbox, and remember to change the var text (line 10) with your own text. Step 3 This tag needs a firing trigger, specifying the rules when it needs to be activated. If you can, only fire on specific pages - the script will slow down the page a little, as it runs every half a second to check the form. Give the trigger a descriptive name - here I've chosen "PAGE About us" Select trigger type as 'Custom Event' and for the event name put " gtm.load ", which means this trigger at page load. We want this trigger to work on a specific page only, so the firing rule goes 'page path equals /about-us', which means that our trigger will work on the www.littledata.io/about-us page only. If you have a number of pages that have the form you're tracking, then you could use 'contains' rule and select part of the link that is applicable to all. For example, if all of your links have word 'contact' in them, then your firing rule would say 'page path contains contact'. Step 4 Now that you have your listener tag set up, you need to create a separate tag to send the event details to Google Analytics. Again, give it a descriptive name so you know what it's for - here I've used 'GA event - contact form submitted'. Select tag type as 'Universal Analytics' and in the tracking ID field, select the variable that contains your GA tracking id. For event category, action and label you have to specify the namings by which this data will be categorised in Google Analytics. Step 5 This tag needs its own trigger to know when to fire, and here you have to use the event created by the listener tag set up during steps 2-3. Here you have to specify that this tag can only fire when event 'formSubmitted' happens. I've called my trigger 'Contact form event', selected trigger type as 'custom event' and entered event name 'formSubmitted. Now you can save it and test in the debugger mode. Try submitting your contact form and see if the event 'formSubmitted' appears. You should also see the tag 'GA event - contact form submitted' fire. If everything's ok, publish the container and do a final test. Make a new form submission and check if you can see the event details come through in Google Analytics real time reports, under events. Need some help setting this up or Google Tag Manger? Why not get in touch by contacting our lovely Google Analytics experts?   Get Social! Follow us on LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook and keep up-to-date with our Google Analytics insights. Further reading: How to set up event tracking in Google Tag Manager Why should you tag your campaigns? Set up Ecommerce tracking with Google Tag Manager

2016-10-11

Google Optimize versus Optimizely

I’ve been an Optimizely certified expert for a couple of years and have now trialled Google Optimize 360 for a few months, so it seems a good time to compare how they stack up. Optimizely is the current market leader in AB testing (or content experimentation), due to its ease of use and powerful reporting tools. It gives companies an easy way to run many concurrent tests and manage their setup and roll out without the involvement of developers. That was a big step up from Google Content Experiments, where the only way to set up an experiment is to write some Javascript code. The Guardian had some success with Optimizely, where they increased subscriptions by 46%. Google Optimize is an equivalent testing tool, and has copied much of the user interface that made Optimizely popular: you can click on elements within the page to experiment, and change their style, hide them or move them. My only complaint is that the interface is so simple it can take a while to unbury powerful features, such as transform the page via a custom script. There have been many success stories of companies implementing Google 360. Technically, Optimize’s editor is a bit smoother; using a Chrome plugin avoids some of the browser security issues that bugged Optimizely (since internet browsers confused the Optimizely in-page editor with some kind of script hacking). For example, to load Littledata’s homepage in their editor I have to enable ‘insecure scripts’ in Chrome and then navigate to a different page and back to force the editor to re-render. For reporting, Google Optimize 360 gives the ability to see results either in Optimize or as a custom dimension in Google Analytics – so equivalent to Optimizely. Right now Optimize lacks some features for advanced scheduling and user permissions, but I expect those to evolve as the product gathers momentum. The critical difference is with the targeting options Optimizely allows you to target experiments based on the device accessing the page (mobile vs desktop, browser, operating system) and for enterprise plans only to target based on geolocation. The limitation is that every time Optimizely needs to decide whether to run the test, the check for the user’s location may take a few seconds – and the landing page may flicker as a test rule is triggered on not. Google Optimize can target to any audience that you can build in Google Analytics (GA). This means any information you capture in Google Analytics – the number of previous visits, the pages they have previously seen or the ecommerce transactions – can be used in a test or personalisation. For example, in Google Optimize you could serve a special message to users who have previously spent more than $100 in your store. Optimizely has no knowledge of the users’ actions before that landing page, so the only way you could run an equivalent personalisation is to expose this previous purchase value as a custom script on the landing page (or in a cookie). The beauty of Google Optimize is that you are targeting based on information already captured in Google Analytics. There is no technical setup beyond what you were already doing for Google Analytics, and it doesn’t take a developer to build targeting for a very specific audience. Pricing Optimizely starts from under $100/month, but to get access to enterprise features (e.g. for geo-targeting) you will need to spend $2000 plus per month. Google Optimize is currently being sold at a flat rate of $5000 / month for the basic tier of Google 360 customers (which have between 1M to 50M sessions per month), but in future, it could be offered at a lower price to smaller companies. Conclusion Where you’ll appreciate the benefits of Google Optimize is for running personalisations based on complex rules about previous user behaviour, or the campaigns they have seen. The more different tests you are running, the more time and simplicity saving you will get from building the audience in Google Analytics rather than some custom scripts. Google Optimize 360 is currently in beta but you can currently add your email to invite list. For smaller customers, or those with less complex needs, Optimizely still offers better value – but that might change if Google were to offer a limited version of Optimize at a lower price.   Get Social! Follow us on LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook and keep up-to-date with our Google Analytics insights.   Further reading: Create and customise dashboards and widgets in Google Analytics New in Littledata: an improved navigation, trend detection algorithm, and more How to set up internal searches in Google Analytics Image credit: Blastam  

2016-10-05

Create and customise dashboards and widgets in Google Analytics

Every view in Google Analytics comes with a default "My Dashboard". Learn how to customise your dashboards and widgets for the best account overview. Dashboards contain one or more widgets (up to 12 per dashboard) that give you an overview of the KPI’s that you care about most. Create your dashboard To create a dashboard, navigate to your view, then: Go to reporting tab. Click dashboards. Select + new dashboard. In the create dashboard pop-up select blank canvas (no widgets) or starter dashboard (default set of widgets). You can also import dashboard configurations from the solutions gallery, where is most likely that someone thought about some of the KPI’s you are interested and already build a dashboard. Give your dashboard a title, then click create dashboard. Add widgets to your dashboard A dashboard can have up to 12 instances of the following kinds of widgets <piece of information>: Metric—displays a simple numeric representation of a single selected metric. Timeline—displays a graph of the selected metric over time. You can compare this to a secondary metric. Geomap—displays a map of the selected region, with the specified metric plotted on the map. Hover over the map to see the actual metric values. Table—displays up to 2 metrics describing the selected dimension, laid out in a tabular format. Pie—displays a pie chart of the selected metric grouped by a dimension. Mouse over a slice to see the specific metric values. Bar—displays a bar chart of the selected metric grouped by up to 2 dimensions. Mouse over a slice to see the specific metric values. Difference between standard vs. real-time widgets Some of the available widgets can display their data in real-time. These widgets update the metrics automatically (standard widgets, by comparison, update when you load or refresh the dashboard). Real-time widgets can display only the active users or pageviews metrics, depending on the widget. The following widget types are available as real-time widgets: Counter—displays a count of the active users on your site. You can optionally group these users by a selected dimension. Timeline—displays a timeline graph of pageviews on your site for the past 30 to 60 minutes. Geomap—displays a map showing where your active users are coming from. Table—plots a table of your active users against up to 3 selected dimensions. How to add a widget to a dashboard: Create a new dashboard and select blank canvas, or click + add widget on an existing dashboard to open the widget editor. Select the type of widget. Configure the widget’s dimensions, metrics and other options. These vary depending on the type of widget. Scroll or use the search box to locate the specific metric or dimension you want. You can limit the data shown by the widget by clicking add a filter. Filters let you include or exclude data in the specified dimension that match your filter criteria. You can add multiple rows to your filter definition. All conditions must be met for the filter to work. Report and dashboard filters are not the same as view filters. View filters permanently change your data, while report and dashboard filters only limit the data displayed in the report or dashboard. Dashboard filters are specific to the dashboard in which you define them. You can link the widget to a report or a URL. Doing so makes the widget title a link, taking you to the specified report or web page. To link to a report, begin typing a report name. Google Analytics will autocomplete your entry, trying to match it to an existing report. Alternatively, you can copy and paste the report’s URL into this field. Enter a widget title or accept the suggested title. Click save. Add a linked report directly to your dashboard Another way to link a report to your dashboard is to add it directly from the Google Analytics reporting tool. Locate or create the report you want to see in your dashboard. Click add to dashboard below the report title. Select an existing dashboard, or create a new one by clicking new dashboard. Select the check boxes for the dashboard widgets you want to include (e.g., table, pie chart, timeline). You can add up to 2 widgets per report to your dashboard. You can change the widget titles using the click to edit links. Click add to dashboard. Your new linked report widget opens on the dashboard you selected. Use the widget title link to open the underlying report. Linked report limitations Linked reports can’t have metric filters or secondary dimensions. If you try to add a report with a metric filter or secondary dimension, you will see a warning icon. Hover over the icon to see the warning message. You can still add the report, but it will not include the filter or secondary dimension. You can only embed the data view of a report in your dashboard. If you try to add a report that uses another view of the table (e.g., percentage, performance, comparison or pivot), you will see a warning icon. Mouse over the icon to see the warning message. You can still add the report, but it will display only the data view. Linked reports display only the first two metric columns from your reports. If your report contains more than two metrics, additional metrics will not be displayed in the dashboard. Edit a widget To modify an existing widget, mouse over the widget title, then click the edit (pencil) icon. To delete an individual widget, mouse over the widget title, then click the close (X) icon. Clone a widget You can create an exact copy of a widget using the clone widget link. This is convenient when you want to use one widget as a base for another. Add segments to your dashboard In the Google Analytics reports, you can add segments to your dashboard, allowing you to compare and contrast metrics generated by different session or user groupings. To edit an existing segment, click the segment label at the top of your dashboard. To add a segment, click the empty + add segment label. You can learn more about segments. Share your dashboard with other users Dashboards are private to you until you share them. If you develop a dashboard that you think is useful to other users in your account, or to other Google Analytics users in general, you have several options for sharing it. You can also send a snapshot of your dashboard data via email or generate a PDF file you can distribute however you please. Share dashboards with the current view Once you have your private dashboard working the way you like, you can create a copy of it to share with other users. When you do this, anyone with access to this view can see the dashboard’s data and add to or edit any widgets contained in the dashboard. There’s no way to make dashboards read-only; however, changes to the shared dashboard won’t affect your private version of that dashboard. You must have edit permission to share dashboards and data with the current view. If you have only read-only permission, you can still share your private dashboard by sending it as a template link or by adding it to the solutions gallery. See below for more information. To share a dashboard with the current view: View the dashboard you want to share. Click share > share object A copy of the current dashboard will now be available to all other users in that view, located in the shared dashboards section of the reports panel. Note: to unshare the dashboard you must delete it. Share dashboard templates with other views and accounts The share > share template link option generates a URL you can copy and send to other users, embed in a document or host on a website. When you share a dashboard via a template, you share only the settings for the dashboard - you do not share any data. You can send the link to anyone with a Google Analytics account, and that person can then import the settings. Learn more about sharing customizations via templates. Share dashboards in the solutions gallery The solutions gallery lets you share and import custom reporting tools and assets, like dashboards and segments, into your Google Analytics accounts. When you share a dashboard using the share > share in solutions gallery, only the dashboard’s configuration is shared. Your personal information and Google Analytics data stay private in your account. Learn more about the solutions gallery. Send dashboards via email If you need to distribute a snapshot of your dashboard data to people who might not have access to your Google Analytics account, the share > email option is for you. You can send them a customised email with an attached PDF file showing your dashboard to any valid email account. Scheduling dashboard emails Dashboard emails can be sent as “one-offs”, or you can schedule them on a recurring basis. Use the frequency controls to select the timing of the email. By default, recurring emails will be sent for 6 months. The advanced options let you adjust this from 1 month to 1 year. After this period expires, you’ll need to set up the recurring email schedule again. Tip: If there are any previously scheduled emails, you’ll see a link allowing you to add to an existing email. This lets you send out multiple dashboards or reports using the same distribution and timing. Manage all your scheduled emails by navigating to admin > views > select your view > personal tools & assets > scheduled emails. Export dashboards to PDF The export > PDF option saves a copy of your current dashboard exactly as it appears on screen to a PDF file. You can then embed or distribute this exported view in other documents as needed. Get Social! Follow us on LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook to keep up-to-date with Google Analytics.   Further reading: Vital Google Analytics custom reports and dashboards for ecommerce Attributing goals and conversions to marketing channels Tips to optimise your ecommerce landing pages

2016-10-04

Best small business tools

Every business has their own strategies and tools to achieve goals and performance. There are millions of new apps and software being built from accounting software to simple infographic tools. We did a bit of digging and found some small business tools, we think are great and you may like as well! Intercom Intercom is a customer messaging platform, which allows companies to communicate with their clients in a way that’s ‘simple, personal, and fun for everyone’. They have a few internal tools to make communication easier, including a live chat, marketing automation, and customer support. These allow you to chat with visitors while they’re on your website so you can convert them right away, you can onboard and retain customers through emails, push and in-app messages, and customers can ask for help in your app by email or social. So Intercom has done wonders for communications! We investigated more, and they’ve done a little more... They offer books that help companies communicate better and luckily for you, you can check them out here! At Littledata, we’ve integrated Intercom into our web app to allow clients to contact us directly in their own time, and for us to send important updates. Read more about it in our blog post: New In Littledata! Xero Xero is a ‘beautiful accounting software’ that gives you a real-time view of your cashflow. It’s set up in the cloud, so you’re able to login anytime, anywhere and from any device. It’s the best way to get paid faster; you can send invoices directly to your customers online, and get updates when they’re opened. As Xero says, “it’s a small business accounting software that’s simple, smart and occasionally magical”. Here’s a wonderful and insightful video of how it works: To give you real customer feedback, Xero has a few stories that give you insights into why small business have used them. Think it’s a branding source for Xero? Nope. They’ve taken the soul of these companies and created videos to showcase thriving businesses. Some testimonials include getting up to speed on financials with no number-crunching, bringing tech and craft together, efficiency and transparency, and more. Trello Trello is an ‘easy, free, flexible, and visual way to manage’ projects and organise anything. It’s used by many companies from all over the world for many different reasons. Not only can you visualise a whole company, but you can personalise the boards to your company branding, making it your own. Through Trello boards, you can keep track of clients, assign tasks to individuals, move projects along a path, customise your approach, and more. It’s the perfect small business tool to help you visualise your progress. At Littledata, we’ve created numerous boards based on different aspects of our business from development to marketing, which allows us to work better as a team. Skype Skype is a communication application that ‘keeps the world talking, for free’. It’s a perfect small business tool to not only keep in contact internationally, but you can create group calls among team members with both internally and to remote teams. Over the past few years, Skype has evolved bringing more efficient communication to companies and individuals. You’re not only able to call Skype to Skype, but you can have group calls, call phones anywhere in the world, and trust us, at a much lower rate, and you can screen share, which simplifies training or calls. At Littledata, we currently use Skype to communicate within our London office when working remotely and to share documents, and we use it to keep up to date with our Romanian office. Through weekly meetings and constant updates, we’re able to know how to efficiently help one another and work as a team, regardless of the time zone. Meetup ‘Meetups are neighbours getting together to learn something, do something, share something...;’. It’s the world’s largest network of local groups, making it easier for anyone to organise groups based on common interests. It’s a perfect small business tool, helping people around the world organise themselves to make a difference. As a business you can create groups to showcase your product, giving potential clients a more personal contact, while taking advantage of Meetup’s vast audience. Not only can you use it for business purposes, but there are numerous creative groups from badminton, marketing analytics to cultural groups. Canva Canva empowers the world through design by giving individuals an easy-to-use program for creating beautiful designs and documents. Whether you’re using one of their professional layouts or creating one yourself, you’ll always be showing off stunning graphics, that are simply created through their drag-and-drop feature. You’re not only able to create flyers and banners, but magazine covers, CVs, business cards, and even social media graphics. Canva provides perfect sizing to make all of your designs perfect for any online profile. Not only do they give you different options, but you can add all those cool extras, such as fonts, shapes, and filters. Fireshot You can use the business tool, Fireshot to take screenshots with a few clicks. It gives you different options, including selections, entire web pages, and the visible part of a website. This tool saves time, and allows you to customise by performing quick edits, add text annotation, choose the format of the file, and there are different options to keeping the file. At Littledata, we use this strategy to take screenshots of our web app, which helps us in writing our blog posts to show our clients, and people needing Google Analytics information. It basically helps us promote ourselves! Dropbox Dropbox gives people a trustworthy and secure approach to managing their files. It ‘simplifies the way you create, share, and collaborate’. With a simple download, businesses can have access to all company files from anywhere, bringing teams together constantly. This is a great tool for small businesses as it’s inexpensive, it works with all email providers, and you have an unlimited amount of space. Zoho CRM Zoho CRM ‘empowers the teams and businesses that use it’. It offers insights into running your business, an easy-to-use program, and a solution to processes. It combines good practices, smart choices, and ideal situations into a customised business tool. This business tool is great for small businesses who want to keep track of their sales and manage their client relationships. It allows for custom layouts that make it easy to tailor different approaches to getting more leads or accounts. For the amount of flexibility, Zoho CRM is inexpensive and their customer support is great in helping determine the perfect layout for your business needs. AnswerThePublic AnswerThePublic captures individual’s questions and gives you an aggregated view into motivations and emotions. They basically developed a mind-reading platform that gives topics for content, allowing for new conversations and direct answers to the public’s questions! Here’s a fun video on how this business tool works: The Seeker Littledata Our web app gives you simple and actionable insights into your website’s performance by wading through hundreds of Google Analytics metrics and trends. Our goal is to give you summarised reports that matter based on your goals and priorities. You can find out more about specifics in our blog post: A guide to reporting in Littledata’s web app. We also offer some great freebies! These include a free 30-day pro trial or an audit. With the trial, you get access to pro reporting, where you can see intricate details of significant analytics. With the audit, you get a list of recommendations for how to improve your tracking, which we can set up for you and provide further analytics support. Want more info? Contact one of our wonderful experts! We’re a business tool that allows you to get more from your Google Analytics. Grasping the data can be overwhelming so we’d like to remove that stress and help you look at trends that matter. Our web app does the hard work for you by finding important data, so you just need to look at the app or wait for important alerts that you receive by email! Have any other great business tools? Why not let us know in the comments below! Get Social! Follow us on LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook to keep up to date with Google Analytics. Further reading: Inspirational stories of data A guide to reporting in Littledata's web app Image credit: Image courtesy Intercom, Xero, Trello, Skype, Meetup, Canva, Fireshot, Zoho CRM, AnswerThePublic

2016-09-28

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