Cross Domain tracking for Eventbrite using Google Tag Manager (GTM)

Are you using Eventbrite for event registrations? And would you like to see the marketing campaign which drove that event registration correctly attributed in Google Analytics? Then you've come to right place! Here is a simple guide to adding a Google Tag Manager tag to ensure the correct data is sent to Eventbrite to enable cross-domain tracking with your own website. Many thanks to the Lunametrics blog for their detailed solution, which we have adapted here for GTM. Before this will work you need to have: links from your site to Eventbrite (including mysite.eventbrite.com or www.eventbrite.co.uk) the Universal Analytics tracking code on both your site and your Eventbrite pages. only have one GA tracking code on your own site - or else see the Lunametrics article to cope with this 1. Create a new tag in GTM Create a new custom HTML tag in GTM and paste this script: [code language="javascript"] <script> (function(document, window) { //Uses the first GA tracker registered, which is fine for 99.9% of users. //won't work for browsers older than IE8 if (!document.querySelector) return; var gaName = window.GoogleAnalyticsObject || "ga" ; // Safely instantiate our GA queue. window[gaName]=window[gaName]||function(){(window[gaName].q=window[gaName].q||[]).push(arguments)};window[gaName].l=+new Date; window[gaName](function() { // Defer to the back of the queue if no tracker is ready if (!ga.getAll().length) { window[gaName](bindUrls); } else bindUrls(); }); function bindUrls() { var urls = document.querySelectorAll("a"); var eventbrite = /eventbrite\./ var url, i; for (i = 0; i < urls.length; i++) { url = urls[i]; if (eventbrite.test(url.hostname) === true) { //only fetches clientID if this page has Eventbrite links var clientId = getClientId(); var parameter = "_eboga=" + clientId; // If we're in debug mode and can't find a client if (!clientId) { window.console && window.console.error("GTM Eventbrite Cross Domain: Unable to detect Client ID. Verify you are using Universal Analytics."); break; return; } url.search = url.search ? url.search + "&" + parameter : "?" + parameter; } } } function getClientId() { var trackers = window[gaName].getAll(); return trackers[0].get("clientId"); } })(document, window); </script> [/code]   2. Set the tag to fire 'DOM ready' Create a new trigger (if you don't have a suitable one) to fire the tag on every page at the DOM ready stage.  We need to make sure the Google Analytics tracker has loaded first. 3. Test the marketing attribution With the script working you should see pageviews of the Eventbrite pages as a continuation of the same session. You can test this by: Opening the 'real time' reporting tag in Google Analytics, on an unfiltered view Searching for your own site in Google Navigating to the page with the Eventbrite link and clicking on it Looking under the Traffic Sources report and checking you are still listed as organic search after viewing the Eventbrite page Need more help? Comment below or get in touch!   Get Social! Follow us on LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook and keep up-to-date with our Google Analytics insights.

2017-02-07

WWI Codebreaking and Interpretation

Reading Max Hasting’s excellent book on The Secret War, 1939-1945, I was struck by the parallel between the rise of radio communications in the 1930s and the more recent rise in internet data. The transmission of military and diplomatic messages by radio in the 1930s and 1940s provided intelligence agencies with a new gold mine. Never before had so much potential intelligence been floating in the ether, and yet it threatened to flood their limited manpower with a tide of trivia. The bottleneck was rarely in the interception (trivial with a radio set) or even decryption (made routine by Bletchley Park with the Enigma codes), but rather in filtering down to the tiny number of messages that contained important facts – and getting that information in real time to the commanders in the field. The Ultra programme (Britain’s decryption of German radio intercepts) was perennially understaffed due to the fact that other civil servants couldn’t be told how important it was. At Ultra’s peak in 1943, only around 50% of the 1,500 Luftwaffe messages a day were being processed – and it is unknown how many of those were in time to avert bombing raids. The new age of technology provided an almost infinitely wide field for exploration, as well as the means of addressing this: the trick was to focus attention where it mattered. The Secret War, page 203 The ‘new age of technology’ in the last two decades poses much the same problem. Data on internet behaviour is abundant: there are countless signals to listen to about your website performance, and the technology to monitor users is commonplace. And the bottleneck is still the same: the filtering of useful signals, and getting those insights to the ‘commanders’ who need them in real time. I started Littledata to solve this modern problem in interpreting website analytics for managers of online businesses. There is no decryption involved, but there is a lot of statistics and data visualisation know-how in making billions of data points appreciable by a company manager. Perhaps the most important aspect of our service is to provide insights in answer to a specific question: Group-Captain Peter Stewart, who ran the Royal Air Force’s photo-reconnaissance operations, was exasperated by a senior offer who asked for ‘all available information’ on one European country. Stewart responded that he could only provide useful information if he knew roughly what intelligence the suppliant wanted – ‘naval, military, air or ecclesiastical’. The Secret War, page 203 In the world of online commerce, the question is something like whether the client needs insights into the checkout conversion rate of all customers (to improve site design) or for a specific marketing campaign (to improve campaign targeting). So by focusing on insights which are relevant to the scale, stage or sector of the client company, and making these accessible in a real-time dashboard, Littledata can feed into decision making in a way that raw data can never do. Want to discuss this further? Get in touch or comment below!   Get Social! Follow us on LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook and keep up-to-date with our Google Analytics insights.

2017-02-01

Don’t obsess over your homepage – its importance will decrease over time

Many businesses spend a disproportionate amount of time tweaking copy, design and interactive content for their homepage. Yet they miss the fact that the action is increasingly elsewhere. Homepage traffic has traditionally been seen as a proxy for ‘brand’ searches – especially when the actual search terms driving traffic are ‘not provided’. Now, brand search traffic may be finding other landing pages directly. Our hypothesis was that over the last 2 years the number of visits which start at the homepage, on the average website, are decreasing. To prove this, we looked at two categories of websites in Littledata’s website benchmarks: Websites with more than 20,000 monthly visits and more than 60% organic traffic (227 websites) Large websites with more than 500,000 monthly visits (165 websites) In both categories, we found that the proportion of visits which landed on the homepage was decreasing: by 8% annually for the smaller sites (from 16% of total visits to 13% over two years), and 7% annually for the larger sites (from 13% to 11%). If we ignore the slight rise in homepage traffic over the November/December period (presumably caused by more brand searches in the Christmas buying season), the annual decline is more than 10%. From the larger websites, only 20% showed any proportionate increase in homepage traffic over the 2 years – and those were mainly websites that were growing rapidly, and with an increasing brand. I think there are three different effects going on here: Increased sophistication of Google search usage is leading to more long-tail keywords, where users want a very specific answer to a question – usually not given on your homepage. The increase in mobile browsing, combined with the frustrations of mobile navigation, is leading more users to use search over navigation – and bypass your homepage That Google’s search-engine result page (SERP) changes have made it less likely that brand searches (searching for your company or product names) will navigate to your landing page – and instead browse social profiles, news, videos or even local listings for your company. In conclusion, it seems that for many businesses the homepage is an increasing irrelevance to the online marketing effort. Spend some time on your other content-rich, keyword-laden landing pages instead! And would you like to see if you are overly reliant on your homepage traffic, compared with similar websites? Try Littledata’s reporting suite.   Get Social! Follow us on LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook and keep up-to-date with our Google Analytics insights.

2017-01-26

Enhanced ecommerce tracking for travel booking sites

Every online business presence has a goal. These goals (bookings, donations, subscribers, events, or purchases) are the reason for our efforts. But how many of us really track how our goals really perform? In this article, you will find out how to take these business goals and track them on Google Analytics with an ecommerce approach. This article is not about how to set up goals in Google Analytics, but if you are interested in finding out more about the setup or what there are, then read: Setting up a destination goal funnel in Google Analytics. The advantage of using an ecommerce approach for non-ecommerce websites is that after the setup is done, you have a basis to develop correct marketing strategies. You will know what channels brings you money, you will know what channels interact with each other and you can adjust your budget to maximise the ROI. If you're in the business of selling tickets (planes, concerts, conferences), book medical exams or collect donations, this article concerns you! I will show you a step-by-step guide on where to implement the Enhanced Ecommerce features and I will provide links for each to find out how to implement them. Let's say you are Wizz Air. You sell flight tickets and book cars and so on. Promotion impressions and promotion clicks Each time Wizz Air displays a banner with some kind of marketing communication that banner can be tracked as a "promotion" in Google Analytics. In Google Analytics, you can see the performance of each banner and make decisions to replace them, change the order or even make them bigger based on the tracking you implement. The technicalities: implementing via Google Tag Manager or implementing via Google Analytics. After you implement the tracking and create the tags (for GTM) you will be able to see the data in Google Analytics under Ecommerce > Marketing > Internal Promotions Based on the position, click-thru-rate, and revenue gained for each, Wizz Air can then rearrange banners, eliminate some of them or boost their visibility. Ecommerce activities (catalogue views, service page views, click on call to actions) Wizz Air provides multiple sections on the website where you can search for flights. These sections can be mapped as product lists. For WizzAir, the product lists are in the homepage section, timetable section, and maps section. Typically, Google Analytics and Google Tag Manager requests the fields below when sending a product list view (product impressions). I will provide you with a schema that will capture the flight booking particularities but you can use your own business specific examples. When you click on a red point on the map, the customer can see the flights from a particular city. We will send all the flight information from that city as product impressions. 'id': 'LTN - PRG',                          // The departure airport code - The arrival airport code 'name': 'London Luton - Prague',             // City name of departure - City name for arrival 'category': 'Flight',                        // WizzAir offers flight booking along with car booking, and hotel booking 'brand': 'WizzAir',                          // If this would be a tourism agency instead of WizzAir will be other company. 'variant': '010117',                      // If the page has the option to add the date we will add the date as a MMDDYY When the search button is present, you send the action "click". ga('ec:setAction', 'click', {                                    // click action. 'list': 'Maps'                                                          // Product list (string). }); After searching, the client can see the selection page from the product list. For Wizz Air customers, they can search the best price and see the package options. In the case of Wizz Air, these pages can be considered the product pages. The usual structure that needs to be sent to Google Analytics and Google Tag Manager is: 'id': 'LTN - PRG',                                    // The departure airport code - The arrival airport code 'name': 'London Luton - Prague',          // City name of departure - City name for arrival 'category': 'Flight',                                 // WizzAir offers flight booking along with car booking, and hotel booking 'brand': 'WizzAir',                               // If this would be a tourism agency instead of WizzAir will be other company. 'variant': '010117',                             // If the page has the option to add the date we will add the date as a MMDDYY Each time the client changes the day a new detail view should be sent. Clicking on the price box will trigger an Add to cart action. The usual content of an Add To cart activity is: 'name': 'London Luton - Prague',    // The departure airport code - The arrival airport code 'id': 'LTN - PRG',                               // City name of departure - City name for arrival 'price': '61.99',                                  // Selected price for the flight 'brand': 'WizzAir',                          // If this would be a tourism agency instead of WizzAir will be other company. 'category': 'Flight',                        // WizzAir offers flight booking along with car booking, and hotel booking 'variant': '010117',                         //If the page has the option to add the date we will add the date as a MMDDYY 'quantity': 1'                                   // Person number 'dimenstion1': 'LTN13432',           // Flight number 'dimenstion2': 'WizzGO'              // Package option (Basic, Wizz Go, Wizz Plus) Check out steps and booking In the case of Wizz Air, each "continue" button will send a checkout step to Google Analytics. Sending the checkout steps will provide insights about where the customers drop off and what process steps can be improved. Wizz Air has a 4-steps checkout (choose flight, choose passengers, services, and payment). The final thing to send is the transaction (the booking). The structure and implementation details for Google Analytics and Google Tag Manager are in the links and the fields, in this case, will be: 'ecommerce': { 'purchase': { 'actionField': { 'id': 'T12345',                                           // Transaction ID. Required for purchases and refunds. 'affiliation': 'booking.com'                    // Affiliation agent, 'revenue': '35.43',                                 // Total booking value (incl. tax, airport fees etc) 'tax':'4.90', 'shipping': '5.99',                                 //can use this field to capture airport fees or thir party operators fees 'coupon': 'SUMMER_SALE'              //if a discount cupon was used }, 'products': [{                                      //if the flight has a return flight then two products will be sent 'name': 'London Luton - Prague',     // The departure airport code - The arrival airport code 'id': 'LTN - PRG',                                // City name of departure - City name for arrival 'price': '61.99',                                  // Selected price for the flight 'brand': 'WizzAir',                           // If this would be a tourism agency instead of WizzAir will be other company. 'category': 'Flight',                         // WizzAir offers flight booking along with car booking, and hotel booking 'variant': '010117',                          //If the page has the option to add the date we will add the date as a MMDDYY 'quantity': 1'                                   // Person number 'dimenstion1': 'LTN13432',           // Fligh number 'dimenstion2': 'WizzGO'               // Package option (Basic, Wizz Go, Wizz Plus) 'coupon': 'SUMMER_SALE'         // Optional fields may be omitted or set to empty string. }, { 'name': 'Prague -London Luton',    // The departure airport code - The arrival airport code 'id': 'PRG -LTN',                               // City name of departure - City name for arrival 'price': '61.99',                                 // Selected price for the flight 'brand': 'WizzAir',                           // If this would be a tourism agency instead of WizzAir will be other company. 'category': 'Flight',                         // WizzAir offers flight booking along with car booking, and hotel booking 'variant': '150117',                        //If the page has the option to add the date we will add the date as a MMDDYY 'quantity': 1'                                   // Person number 'dimenstion1': 'LTN2143432',        // Flight number 'dimenstion2': 'WizzGO'             // Package option (Basic, Wizz Go, Wizz Plus) 'coupon': 'SUMMER_SALE'        // Optional fields may be omitted or set to empty string. }] } } Sending all these steps to Google Analytics about the customer activity, on any kind of website, will provide you with information about return on marketing spends, improve page layout performance, improve conversion rate, find out insights about customer needs and a lot more. Having the full enhanced ecommerce setup is very powerful and can bring many advantages. You can test the full setup on the Google Analytics demo account. Have any questions or need some help? Please get in touch or comment below!  

2017-01-24

How to track your newsletter performance with Google Analytics – part 2

We will go further into newsletter tracking and try to get all important stats from Google Analytics such as emails sent and emails openings. The advantage to doing this is that for most digital teams, the people creating the newsletters are not necessarily the ones analysing the data. This can help bring the teams a more in-depth view into their work and also a new angle in analysing the newsletter. Before you go ahead and implement this, you should be aware of a few aspects and make some important decisions. First, will you all be using the same Google Analytics account? Since the newsletter opens will send a lot of visits to your Google Analytics account and most of them will be bounces (a high percent of users will not click on the newsletter to go to the website), take into consideration that using the same account will interfere with your existing data from the website. Second, you can create a new, separate account. If you choose to create a new account you need to find out, if you use user tracking, how to link the user activity with the user activity on the website. For Google 360 users this is simpler because they can join views, but for regular Google Analytics users, this might be a struggle. The third option, which I recommend, is to create a second Google Analytics tracking code and run it in parallel with the one you're currently using for the newsletter. Now, let's dive into how you can track email opening and email clicks. The usual Google Analytics script will not work for email clients. However, Google Analytics also includes event tracking which can be used through an embedded image pixel within the email body. Implementing the Google Analytics pixel provides great information like real-time tracking, browser and operating system details and demographics. Insert this snippet in the body of your email like this: <html> <head> ... </head> <body> .... <img src = "Paste the URL here of the Google Analytics implementation"> </body> <footer> ... </footer> </html> Most of the newsletter platforms have an HTML editor, which you can find by searching the sign " <> " in the template. This will let you add <img src = URL> in the body of your email. The URL image pixel looks might like this: <img src="http://www.google-analytics.com/collect?v=1&tid=UA-12345678-1&cid=User_ID&t=event&ec=email&ea=open&el=recipient_id&cs=newsletter&cm=email&cn=Campaign_Name"> Building the URL of the Google Analytics implementation can be done with Google Analytics tool named: Hit Builder. You can also test the URL in the tool and see the hit in real time in Google Analytics. You have two options when sending the openings: as an event or as a custom metric.  Before you go ahead with the HIT Builder let's get familiar with the components of the URL: URL Component Explanation cm1=Custom metric This can be cm1,cm2 etc based on what you've created as a custom metric tid=UA-12345678-1 Your Google Analytics Tracking ID cid=User_ID A systematic tracking ID for the customer t=event Tells Google Analytics this is an Event Hit Type ec=email The Event Category helps segment various events ea=open The Event Action helps specify exactly what happened el=recipient_id Event Label specifies a unique identification for this recipient cs=newsletter Campaign Source allows segmentation of campaign types cm=email Campaign Medium could segment social vs. email, etc. cn=Campaign_Name Campaign Name identifies the campaign to you   To see openings as a custom metric, you should first create a new custom metric in the Google Analytics admin interface named Email Opens. Log in to Google Analytics, and click on Admin. Select the Account and Web Property, and click on Custom Definitions under the Web Property column. Then click on Custom Metrics. In the next window, click on the New Custom Metric button, and give your custom metric a name, formatting type, minimum and maximum value, and make sure the box is checked for Active. You may also find some other benefits to using Google Analytics tracking this way over most email service provider (ESP) tracking. It provides great system information like real-time tracking, browser and operating system details, demographic information including location, and will even tie in nicely with your web reports. How To Use Your Results The event tracking results can be seen in Google Analytics right away. Below are some examples of where you can see reports within Google Analytics. Real Time Events of openings for the newsletter: GA events This report shows the tracking for opens of the emails sent. You can now see how long it takes for people to start opening the newsletter after you've sent them. With this information, you can compare it with past newsletters and see if people are opening it faster or slower, which helps you determine if the subject of the message is motivating enough. Also, you can see what times of the day get the most opens and plan your newsletter schedule around that information. User location With the user location, you can see where in the world people are opening the message you're sending. This can help you determine who your most active audience is and if you should start tailoring your content towards different nations. If you have access to a translation service, this would also be helpful to determine what languages would be beneficial to add to your marketing content. Google Analytics also has a guide, which I recommend to read as well:  Email Tracking - Measurement Protocol.   Get Social! Follow us on LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook and keep up-to-date with our Google Analytics insights.

2017-01-18

How to track your newsletter performance with Google Analytics - part 1

Newsletters are the most common form of digital marketing I have seen in the past years. I really don't know any website that doesn't send at least 1 newsletter a month, whether it's an ecommerce website, news website or a B2B presentation website. There are a lot of email marketing platforms, but the question is how profitable are these newsletters? Most platforms provide some form or analysis on the performance of each newsletter. Most providers can show you the numbers of emails sent, the number of users that opened your newsletter and the number of clicks in the email. Along with Google Analytics, you can see how impactful these newsletters are. I want to show you some hacks to dive deeper in analysing each part of your newsletter and improve your newsletter marketing. Analyse each section in the newsletter separate Most of the newsletter that I saw had several links in them so the best way to track them is to tag each link in a distinctive way using the Campaign Content parameter (utm_content). If you do not know what UTM parameters are, please take a moment to read this article: Why should you tag your campaigns? Using the blog post above create your tagged link and add the &utm_content=link1 OR &utm_content=second banner OR &utm_content=Discount banner (whatever works best for you when analysing the data) at the end. Here is an example: http://www.littledata.ro/?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=20%25off&utm_content=banner1 Here is a newsletter as part of a campaign named: "black friday2" with 3 banners in it. You can see from the data bellow that the top banner had the most clicks, but, in fact, the second banner is the only one that converted. This means that in the future we should move the second banner as a primary banner to have a higher visibility and in this way increase the number of transactions. You can tag all your links in the newsletter (the logo, banners, hyperlinks, products and so on) And see how each section is performing and what is driving the customers to click in the email. In a real email marketing platform, I strongly recommend searching the provider blog to see if they already support this in any way. Here is MailChimp solution for tracking the newsletter performance in Analytics. If the platform you are using does not support Google Analytics at the moment you can just build the URL with Google's URL builder or our simple Littledata URL builder and add it as you normal do in the newsletter. Track users on how they get on your website from a particular newsletter We've tested some hypotheses and the first one is to make a group of users in Google Analytics that come from a newsletter. The standard way is just to tag the newsletter with UTM parameters and create an audience based on that traffic. But to be more precise and go further with the analysis, we can add a new UTM parameter to all the links in the newsletter that contained the User ID. So now this traffic is not random but it's from a customer we've engaged with already and I do have historical data. The benefit of doing so is that, in an era of mobile devices and cross-device interactions, people read newsletters on the move and react or buy on different devices at different times as a result of the same campaign. You, as a marketer need to understand the cross-device movement and so I recommend that you read about this in the blog post: User Tracking To be able to track the activity of each individual user in your newsletter, you need to build a URL with a User ID parameter in it. This step is similar to the one before so you can add on to the URL you already built for your banners and add the unique identifier number of each client like this: http://www.mywebsite.com/?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=20%25off&userID=3D12345 The User ID is generated by the platform you're using, so please take your time and find out if your email marketing solution supports this, along with the email address you've imported and the User Id from your back end. We use Intercom, where you can just add it into the link with a simple click, like this: The platform you're using might be different but if there is an option to import the User Id along with the email address then it is likely that your platform supports this in some way. Once you've added this to the URL, you can then set up a URL variable in Google Tag Manager to pick it up and set up a field with the pageview that will be sent to Google Analytics. For more information, here's how to set a field in Google Tag Manager. Be sure to check back next week for part 2! If you have any questions or would like more help, please get in touch with one of our experts!   Get Social! Follow us on LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook and keep up-to-date with our Google Analytics insights.

2017-01-12

3 reasons you should be using Google Tag Manager for Shopify

Anyone running a Shopify store knows there are hundreds of Shopify apps, integrations and connections in the ecommerce world that can help you grow faster. But from Google Ads, DoubleClick, and Facebook Ads to custom plugins, many tools require you to insert scripts on the pages that need tagging, and for a lot of store owners, this can be a huge hassle without asking for developer help. Google Tag Manager (GTM) can launch new tags with just a few clicks. As the world's most popular enterprise-grade tag management solution, Google Tag Manager supports both Google and third-party tags. We've written quite a few articles on Google Tag Manager (including a full FAQ) and how to use it, but until now, we haven't dug deep into why you should use GTM. Here are 3 reasons why: 1. Reliable and accurate ecommerce data When your tags aren’t working properly, they can hurt your site performance, resulting in slow load times, website unavailability, or a loss of functionality. That’s why it’s critical to have a tag management solution in place that allows you to quickly determine the status of your tags. Easy-to-use error checking and speedy tag loading in Google Tag Manager means you know for certain that every tag works. You can rest assured knowing your mission-critical data is being collected reliably and accurately! Your IT team will also feel confident that the site is running smoothly, so everyone's happy, even during busy holidays or the launch of a new campaign. Large brands have implemented GTM to launch their tags exactly for this reason: reliable and accurate ecommerce data. PizzaHut, Made.com, AgeUK and many other brands running on Shopify use GTM to manage their tags for Google and third-party platforms. Setting up Enhanced Ecommerce via GTM In Google Analytics, the main benefit of using Enhanced Ecommerce tracking (EEC) over standard ecommerce implementation is the amount of valuable reports you have access to as a merchant with EEC. But that's not all—you can also segment data based on ecommerce events, such as: Which users visited your product pages Where your shoppers hit a roadblock in the customer journey (e.g. a shopper viewed a product but never added to cart) Which step of the checkout process a shopper abandoned cart This kind of data helps you zoom in on your sales funnel and update the parts of the process that either stall conversions or slow down the path to purchase. Enchanced Ecommerce implementation is no walk in the park, but it does depend on a few things: How large is your store? How many Google Analytics custom dimensions do you need to add? What type of custom dimensions? etc. Without question, Google Tag Manager is the easiest way to enable Enhanced Ecommerce in Google Analytics — and we can help with that! Do you already use GTM? If you already use GTM to track page views, you must send ecommerce data via Google Tag Manager. If you don't already use GTM...It’s a simple setup: activate EEC within your Google Analytics tags and use a dataLayer as an ecommerce data source. Just make sure the dataLayer contains all ecommerce data! 2. Quickly deploy Google and third-party tags With so many tracking tools out there, marketers need flexibility—whether that’s changing tags on the fly or having the ability to easily add tags from other sources. In GTM, marketers can add or change their own tags as needed. Google Tag Manager supports all tags and has easy-to-use templates for a wide range of Google and third-party tags for web and mobile apps. Don’t see a tag listed? You can add it immediately as a custom tag. With this much flexibility, your campaign can be underway with just a few clicks. Even if you are using Google Ads (Adwords), Adroll, Facebook, Hotjar, Criteo or your own script, you can implement it with Google Tag Manager. Even if you're a publisher as, let's say, nationalgeographic-magazine.com, sell furniture at Made.com, sell event tickets as eventbrite.com or organise courses as redcrossfirstaidtraining.co.uk, GTM is the best way to organise all the scripts your partners provides. 3. Collaborate across the enterprise and make tag updates efficiently Collaboration across a large team can be a challenge. Not having the proper tools can stall workflows, which decreases productivity and efficiency. Workspaces and granular access controls allow your team to work together efficiently within Google Tag Manager: Multiple users can complete tagging updates at the same time and publish changes as they’re ready Multi-environment testing lets you publish to different environments to ensure things are working as expected I don't know about you, but every time I need to add a new script on my website, I hesitate out of fear my website will break and I wouldn't know how to fix it. I wanted a solution where I could add a script on my own, test it and then publish it without any developer help. And then I found Google Tag Manager. GTM lets you collaborate and work independently, at the same time, on the same website. You can publish a tag at the same time your teammate is creating an A/B testing experiment, all in the same GTM container. Adding Google Tag Manager to Shopify will help increase the value of your store and the accuracy of your Shopify tracking. GTM is free, it's reliable, and you can find plenty of how-tos on online so you can start using it right away. Google Tag Manager currently provides out-of-the-box integrations with: Google Analytics AdWords Conversion Tracking AdWords Remarketing (aka Google Ads, which we integrate with for accurate marketing attribution) DoubleClick Google Optimize (which we have a connection for!) Google Surveys Website Satisfaction - Google Surveys AdRoll Crazy Egg Hotjar LinkedIn Yieldify and more This out-of-the-box integration doesn't require any special knowledge. And, for any other script that you might have, we can walk you through the process of integrating Google Tag Manager and Shopify. Questions about GTM? Get in touch with our team of Shopify experts and Google Analytics consultants!   Quick links Building funnels and triggering other marketing tags in GTM How to set up Enhanced Ecommerce tracking via GTM Google Tag Manager FAQ Connecting your Google Analytics store for accurate Shopify tracking

2016-12-13

Online reporting: turning information into knowledge

Websites and apps typically gather a huge flow of user behaviour data, from tools such as Google Analytics and Adobe Analytics, with which to better target their marketing and product development. The company assumes that either: Having a smart web analyst or online marketer skim through the reports daily will enable management to keep tabs on what is going well and what aspects are not Recruiting a ‘data science’ team, and giving them access to the raw user event data, will surface one-off insights into what types of customers can be targeted with which promotions Having worked in a dozen such companies, I think both assumptions are flawed. Humans are not good at spotting interesting trends, yet for all but the highest scale web businesses, the problem is not really a ‘big data’ challenge. For a mid-sized business, the problem is best framed as, how do you extract regular, easy-to-absorb knowledge from an incomplete online behavioural data set, and how do you present / visualise the insight in such a way that digital managers can act on that insight? Littledata is meeting the challenge by building software to allow digital managers to step up the DIKW pyramid. The DIKW theory holds that there are 4 levels of content the human mind can comprehend: Data: the raw inputs; e.g. the individual signals that user A clicked on button B at a certain time when visiting from a certain IP address Information: provides answers to "who", "what", "where", and "when" questions Knowledge: the selection and synthesis of information to answer “how” questions Wisdom: the extrapolation or interpretation of this knowledge to answer “why” questions Information is what Google Analytics excels at providing an endless variety of charts and tables to query on mass the individual events. Yet in the traditional company process, it needs a human analyst to sift through those reports to spot problems or trends and yield genuine knowledge. And this role requires huge tolerance for processing boring, insignificant data – and massive analytical rigour to spot the few, often tiny, changes. Guess what? Computers are much better at the information processing part when given the right questions to ask – questions which are pretty standard in the web analytics domain. So Littledata is extending the machine capability up the pyramid, allowing human analysts to focus on wisdom and creativity – which artificial intelligence is still far from replicating. In the case of some simpler insights, such as bounce rates for email traffic, our existing software is already capable of reporting back a plain-English fact. Here’s the ‘information’ as presented by Google Analytics (GA). And here is the one statistically significant result you might draw from that information: Yet for more subtle or diverse changes, we need to generate new ways to visualise the information to make it actionable. Here are two examples of charts in GA which are notoriously difficult to interpret. Both are trying to answer interesting questions: 1. How do users typically flow through my website? 2. How does my marketing channel mix contribute to purchasing? Neither yields an answer to the “how” question easily! Beyond that, we think there is huge scope to link business strategy more closely to web analytics. A visualisation which could combine a business’ sales targets with the current web conversion data, and with benchmarks of how users on similar sites behave, would give managers real-time feedback on how likely they were to outperform. That all adds up to a greater value than even the best data scientist in the world could bring. Have any questions? Comment below or get in touch with our team of experts! Want the easier to understand reports? Sign up!   Get Social! Follow us on LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook and keep up-to-date with our Google Analytics insights.

2016-12-12
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