Fall 2022 Offsite: From virtual to venue in Barcelona, Spain

Littledata’s team is 100% remote, with hubs across London, New York, and Romania. We have plenty of video calls to keep our global team connected on a regular basis, but at our core we love to spend time working, planning, and learning together in person. And that is exactly what we did in Barcelona, Spain in early October.  At these regular company offsites, we bring everybody together to share ideas and get to know each other. Meetings take a variety of forms. Sometimes they look organized, planned, and presented, and sometimes – personal favorite – they look like a cold pint by the pool soaking up the sun and getting “to the point” of things. Our teammates are based in different parts of the world with various backgrounds and skill sets that drive healthy debate and problem-solving. So, what was the aim of this offsite, you ask? Setting the stage for growth Setting the stage for what is next for Littledata and planning for the future success of the 2000+ brands that use Littledata with other top Shopify and BigCommerce connections like Google Analytics, Recharge, Segment, and Klayvio. Littledata has continued to develop its offerings, products, and resources to help DTC brands be inspired by data and grow their brands. This takes detailed ambition for how and what we will do—much of which comes from our in-person conversations.  Making work fun In our downtime, you can find team members playing games around the hotel, grabbing a company-sponsored massage, exploring the local scenery, doing lite yoga, and more. The venue for each offsite is totally different, but the common thread is togetherness and enjoying the culture the teams have built.  When asked Natalie Upton, Head People and Operations at Littledata, why we make this investment each year she said, "When we invest in in-person offsites, it pays off. We genuinely see our offsites being an excellent learning opportunity as well as bonding as a team and having fun. We have a very curious team, and in-person offsites help us to build confidence in our company's journey. Offsites at Littledata build the DNA of our culture and, in turn, help us to grow faster." Learn and share In the first half of the week, we held several 45-minute learning sessions conducted by team members from different departments. We call this the “Unconference,” inspired by the great times our team has had at MeasureCamp meetups around the world. The learning and discussion sessions covered specifics about our product and roadmap, new challenges on the horizon, sales and marketing, and insights to better understand the current industry happenings.  Littledata has been fortunate to have team members who have both grown with the company and uprise of ecommerce analytics, as well as new joiners who bring fresh ideas to the table. Embracing an always-learning mentality has helped Littledata separate in the quality of the product and customer experience. This has not happened by accident but through the constant pursuit of excellence and education about the ecommerce industry.  You might be visiting us for the first time so in a nutshell, Littledata is a top-rated Shopify app that provides accurate data for modern DTC brands—once you log in to your Shopify account it literally takes ten minutes to set up we start tracking and sending data to top destinations, like Google Analytics or Segment. This removes a huge barrier for brands to have proper attribution for data analysis and building their audiences—saving time and money.  We geek out on the data. However, we are a creative bunch full of new ideas and willing to take on new challenges and long term bets. Working in technology, our team always has an eye on the changing landscape and what data or tactics can lead our customers down the road to success faster. An example of this was discovered on a call with one of our amazing customers, Flux Footwear, who went from zero to six figures using Littledata and Segment Twilio to launch their brand.  Meeting in person to celebrate and learn from these success stories is crucial to our culture and motivates our teams for what is next. Post meetings, you will often see unplanned pods of team members reviewing code, looking at campaign outlines, or talking about any core projects — this is where we truly thrive as a team and working together. Sounds fun, right? We are always looking for the right people to join our team  Littledata has an evolving need as we grow for problem solvers and solution finders. You might be thinking this sounds like a great place to work. It is! Whether or not you see an open position that fits your skillset, we’re always on the lookout for motivated team members to join us on this journey to be inspired by data.  Want to be a part of a workplace that goes beyond the regular 9 to 5 and offers something more? Somewhere to grow professionally and personally, surrounded by teammates who make you feel at home wherever you are in the world? Check out our open positions and apply to become part of the special culture we’ve fostered at Littledata!

2022-11-09

Where Shopify's Web Pixel misses the mark

Shopify tracking is our bread and butter here at Littledata, so we were excited to learn that Shopify has released a new Web Pixel extension API to help stores track key customer events via tracking ‘pixels’, and a Shopify pixels manager to manage these pixels. Together this is Shopify’s Web Pixel feature. There are a couple of things to clarify at the outset. Firstly, Shopify’s Web Pixel is not really a pixel at all, but a way of managing and triggering pixels across a merchant store. Most websites today use some type of Web Pixels to track customer behavior, but Shopify’s standardization and centralization of their own Web Pixel tools is a big deal for both merchants and the partners who work with them. The new Web Pixel signals a change in both how client-side events are tracked, and in how related technologies, such as Google Tag Manager (GTM) and Google Analytics, can access those events. I welcome the move to standardize the data layer for Shopify tracking, and remove some of the challenges for stores using GTM to trigger events. But I believe Web Pixel is being rushed out to fix a problem for tracking Shopify’s new checkout, and that there are a number of problems with tracking customer behavior in modern browsers that Web Pixel can’t solve. I welcome the move to standardize the data layer for Shopify tracking...but there are a number of problems with tracking customer behavior in modern browsers that Web Pixel can’t solve. In this post I look at what Web Pixel is, how it does (and doesn’t) change customer tracking for Shopify stores, and the benefits and challenges of different approaches to tracking. I explain why we think that Shopify Web Pixel currently misses the mark, and what we’re looking forward to as Web Pixel evolves. Let's dive in. Does Web Pixel change customer tracking for Shopify stores? Shopify merchants can track customer events in a variety of ways. Almost every Shopify merchant uses third party marketing platforms like Facebook Ads to drive traffic. And they all want to improve ROAS by sharing customer actions from the storefront and checkout (product views, checkout steps such as Add-to-Cart, etc.) back with those marketing platforms for retargeting and audience building. Historically, this has been done via a client-side browser tracking library: gtag for Google Ads and Google Analytics, Facebook Pixel for Facebook & Instagram Ads, the Pinterest Tag for Pinterest, etc. And there were three main ways stores could get these ‘pixels’ firing on the page: Via a Shopify app Triggered by Google Tag Manager (GTM) A developer adds the tag directly to the store theme In the case of 2 & 3, the challenge was both triggering the events at the correct time (e.g. listening for the click of ‘Add to cart’ button and sending the event before the page reloaded)  and having access to the right page, product and customer details at that time (e.g. product price, variant ID). What is Shopify Web Pixel? Shopify has seen stores struggle to implement tracking over the years, and wanted to make it easier for stores to track without Shopify directly supporting the data destinations. Shopify has been burnt trying to support third party platforms like Google Analytics and Facebook Ads (see the reviews for their Facebook Channel), and would prefer to push that support back to the third parties, or app developers that work with them. In comes Web Pixel. In Shopify’s own words, using the Shopify pixel manager allows: Access to a stream of customer events on your online store, including checkout events An additional layer of security for your online store and your customers, including greater control over the customer data that you share with third-party services Prevention of third party code running non-performing Javascript, or interfering with your online store and checkout Built in tools for privacy compliance Let's look at each benefit in detail, with my commentary. Access to a stream of customer events: this is solving the challenge of triggering the right event. This was always most difficult for the checkout, and will become impossible for Checkout 1 (see "Common problems tracking Shopify’s new checkout", below). However, Littledata already offers proven server-side tracking for any Shopify checkout, including headless builds. An additional layer of security. Yes, restricting access to the storefront by loading the pixels in a sandbox removes the risk of rogue scripts scraping personal data. But it makes it much harder to populate all the data fields that need to be shared with third parties. Littledata’s solution to do that product and customer enrichment server-side is both secure and comprehensive. Prevention of third party code running non-performing Javascript. I've previously written about the 'Wild West’ of stores using the Additional Scripts field. I'm all for removing this risk, but again there’s a trade-off between security and the richness of the data captured. Built in tools for privacy compliance. Shopify launched the customer privacy API back in 2020, but it hasn’t had much adoption among tracking apps. With Web Pixel, Shopify is making every pixel respect the customer cookie consent (as managed by a cookie banner app). This is great, but Littledata already respects customer privacy with complete cookie banner integrations. For stores and app developers I see the key benefit of Web Pixel is robustly triggering standard events and data context for common customer actions. Web Pixel removes the need to build a GTM data layer with an app like Elevar, or set up GTM to use this data layer in the tags. But this, too, is not without complications. What’s wrong with Web Pixel? There are several issues with Shopify's Web Pixel as it exists today. Firstly, it is not solving the key problem in modern web analytics: the increasing gap in client-side tracking due to ad blockers, browser restrictions on cookies and handling customers opting out of tracking. The solution to this is fully server-side tracking, which Littledata is launching in Q4. From a technical perspective, there’s a major limitation with how you could use the tracking library (e.g. gtag) within the Web Pixel callback. To send data to Google Analytics, you would need to load the gtag library on the parent page (either from the theme or a script-tag) and, after the library has loaded, pass the gtag function to the sandbox the Web Pixel runs. This removes most of the security benefits Shopify is touting (not loading additional scripts) and massively complicates setup of custom pixels. Shopify's Web Pixel doesn't solve the key problem in modern web analytics: the increasing gaps in client-side tracking. And then there are a number of gaps in the standard events currently tracked via Web Pixel. I know Shopify intends to patch some of these, but it’s not there yet: No context on the collection being viewed in collection_viewed events No product list impression events No product list click events No remove from cart event No shipping step on the checkout No waiting before page reloads to trigger add to cart events Very limited access to the browser window context (including page URL) for the pixel No post-purchase events (refunds, cancellations, fulfillments) Common problems tracking Shopify’s new checkout Shopify has long said it wants to lock down scripts running in the checkout to protect customer security and privacy. The latest version of the checkout (labelled "Checkout 1"), rolling out for Plus stores in Q4 2022, does this by allowing more checkout customization via API but removing customizations and scripts in checkout.liquid. So if you're a Plus store, and added a GTM container to the checkout.liquid file, these tags will stop working before December. You have three options to continue to track the checkout: Use Littledata’s server-side checkout tracking Use another app making use of the Web Pixel extension Build a custom pixel using Shopify pixel manager If you're not on Shopify Plus then only Littledata’s checkout tracking will work for you right now. Want to learn more? Find out the differences between client-side tracking and server-side tracking. Why is Shopify restricting scripts on the checkout? Google Tag Manager (GTM) is a powerful tool to manage marketing tags, but i’ve written before about how it provides a backdoor for malicious code to be injected into the checkout. For example, hackers can add a keystroke tracking script which relays credit card details as they are typed to the hacker’s server. Or in another hack we saw, the user was directed away from Shopify’s checkout to a similar-looking bogus checkout. Shopify has signaled that they see checkout as core to the ‘OS of ecommerce’ and they want to protect their brand from association with such scams. If that means blocking safe tags like Google Analytics or Google Ads, then that’s a worthwhile trade off for better security in their view. Should your store use the Shopify pixel manager? In short, no. We do not recommend using Shopify's pixel manager. At least not yet. The main use for adding Web Pixel right now is tracking the checkout, but Web Pixel is missing a key step of the checkout (shipping) and are difficult to implement via a custom pixel (for example, loading the tracking library or passing through that library to the sandbox). If you need to add back checkout tracking, or start tracking Google Analytics 4, you’d be far better using a proven analytics app for that. If you want to remove Google Tag Manager from your storefront for performance or security reasons that is understandable, but I’d suggest you wait until 2023 and some of the issues with Web Pixel have been ironed out. For now your options are: Make more use of server-side tracking, which will speed up your site Use Littledata’s GTM data layer to remove custom code that triggers events Web pixel should be useful next year for stores moving to Shopify Hydrogen. For headless Shopify stores we expect Web Pixel to make it easier to track pre-checkout events like page views, product views and add to carts - in addition to the server-side events Littledata tracks for headless stores. Some predictions for the future From our conversations with Shopify, I think the ability for apps to add script-tags to the Thank You page might be removed in 2023. That would make Web Pixel the only way to track purchase events on the Thank You page – but it wouldn’t impact purchases tracked server-side. I don’t think Shopify can or should deprecate script tags across the pre-checkout storefront, because there are lots of uses for additional JavaScript besides from tracking. I predict the impact on the tracking app ecosystem will be similar to when Shopify opened up subscriptions in the checkout in 2021 - a proliferation of apps offering generic functionality, and a race to the bottom in app pricing. I’d expect to see many more free tracking apps - for common platforms, like Facebook, and for niche ones like Roku and Verizon Media - because the technical complexity of launching client-side tracking is reduced. This is especially true for Google Analytics 4. Many brands are waiting for Shopify to release an official GA4 integration, but I don’t think this fits with Shopify’s strategy. They prefer to make it easy for app partners to connect to GA4, and leave these partners to help brands with Google Analytics queries. [tip]See what Shopify stores can do today to prepare for GA4[/tip] And yet I expect an increased demand and perceived value for apps that solve the real challenges of data accuracy and marketing attribution, through server-side tracking and other innovations. I know many brands willing to pay for quality data, and Web Pixel is not able to deliver that just now. [subscribe]

2022-11-08

How completing your store’s data stack helps customers connect with your brand mission

Direct-to-consumer (DTC) brands continue to innovate worldwide, and we know that by 2023 both large and small DTC brands will bring in over $150 billion in the United States alone.  While these brands bring value via their products, many today go the extra mile in their mission to support the environment, healthy lifestyles, or other social causes. Intelligent buyers want more out of brands than a good product—they want to find their tribe.  But how does your tribe find you? Littledata has seen consumers unite behind brands like Grind, Rothy's, and Flux Footwear, bolstering support, sales, and awareness. What do these brands have in common? Besides offering high-quality products and an unmatched user experience, they are all purpose-driven brands who have taken a data-driven approach to audience building and ecommerce growth marketing. And to do that they have built a modern data stack. Step One: Finding the data In today’s increasingly crowded market, DTC brands need to find a way to set themselves apart from the rest. Appealing to consumers' ethos, values, and lifestyles is one of the most effective ways we’ve seen. [tip]Brands use first-party data, collected directly from their customers and websites to re-engage their ideal customers using Google Ads or Facebook Conversions API.[/tip] So how do DTC brands dial in on these values to help navigate company decisions?  We believe all good business decisions are backed by a healthy dose of data discovery—understanding the ins and outs of how customers engage with your brand online and their key demographics.  Finding a single source of truth for that intel is crucial for developing user personas and personalized content for your customer.  One important source of truth is how consumers interact with a brand's ecommerce storefront, but it can seem overwhelming to try to get accurate data about what’s really going on with online shoppers. Our friends at Twilio Segment say it best, “Investing in data quality will improve trust in your data, reduce time spent navigating and validating data, and ultimately allow your business to grow faster.”  Customer data from Shopify or BigCommerce stores can be reported directly in Google Analytics neatly and accurately. This brings to the surface marketing attribution, shopping behavior, checkout experiences, and how subscription customers engage with ecommerce stores.  [tip]Littledata now offers a connection to Google Analytics 4 while running in parallel with Universal Analytics.[/tip] These metrics give way for technical leaders and ecommerce managers to make data-driven decisions that drive personalization. Shopify encourages merchants to drive more personalized emails using analytics. Reviewing how customers engage with your website, from what channel, and their demographics can help brands improve email campaign performance. Step Two: Data-driven personalization Personalization lets the customer know brand care, and when 308 billion emails are sent every day it's important to stand out with unique and targeted emails.  [tip] First-party data is information collected directly from customers or website visitors. This could be on your website, in your app, or through channels such as email and text/SMS. Learn more in our new White Paper: A World Without Cookies [/tip] We’ve seen this first-hand at Littledata, and the issues have become even more urgent during the pandemic and the recent economic downturn. “For purpose-driven brands in particular, organic channels such as email and SMS marketing aren’t just optional – they’re the key to unlocking rapid growth with limited budgets and more brands competing for conscious consumers,” says Littledata co-founder and CMO Ari Messer. Littledata’s customers use apps like Klaviyo and Attentive for customer communications, and we help them get the data they need to turn those channels into personalization superstars. “For purpose-driven brands in particular, organic channels such as email and SMS marketing aren’t just optional – they’re key to unlocking rapid growth” Data for business growth is no longer something that needs to be overly complex or left only in the hands of data scientists. With both no-code and low-code solutions, most customers can access and implement the Littledata app in about 10 minutes. Littledata has meticulously developed a no-code tracking solution that brings you the most accurate and needed data (including custom dimensions for LTV) that your team can use to reach new heights and continue to make an impact.  "We launched our shoe brand utilizing Littledata's integration and data layer. While they handled our ata we were able to focus on other parts of the business. We're a little over a year old and with the help of Littledata, we've gone from generating 6 figures of revenue in our first 2 quarters to doing 6 figures a month. They've been our central tool for linking Google Analytics, Facebook CAPI, and Shopify" —Flux Footwear, Co-Founder Benjamin Loschen Customers today are more educated and motivated by brands—how they buy influences the things they care about. Brands who understand these motivations and can pinpoint opportunities. They can connect behavioral data to marketing tactics and campaigns. Then when brands step back and look at customer LTV and AOV, they can see which customers are the most engaged and re-target them more granularly. Focusing on the product they are selling but also on the impact and mission they are contributing to by being a loyal customer of that brand.

2022-11-02

Catch Littledata customer Veronica Beard at the Twilio Segment conference today

Will you join us today at Twilio SIGNAL? Powered by Shopify, Littledata and Twilio Segment, Veronica Beard used 1st-party data to elevate paid social, turning it from a place where they sold markdowns to the channel with the best lifetime value customers (online shoppers with the highest LTV). Find out how >>> Since debuting at New York Fashion Week in 2012 Veronica Beard has continued to expand both offline and online. How did they do it? Not only with good design and solid materials, but with a data-driven approach to growth. Veronica Beard's Head of Data, Maxime Lagresle, is speaking at SIGNAL today to share insights into using first-party data to grow an industry-leading fashion brand. Maxime’s chat is on “How Veronica Beard moved to first-party data, reduced CAC by 20%, and stopped worrying about cookies”. You can register for free here and not to worry about timing -- all sessions are available on demand videos to accomadate different time zones! Powered by Shopify, Littledata and Twilio Segment, Veronica Beard used 1st-party data to reduce CAC by 20% while increasing customer LTV Interested in learning more about how Shopify Plus brands like Veronica Beard use Littledata and Segment together? Dive into a recent case study we did with our friends at johnnie-O who built a personalized user experience with Shopify, Littledata, and Segment. As their agency puts it: "Littledata’s Segment connector saved the day by streamlining the integration and allowing us to bypass what would have been months of planning and development work implementing an ecommerce tracking plan from scratch." Learn more about connecting Shopify and Segment Check out our latest white paper on first-party data Learn more about Littledata Plus Looking for more detailed interview about how to use Shopify and Segment to accelerate growth? Check out our interview with Rothy's about data-driven growth.

by Ari
2022-11-02

Join Littledata and Daasity for the ultimate GA4 webinar

GA4, the new version of Google Analytics, is the talk of the town these days. But is it really that different from Universal Analytics? What should DTC brands do today? Littledata is joining forces with some of our top partners in the Shopify and BigCommerce worlds to share insider knowledge about the new version of GA4: what's changing, what isn't, and what it all means for data-driven ecommerce businesses. Join us along with our tech partner Daasity and our agency partner Irish Titan for the ultimate GA4 webinar on Thursday, November 3rd. See you there! [tip] Missed this webinar? You can now watch it here on demand [/tip] As Universal Analytics’ last days approach us, we’re still seeing some confusion among ecommerce merchants on their migration to Google Analytics 4: ⚖️ What are the reporting differences between UA and GA4? 🔌 Why hasn't Shopify offered a plug-and-play solution for GA4? 📈 Will GA4 solve cross-domain tracking issues? 🤔 What exactly is event-based tracking anyway? Save your spot today >> With the busy holiday shopping season approaching quickly, there has never been a more important time to get your data ducks in a row. Register for our free webinar and learn how to quickly enable better tracking with first-party tracking with a free platform that is more reliable and robust than many paid solutions. [tip]Did you know? Google has added many features to GA4 that used to only be available to GA 360 customers (the expensive paid version of Google Analytics)[/tip] Littledata's plug-and-play GA4 integration is now available for Shopify and BigCommerce stores, including subscription tracking and conversion events. We've worked with the top Google Analytics experts to make sure we offer the best solution in the industry. Learn more about our GA4 connection for Shopify and Shopify Plus Learn more about our GA4 connection for BigCommerce Learn more about tracking Universal Analytics and GA4 in parallel Get the GA4 ebook Looking for that extra bump in effectiveness? Check out Littledata Plus for managed onboarding, manual data audits and analytics training.

by Ari
2022-10-31

How to track product page events using Littledata variables with Google Tag Manager

The product page is one of the most important places to capture data for any ecommerce store. It's a treasure trove of information on customer behavior, product performance, and, ultimately, conversions and revenue. But depending on your analytics setup, you might be sending data to different destinations—especially if you're using Google Tag Manager. The good news is Littledata is compatible with GTM, and actually improves the accuracy of your setup by using variables that give you deeper insight into the metrics you're collecting. In our newest courses episode, we'll show you how to track product page events using Littledata variables and your GTM setup to track more events and get more insight before you make critical decisions on your store. https://www.youtube.com/embed/3EN8BEG8o4s How to use Littledata Variables with GTM on the Product Page Setting up tracking in GTM for specific product page events is easy using Littledata's variables. All you need to do is set up an event trigger, make sure it's tracking the custom event you want, and label it. Once you have the trigger set up, you can connect it to a tag in your GTM setup and track it in your tags list. This allows you to track events like product name, brand, price, category, and so on. This whole process is expedited by using product variables from Littledata. These variables are stored in the templates section, and once you've selected the template you can search in the variables menu for the specific variable you want to track. From there, it's a simple copy and paste process to add the variable to the tag and start tracking. [tip]The world of analytics is changing—learn how to adapt to a world without third-party cookies in our latest white paper on first-party data.[/tip] Getting a more accurate picture of your store with Littledata and GTM Configuring a custom GTM setup can give you more hands-on control of your ecommerce store's analytics tracking than other solutions, but it also requires time to set up and maintain. If setup or maintenance isn't done properly, tags can break and you'll be left making decisions on incomplete or inaccurate data. Littledata's experts are happy to help you configure your own custom GTM setup, and using Littledata's variables takes some of the complications out of the equation by automating the process for you. If you want the ability to send data to many destinations while ensuring you're always seeing accurate data, then a custom GTM setup with Littledata's data layer could be just the right solution for you. Book a demo with our team to learn more or take advantage of the best deal in the ecommerce data game—30 days of Littledata's accurate tracking on your store absolutely free. [subscribe]

by Greg
2022-09-27

How to adapt to a world without third-party cookies

The ecommerce data industry is going through unprecedented change. It seems every marketer, data scientist, and store owner has at least heard that privacy regulations like GDPR and major tracking prevention updates like iOS14 have broken the old system of collecting data about customers. But the most important question is how should you respond to these changes? The good news is there are still methods to collect critical information about your buyers and use it to target your niche and drive revenue. The main solution in a world without third party cookies—first-party data. Of course it's not enough to just be aware of first-party data. You need to know how to collect it, what insights you can glean from it, and the best methods to set up a first-party data strategy for your store. To help you with all of that and more, we have the only white paper you need on how to replace third-party cookies in your marketing. It's packed with everything you need to know about first-party data: what it is (and what it isn’t), how to collect it, and how to use it to optimize your marketing and make smarter decisions. We’ll also give you some helpful resources to set you on the path to success. How to replace third-party cookies with first-party data When it comes down to it, the biggest problem brands need to solve when replacing third-party cookies is preserving the insights they give into customer behavior. Fortunately there are a handful of ways that can be done with first-party data. In the white paper, we dive into each one, including how to set them up on your store, what insights they provide, and what overall benefits they have over third-party data. The customer insights you can gather from the methods we discuss in the white paper will make a significant difference when it comes to revenue and decision-making. You'll learn strategies to gather some of the biggest ticket metrics, like: Return on ad spendCustomer lifetime valueProduct engagementAdds to cartHighest value customers by demographicMarketing attributionAccurate sales data We also dive into the importance of using the right reporting tools, complete with a section on the newest version of Google Analytics—GA4—and why it matters to start tracking metrics there ASAP. Get ahead of your competitors by making the switch to first-party data with the insights in our white paper and you'll have the tools you need to drive revenue and secure steady growth. Dowload your copy>>> [subscribe]

by Greg
2022-09-21

How to set up Meta’s Facebook Ad Manager and Facebook Conversions API

Targeted ads have become essential for modern brands who want to find buyers in their niche and attract them with unique, engaging messaging. There's a wide range of content and delivery formats you can try, too. Video ads, carousel ads, dynamic product ads, user-generated content—the sky is the limit on how creative brands can leverage social ads to drive reach, conversions, and revenue. Just check out Facebook’s Ad Libary to see what we mean.   But, due to many well-documented changes to third-party data, users of these ads have had to adapt to a new digital landscape and adjust the way they collect buyer data. In this guide, we will walk you through how to set up a Meta Facebook Manager Account and create ads using Meta's new first-party data solution—the Facebook Conversions API. Follow these simple steps below and you'll be ready to start tracking customer behavior and put that data to work for your Shopify store. How to set up Meta Facebook Ad Manager Step 1: Create your Meta Business Account Head over to Meta’s Business Suite and set up your account by clicking “create account” if you have not already done so using your Facebook login. This will allow you to request and manage page permissions to create a Facebook Ad Account. You will need to have permission to the page to connect your store to Facebook Ads Manager.  Step 2: Connect a Facebook Ads account to your Meta Business Account Now that you’ve connected your business page from the dashboard, you can add, request access to, or create an ad account. This is where you'll create ads for your business, monitor spending, and execute your overall ads strategy. Step 3: Add Google Analytics to your Shopify store Next, you'll need to set up reporting to see the effectiveness of your ads. There are a couple of ways to add Google Analytics to your Shopify store, but we'll be sharing a solution here that both works for store owners of any expertise level and is one of the fastest—using the Littledata Shopify to GA connection. [tip]Don’t have a Littledata account yet? Sign up here for a free 30-day trial on us![/tip] Setup for using Littledata's Shopify to Google Analytics is as easy as signing up, installing the app from the Shopify app store, and following the self-serve onboarding flow to add Littledata's tracking script to your store. We have a complete detailed guide you can follow as well. Once you’ve connected, you will be able to see the following applicable events in your Facebook Ad Manager Account:  Great job! You are on your way to starting to run your ads based on accurate data from your Shopify store. Next, we'll set up the Conversions API to run those powerful dynamic ads. How to set up Facebook's Conversions API on your Shopify store Once you're set up in Ad Manager, have Littledata installed, and have your reporting ready in Google Analytics, adding the Conversions API only takes a few steps. First, you'll add the connection from the Littledata dashboard and approve the change to your plan. CAPI uses a combination of client-side and server-side tracking to increase event match quality and Facebook Pixel attribution, so the next step is to enter your Facebook Pixel ID into the app. Finally, in your Business Manager account under the Events Manager section, you'll generate an access token to include with your Pixel ID and finalize the connection. And voila! You're ready to start running dynamic ads and reach your ideal customers using Facebook CAPI. Conclusion Social ads might be changing in our new cookie-less world, but by leveraging the power of server-side tracking and first-party data through tools like Facebook's Conversions API, you can still gain crucial insights about your audience and create ads that will delight them. Now that you know how to get your Meta Business Manager and Facebook Ads accounts up and running, plus how to set up the new Facebook Conversions API, the only next step is to make sure you have the best possible reporting for your data so you can make decisions based on a single source of truth. Try Littledata free for 30 days to see the difference it makes having a truly accurate data layer for your store, plus access to connections that help you manage subscriptions, paid ads, headless setups, and more. [subscribe]

2022-09-14

Try the top-rated Google Analytics app for Shopify stores

Get a 30-day free trial of Littledata for Google Analytics or Segment